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A MESSAGE FROM THE SEA and THE UNCOMMERCIAL TRAVELER
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A MESSAGE FROM THE SEA and THE UNCOMMERCIAL TRAVELER

By Dickens, Charles ("Boz")

1861. Philadelphia: T.B. Peterson & Brothers, n.d. [1861]. Without original wrappers. First American Edition of THE UNCOMMERCIAL TRAVELER. "A Message from the Sea" was the All The Year Round Extra Christmas Number at the end of 1860; the pieces that formed THE UNCOMMERCIAL TRAVELLER (so spelled in England) appeared there too, and were then published in book form in London in December 1860 (though dated 1861). In the U.S., Harper paid to have the pieces appear in Harper's Weekly, after which they conveyed the publishing rights to Peterson, who published the first American edition on 2 February 1861, advertised at 50 cents. As bibliographer Walter Smith indicates, Peterson was and is a bibliographer's nightmare -- as no volumes were dated, and multiple printings are differentiable only by their wrappers and ads; however, a general rule of thumb is that Peterson's first format was wrappers without illustrations, followed by cloth with separately-inserted plates, and then cloth with integral illustrations. This is a volume from Peterson's "Uniform Edition" of Dickens's works, initially bound in wrappers no longer present. This volume consists of a joint title page ([5]), a Contents page ([7]), and text continuously-paginated from p. 9 through p. 169 (THE UNCOMMERCIAL TRAVELER begins on p. 75). The ads printed on p. [170] (actually bearing the page number "(7)" at the foot) list other authors' books that were first published no later than 1860; this is the same ad page as appeared in Peterson's first American edition of GREAT EXPECTATIONS, which was published on 27 July 1861 -- and therefore this is not the very first printing of this edition. Smith lists five copies he examined -- this copy plus four in institutional collections -- and only two of them (at Kent State and at Wellesley) are in wrappers, but even those bear a price of 75 cents, and thus are not the very first printing; Smith was unable to locate a single copy in wrappers bearing the price of 50 cents. All of this means: this is a scarce book! Except for the fact that the original wrappers are lacking, this volume is in fine condition (spine overlaid with archival paper). Smith pp 121-125 (the "personal copy" of Note 2a is this one -- which Smith has signed in pencil); see Podeschi (Yale) D25. Housed in a simple paperboard folder.

$1250.00

PICTURES FROM ITALY

By Dickens, Charles

1846. New-York: Wiley & Putnam, 1846. Original blind-stamped red cloth. First Complete American Edition, issued as No. LXIII in Wiley & Putnam's "Library of Choice Reading" -- available either in wrappers on its own, or bound in red cloth together with Mrs. Jameson's MEMOIRS AND ESSAYS, as here. During 1846 seven letters from Dickens in Italy were published in The Daily News in London, and in America Wiley & Putnam jumped on them and published them in two wrappered parts titled TRAVELLING LETTERS WRITTEN ON THE ROAD -- the only such book edition on either side of the Atlantic (and extremely scarce today). Later that year Dickens polished up the letters and added considerably to their number, creating the U.K. volume PICTURES FROM ITALY, published on May 18th; Wiley & Putnam quickly issued this corresponding American edition on June 8th, followed "a day or two" [Smith] later by William Colyer's edition. Condition of this copy is very good: the original endpapers are intact but there is some wear along the outer joints (though the book is tight). Smith pp 77-80 (including photographs of this copy); Podeschi (Yale) A100 (listing only a copy in wrappers); Carr (Texas) B495 (likewise); Wilkins p. 28. Provenance: the front paste-down bears a college bookplate, and a number is stamped onto the copyright page; the front free endpaper bears the penciled signature of Dickens bibliographer Walter Smith.

$975.00

SOME REMINISCENCES
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SOME REMINISCENCES

By Conrad, Joseph

1912. London: Eveleigh Nash, 1912. 2 pp undated ads. Original dark blue cloth. First Edition of this autobiographical work, which initially appeared serially in Ford Madox Ford's newly-founded "English Review." What is remarkable about Conrad's reminiscences is how clearly he employed fictional techniques worked out with Ford,... wherein the narrative intensity increases as the story develops. To achieve that, Conrad used a constantly interrupted narrative as a way of unsettling conventional sequences and, thereby, established anticipation of the next episode. Conrad needed a method that permitted intimacy, up to a certain point, and then withdrawal, when he had revealed enough... so his reminiscences would be matters of attack and retreat. [Karl] Conrad's 17-page "Familiar Preface" is signed "J.C.K." to reflect his Polish last name Korzeniowski. SOME REMINISCENCES is generally believed to have slightly preceded the American edition -- which, as with subsequent English editions, was titled A PERSONAL RECORD. Wise claimed that only 1,000 copies were printed (apparently including some bound by Bell as the colonial issue), but Nash records have not survived to substantiate this. This is a near-fine copy with only the slightest of edge-wear. Cagle A15b.1.

