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McTEAGUE. A Story of San Francisco
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McTEAGUE. A Story of San Francisco

By Norris, Frank

1899. New York: Doubleday & McClure Co., 1899. 4 pp undated ads. Original red cloth decorated in white. First Edition (with the title page in a three-panel single line border, and with "moment." the last word on p. 106; copies of the revised second printing unfortunately get mistaken as first editions). This copy is in the third and usual state, with signature-25 in proper sequence (some copies got out with a binding error). Frank Norris's masterpiece is McTEAGUE. It is the most purely Zola-esque novel in English, with its cold, careful study of the growing devastation wrought by miserliness on the lives of the Polk Street dentist and his wife. As a motion picture, under the name of "Greed," it was almost equally effective, and gave Zasu Pitts almost her only opportunity as a tragedian. [K&H] Though the tale's end has been criticized as melodramatic, it is not easy to forget the final scene in which McTeague, fleeing after murdering his wife, stands handcuffed in Death Valley to the pursuer whom he has just killed -- awaiting starvation. McTEAGUE was bound in red cloth that unfortunately was stamped in white pigment rather than gilt. This white pigment has proven, over the past century, to flake away notoriously: many copies now are missing much of this stamping, and many have spines that have become totally illegible. This copy is an unusual survivor, with all of the white pigment present; the volume is near-fine (spine slightly faded as usual, front endpaper just cracking). Housed in an open-back slipcase. Blanck 15031; McElrath A3.1.a.1; Zamarano 58; a Johnson High Spot.

$775.00

THE PROFESSOR'S HOUSE
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THE PROFESSOR'S HOUSE

By Cather, Willa

1925. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1925. Original orange cloth with dark blue cloth spine, with dust jacket. First Edition (trade copy; there were also 225 limited-signed copies). Along with her two Nebraska masterpieces and DEATH COMES FOR THE ARCHBISHOP, this novel is often cited as one of Cather's greatest works. It tells the tale of a newly-retired professor and his difficulty both in leaving the house he inhabited for so many years, and in looking forward to what is left of life. Cather actually first wrote the tale "Tom Outland's Story," and only later framed it (as a flashback) between the first and third parts which deal with the professor and his family. This volume is in fine condition; the rather scarce dust jacket is near-fine (unusually clean, and with wear limited to half-inch strips of abrasion along each fore-edge (partly affecting the third "s" in the title); as usual, the orange publisher's logo on the jacket spine has faded. Crane A14.a.i.

$875.00

THE WINGS OF THE DOVE
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THE WINGS OF THE DOVE

By James, Henry

1902. Westminster: Archibald Constable and Co., 1902. Original blind-stamped dark blue cloth. First English Edition, published nine days after the two-volume New York one. This is the memorably tragic tale of Millie Theale, an American girl caught up in the social circles of London and Venice. One of Henry James's better-known works, it was the basis for the 1997 Oscar-nominated film starring Helena Bonham Carter. This copy does not have the 16 pages of ads found in some but not all copies. It is a near-fine copy, with virtually no external wear or soil (very minor darkening of the spine, rear endpaper slightly cracked); atypically, there is no foxing on the thick wove paper used for this 576-page volume. Supino 56.4.0; Edel & Laurence A56b.

$575.00

The Epic of the Wheat. THE PIT
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The Epic of the Wheat. THE PIT

By Norris, Frank

1903. A Story of Chicago. New York: Doubleday, Page & Co., 1903. Original red cloth decorated in gilt. First Edition, first printing (with the J.J. Little device and "First Edition" on the copyright page). This was the second volume in Norris's planned trilogy on human suffering and sacrifice, "The Epic of the Wheat." THE OCTOPUS (1901) had described the struggle between wheat farmers and the railroad interests in California, and THE PIT then follows the same wheat through the manipulation of the commodity markets in Chicago. The third volume, which would have been titled THE WOLF, was going to follow the wheat to its destination, relieving a famine in Europe. However, Norris died in 1902 (after an appendix operation, at age 32), so the third volume was never written. This copy is in the standard bright red cloth binding (there were also "presentation copies" in grey paper boards), and is in bright, near-fine condition (one small mark on the rear cover). Blanck 15038; a Johnson High Spot (though most would place THE OCTOPUS at least on a par with THE PIT).

$225.00

THE QUEEN OF THE PIRATE ISLE
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THE QUEEN OF THE PIRATE ISLE

By Harte, Bret

1886. [illustrated by Kate Greenaway] Illustrated by Kate Greenaway. London: Chatto and Windus, n.d. [1886]. Original olive linen with color pictorial covers, all page edges red. First Edition of this 58-page children's fantasy tale that includes 28 color illustrations by Kate Greenaway. There is a very similar American edition, actually printed and bound in the U.K. at the same time as this edition, with a Houghton Mifflin title page that bears the date 1887. This copy is in what Blanck calls "binding C(B?)" -- pictorial olive linen, page edges stained red, white endpapers; binding A with gilt page edges is believed to have been the first, or certainly the most expensive, but the order of the other two is unknown. It is in remarkably fine condition, without soil or wear -- and is rather uncommon thus. Blanck 7337 (binding "C(B?)").

$375.00

CRAZY TALES. and:  MAKARONY FABLES. Fables for Grown Gentlemen
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CRAZY TALES. and: MAKARONY FABLES. Fables for Grown Gentlemen

By [Hall-Stevenson, John]

1894. (Together, two volumes.) London: Printed for Distribution amongst Private Subscribers Only, 1894/1897. Original blind-stamped green/maroon cloth. These two collections of ribald verse were clandestine publications by the London publisher Leonard Smithers -- who at the turn of the century was the publisher of choice (often the only choice) for writers and illustrators like Oscar Wilde and Aubrey Beardsley. "Ribald" is actually too kind -- today these verses are totally inappropriate (for example "Miss in Her Teens," about 14-year-old Molly and her 15-year-old cousin Dick). The original publication was in the Eighteenth Century: squire of Skelton Castle, Hall-Stevenson had been an intimate friend of Laurence Sterne, and was the original for "Eugenius" in TRISTRAM SHANDY and A SENTIMENTAL JOURNEY; he formed the "club of demoniacks" at his inherited castle (nicknamed "Crazy Castle"), and wrote verses and tales such as these for the members. (His name was John Hall, but he added his wife's surname when we married Anne Stevenson.) CRAZY TALES consisted of 210 numbered copies, of which this is copy #112; MAKARONY FABLES consisted of 300 copies, but we have never seen a copy numbered. Both volumes are in fine condition, except that the maroon cloth of the second volume has some fading -- as usual for that color. See NCBEL II 685.

$250.00

THE JUNGLE BOOK
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THE JUNGLE BOOK

By Kipling, Rudyard

1894. Decorated by J. Lockwood Kipling, C.I.E. New York: The Century Co., 1894. Original olive green cloth decorated in gilt. First American Edition, published in the same year as the English edition. Many of the illustrations are by John Lockwood Kipling, Rudyard's father. This book and THE SECOND JUNGLE BOOK, along with JUST SO STORIES, constitute Kipling's best-loved work: For there is a unique magic in the JUNGLE BOOKs from the moment the infant Mowgli enters the wolf's lair, and the moonlight is blacked out at the mouth of the cave by the great head of the tiger Shere Khan, and his roar fills it with thunder. There is magic too in the jungle, so glowingly portrayed, with its danger-haunted thickets, and the monkeys threading its frail liana ways, the enchanted land of which Mowgli is to become the master; and in the animals who are his friends and mentors -- Bagheera, the sleek and terrible panther; Baloo, the wise old bear; Hathi, the elephant; Kaa, the gigantic python who makes a nest for Mowgli in his coils; Akela, the leader of the wolf-pack; and the bandarlog, chattering outcasts of the tree tops, whose only wish is to be noticed, and who immediately abandon every task they have begun. [Birkenhead] This volume is very good-to-near-fine (cover gilt a little less than bright, a few foxing spots at the bottom of the rear cover); at an early stage the original endpapers were covered with matching ones. Richards A77; Stewart 124.

$350.00

THE SEVEN SEAS [large paper edition]
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THE SEVEN SEAS [large paper edition]

By Kipling, Rudyard

1896. London: Methuen and Co., 1896. Original dark red buckram with pictorial vignette in gilt. First English Edition, containing three poems not in the slightly earlier American edition. This volume of verse (largely nautical) includes "A Song of the English" and "Hymn Before Action." This is one of 150 large-paper copies on handmade paper (in a binding similar to a standard copy's; there were also 30 copies on Japan paper, in a white binding. This is a nearly fine copy (spine a little faded, as always); the front endpaper bears an 1897 grammar school prize label and inscription, and a copy of Kipling's "Recessional" has been tipped to the rear free endpaper. Richards A93; Stewart 140. Housed in an open-back case with black calf labels.

$225.00

JOSEPH CONRAD'S DIARY of His Journey up the Valley of the Congo in 1890
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JOSEPH CONRAD'S DIARY of His Journey up the Valley of the Congo in 1890

By Conrad, Joseph

1926. With an Introduction and Notes by Richard Curle. London: One Hundred Copies, Privately Printed [by Strangeways], January 1926. Original green cloth with printed spine label. First Edition, limited to 100 copies. This was the diary that Conrad kept while on his 1890 journey up the Congo River -- a trip that later became the foundation of his best-known short story, "Heart of Darkness." His friend and biographer Richard Curle had this volume published two years after Conrad's death. This is a near-fine copy, with essentially no wear but with the cloth sunned, as usual; there was no dust jacket, unless perhaps an unprinted glassine one. Not in Keating.

$250.00

THE LAST BLACKBIRD and Other Lines
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THE LAST BLACKBIRD and Other Lines

By Hodgson, Ralph

1907. [the dedicatee's copy] London: George Allen, 1907. Original deep reddish-brown cloth, with dust jacket. First Edition, first issue (with top edge gilt and other edges untrimmed) of this collection of 26 poems -- the poet's first book, published when he was 26. Hodgson (1871-1962) was a reclusive man who avoided publicity, but who in his time was quite popular, and a few of his poems regularly appear in anthologies; he was also an early voice for ecology, writing about man's destruction of the natural world. A friend of Walter De la Mare, at the time of this first book Hodgson was working as an artist for various publications; in 1913 he would co-found a private press "At the Sign of the Flying Fame" with the illustrator Claud Lovat Fraser and the journalist Holbrook Jackson; in 1924 he would move to Japan to be an English lecturer -- also becoming a major factor in translating classical Japanese poetry into English. Ultimately he and his (second) wife retired to Ohio. This copy of the first issue is in near-fine condition, slightly rubbed at the extremities; included is the quite scarce dust jacket, in very good condition (minor edge-wear, with a couple of discreet reinforcements on the verso). Provenance: the front free endpaper bears the inscription "'The smallest of red books but very much therein... Some books are alive.' G.A.B.D. April 30, 1907"; there are also several penciled notations alongside some poems. Per the dedication page, G.A.B.D. was the dedicatee of this book -- George A[lbemarle]. B[ertie]. Dewar -- a writer who wrote about the natural world in such books as THE BOOK OF THE DRY FLY (1897). This association copy could be labeled the Dedication Copy.

$250.00

THE NEW ARMY IN TRAINING + FRANCE AT WAR + THE FRINGES OF THE FLEET
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THE NEW ARMY IN TRAINING + FRANCE AT WAR + THE FRINGES OF THE FLEET

By Kipling, Rudyard

1915. [Together, three volumes.] London: Macmillan and Co., 1915 (all three). Original pale yellow wrappers (latter two volumes: cream wrappers) stamped in red (and for the latter two, dark blue). Two pages of undated ads in the latter two volumes; in the first volume, the cover serves as title page. First Editions of all three titles (following only some American copyright copies). At the request of the Ministry of Information, Kipling wrote numerous articles (initially to appear in the Daily Telegraph) dealing with the war then just getting underway. The pieces in the first volume actually appeared in the Telegraph in December 1914, whereas the articles in the latter two volumes appeared between September and December 1915. The latter two volumes also include verse that Kipling wrote for the occasion. Near-fine condition (scarcely any wear, the slightest of soil). Richards A276 + A280 + A283; Stewart 383 + 387 + 393. Housed together in a modern clamshell case.

$250.00

UNDER WESTERN EYES
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UNDER WESTERN EYES

By Conrad, Joseph

1911. [a fine copy] London: Methuen & Co., (1911). 32 pp ads dated Sept 1911. Original red cloth decorated in gilt. First Edition, which consisted of 2,250 domestic copies (plus 750 colonial). This is a tale of Russian revolutionaries, centered about the character Razumov (whose name was Conrad's working title of the book). Harper, which published the American edition, declined to handle the serialization "because their magazine circulated in Russia and they feared it would cause a breach in their good relations with that country" [Cagle]. This copy has the ads dated September -- some are dated August, but the book was not actually published until 5 October so neither ad date is considered "primary." This is a fine copy -- remarkably clean and unworn, with bright gilt and no fading on the spine. UNDER WESTERN EYES is rather scarce in this condition. Cagle A14a(1).

$650.00

VICTORY. An Island Tale
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VICTORY. An Island Tale

By Conrad, Joseph

1915. Garden City NY: Doubleday, Page & Company 1915. Original navy blue cloth decorated in gilt. First Edition (published six months before the London edition) of Conrad's sad tale of Axel Heyst and the evil (for which read "Germanic") Schomberg. Due to the six-month delay of Methuen's edition, with the Great War raging, Conrad added to that edition a preface that discusses the "Teutonic psychology" of Schomberg. This American edition is noteworthy for its front endpaper map of the world, showing where Conrad's previous tales had all taken place. This is an attractive copy, nearly fine (the slightest of rubbing at the extremities). Cagle A19a.

$350.00

CHANCE
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CHANCE

By Conrad, Joseph

1914. A Tale in Two Parts. London: Methuen & Co., (1914). 8 pp ads dated Autumn 1913 plus 32 pp ads dated July 1913. Original green cloth decorated in gilt. First Edition of the novel that revived Conrad's career, a popular smash after about a decade without one. Conrad had been working on it since 1906. It was the success of CHANCE that caused many of his earlier works to be reprinted. This copy is in the first published state (with the cancel title leaf dated 1914 on the verso, tipped onto the stub of the leaf that had original been so dated 1913): it is believed that only about 52 copies were issued with the integral 1913 title leaf before a binder's strike delayed publication into 1914. This copy has the spine brass reading "METHVEN," the 8-page Autumn ad catalogue with THE HARROVIANS leading off p. 6, and with closing quotation marks after "Narcissus" on the half-title verso. It is in remarkably fine, bright condition (the only minor flaw is evidence of the removal of a bookplate from the front free endpaper verso). Uncommon in this condition. Cagle A17a.10. Provenance: bookplate of the renowned collector Paul Lemperly (1858-1939), whose library was sold by Parke-Bernet Galleries in 1940.

$475.00

INDEPENDENCE [in wrappers and in cloth]
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INDEPENDENCE [in wrappers and in cloth]

By Kipling, Rudyard

1923. Rectorial Address delivered at St. Andrews, October 10, 1923. London: Macmillan and Co., 1923. Two copies: one in grey wrappers printed in dark blue, and one "large paper" in red cloth printed in gilt. First Editions, preceding even the American copyright issue. This was the speech that Kipling gave on his inauguration day, having been elected Rector of St. Andrews University in Scotland. This title was later (1928) collected in A BOOK OF WORDS. The standard copies were bound in grey wrappers; "large paper" copies (though they aren't much larger) were bound in bright red cloth, without dust jacket; here is a copy of each, in fine condition. Richards A343; Stewart 552. Housed together in a modern slipcase.

$195.00

THE RAZOR'S EDGE
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THE RAZOR'S EDGE

By Maugham, W. Somerset

1944. A Novel. London / Toronto: William Heinemann, (1944). Original dark blue cloth, with dust jacket. First English Edition (about four months after the American) of one of Maugham's major novels. It is the story of a former American World War I fighter pilot who, suffering from what we would today label as PTSD, embarks on a search for some meaning in his life, winding up in India. Two years after publication the book was put onto the big screen, starring Tyrone Power, Gene Tierney and Anne Baxter (who won a Best Supporting Actress Oscar) -- and again in 1984 starring Bill Murray and Teresa Russell. This volume is in fine, bright condition -- rather unusual for such a cheaply-produced wartime book; the jacket is nearly fine as well (a couple of short edge-tears, but the paper has remained cleaner and greener than we typically see). Toole Stott A63c.

$575.00

Six Stories Written in the FIRST PERSON SINGULAR
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Six Stories Written in the FIRST PERSON SINGULAR

By Maugham, W. Somerset

1931. London: William Heinemann, (1931). Original blue cloth, with dust jacket. First English Edition (published a month after the American one) of this collection of six tales. They were set in England and on the Continent. Maugham meant to show that his countrymen could misbehave at home just as well as in the tropics. In "Virtue" a middle-aged woman leaves her husband for a younger man because she thinks it is the honest thing to do. Her husband then kills himself, and the lover deserts her. Maugham had made the point before that a virtue taken to an extreme leads to disaster. If she had had an affair with the younger man, things would have been all right [Morgan]. This volume is bright and fine (a little foxing only on the fore-edge of the leaves); the leaves are "tight" enough to suggest that the book has not been read. The dust jacket, with P. Youngman Carter's illustration of a gentleman leaning against a giant letter "I" (on both the front cover and the spine), is close to fine as well -- a few tiny edge-nicks (understandable since the jacket stands slightly taller than the book), but essentially no other wear nor soil. Toole Stott A42b.

$575.00

STALKY & CO
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STALKY & CO

By Kipling, Rudyard

1899. [the Publisher to Major Pond] Toronto: George N. Morang & Co., 1899. Original dark green cloth with Viking longboat design in black. First Canadian Edition -- technically, the Canadian issue of the first American edition, which was published in this binding by Doubleday & McClure ten days before Macmillan's UK edition. These nine hilarious tales of school life (of the mischievous Stalky, Beetle and McTurk) are based on Kipling's own days at the United Services College. Included are eight illustrations by L. Raven Hill, which are not in the UK edition. American sheets were bound up with a Morang title leaf, and the binding was altered only to read "MORANG" at the foot of the spine (some Canadian copies were put up in red wrappers). One little oddity of this Canadian edition is that Kipling's prefatory poem here follows the Contents and Illustrations leaves, whereas in the American edition (and in the UK edition), the poem precedes those leaves. This is a bright copy, fine except for very light rubbing at the corners. Richards A144 (note). Provenance: this is an inscribed presentation copy from the publisher to the American literary agent and lecture-tour impresario, ["Major"] James P. Pond. The front free endpaper bears the inked inscription "Mr J. B. Pond With the kind regards of the Publishers Geo N. Morang & Co.", and the opposing paste-down bears Pond's less-than-modest bookplate. Pond was the "major" American literary agent of that era.

$275.00

THE THIRD VIOLET
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THE THIRD VIOLET

By Crane, Stephen

1897. New York: D. Appleton and Company, 1897. Original tan cloth decorated in red, black and gilt. First Edition of Crane's sixth book, a romance about young impoverished artists. It was not long after he finished writing this, and before it was published, that Crane was ship­wrecked near Jacksonville, as he was headed off to cover the war in Cuba (Crane had to spend three days in an "open boat"). THE THIRD VIOLET was something of a success, but artistically it seemed a distinct blot on Crane's reputation... [One reviewer observed,] "We hope that THE THIRD VIOLET, which is a hopelessly scentless one, will be the last of its kind, and that instead of violets Mr. Crane will give us war -- war -- war." [Stallman] This was to be the last of Crane's four Appleton books to appear in this tan binding. This copy is in fine condition, with very little of the cover soil and darkening that is typical for this light-colored binding. Williams & Starrett 13; Blanck 4078.

$475.00

THE HOUND OF THE BASKERVILLES
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THE HOUND OF THE BASKERVILLES

By Doyle, A. Conan

1902. Another Adventure of Sherlock Holmes. London: George Newnes, 1902. Original red cloth decorated in gilt and black. First Edition of Doyle's famous full-length Sherlock Holmes novel, illustrated by Sidney Paget -- a tale Doyle himself termed "a real creeper." This was the first Sherlockian tale since Doyle had apparently killed Holmes off in "The Final Problem" of late 1893. However, since THE HOUND takes place chronologically before then, Doyle was not here officially "reviving" Holmes; this he would do the following year, when he wrote "The Adventure of the Empty House" -- which would be the first tale of THE RETURN OF SHERLOCK HOLMES in 1905. This copy is in very good-plus condition: there is a small scar near the fore-edge of the front cover, but otherwise there is little external wear besides the usual rubbing of the gilt; other than some foxing on a few leaves near each end of the volume, the thick wove paper has held up well, and the endpapers are intact. All sixteen plates are of course present, and remain quite clean and sharp. Though THE HOUND was issued in considerable numbers, it is becoming difficult to find in truly advantageous condition. Green & Gibson A26a.

$3500.00

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