$425.00

A CHILD'S HISTORY OF ENGLAND
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A CHILD'S HISTORY OF ENGLAND

By Dickens, Charles

1853. [the scarce first US edition] [In Two Volumes.] New York: Harper & Brothers, 1853/1854. Original blind-stamped red cloth with gilt-decorated spines. First American Edition, first printing (dated 1853 and 1854, and with a different publisher's address in each volume). As with the three volumes of the English edition, which were issued separately in December of 1851, 1852 and 1853, the two volumes of Harper's edition were obviously issued separately -- on 18 March 1853 and on 25 March 1854, according to bibliographer Walter Smith (from the Harper Archives). When Harper published the second volume, they also released a new printing of the first (with its date changed to 1854, and with their address changed to 82 Beekman Street). A two-volume edition was also published by Jenks, Hickling & Swan of Boston, but with both volumes dated 1854. This is a very good copy, the only significant defect being some chipping at the ends of the spines. In our experience this edition (especially the 1853-dated first volume) is scarce in original cloth -- much scarcer than the three-volume English edition; in fact this is the only such 1853/1854 copy we have had (twice) in our forty years in business. Smith pp 110-113 (with photographs of this copy); Podeschi (Yale) A129; not in Carr. Provenance: both volumes bear the penciled signature of bibliographer Walter Smith; also included is Sumner & Stillman's original 2012 description-slip for this copy, part of the Dan Calinescu Collection, purchased by Walter Smith -- with his penciled instructions to the printer regarding photography of this copy in his bibliography.

$1650.00

A CHILD'S HISTORY OF ENGLAND
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A CHILD'S HISTORY OF ENGLAND

By Dickens, Charles

1854. [in Two Volumes.] Boston: Jenks, Hickling & Swan, 1854. Original blind-stamped dark brown cloth with gilt-decorated spines. Early American edition, just possibly the first complete one. Since Harper published the two volumes of its edition separately in March 1853 and in March 1854 (so dated on the title pages), it is considered to be the first American edition. The date in 1854 when these two Boston volumes were published is unknown, so it is possible that this two-volume Boston edition came out earlier in 1854 than Harper's second volume. Jenks Hickling & Swan was a very "fluid" enterprise at the time, such that their 1856 and 1857 two-volumes-in-one printings would be by Hickling Swan & Brown, and their 1861 two-in-one printing would be by Swan Brewer & Tileston. This set is in very good-plus condition (a few small holes in the cloth, mainly at extremities or at joints); the gilt on the spines is unusually bright. Smith pp 116-119; Carr (UTexas) B500 (in blue cloth); not cited by Podeschi. Provenance: both front free endpapers bear not only a contemporary signature, but also the penciled signature of Dickens bibliographer Walter Smith; in fact, this very copy is the one pictured on pages 117 and 118 of his book.

$425.00

INTO THE EAST. Notes on Burma and Malaya
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INTO THE EAST. Notes on Burma and Malaya

By (Conrad, Joseph) Curle, Richard

1923. [inscribed by Curle] With a Preface by Joseph Conrad. London: Macmillan and Co., 1923. Original mottled red cloth lettered in gilt. First Edition of this volume of travel notes on what were then called Burma and Malaya, by this Scotsman who was a good friend of Joseph Conrad. Conrad, whose first two books were sited in the same area, and who had frequently sailed there as a seaman, provided the 17-page Preface. The two had met in 1912, as part of Edward Garnett's circle, and two years later Curle had written the very first book-length "appreciation" of Conrad; later Curle was the dedicatee of Conrad's THE ARROW OF GOLD. (Curle was present at Conrad's home on the day of JC's death in 1924, and was subsequently co-executor of Conrad's literary estate.) This is a very good-plus copy (some soil on the front cover). This is a "multiple" inscribed presentation copy signed by Richard Curle. In fact it is inscribed FOUR TIMES by Curle -- once signed and thrice initialed. The earliest one, initialed "R.C." (on the front free endpaper), is scarcely visible, because Curle later tried to bleach it out (?) in order to inscribe it as described below. Written in ink on top of that inscription is "Miss Rewarvan Anirkhavian (?) with very many thanks for her work in typing the catalogue. [signed] Richard Curle | July 1929". Curle then added, at the bottom of the same leaf, "This, being the English edition, is not so easy to get here, but it's the right one to have. So please forgive a former name on this page. R.C." And finally, on the opposing paste-down, Curle later added in a different ink: "But now it suddenly occurs that perhaps the Eng. & Am. editions were quite similar: I must find out -- it's too late to worry anyhow! R.C." We cannot locate any reference to the recipient, but the "catalogue" Curle refers to was most likely the catalogue of his own 234-item Joseph Conrad collection (including manuscript material and many inscribed copies), which was auctioned at The American Art Association on 28 April 1927.

$350.00

A YANKEE IN CANADA, with Anti-Slavery and Reform Papers
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A YANKEE IN CANADA, with Anti-Slavery and Reform Papers

By Thoreau, Henry David

1866. ["Civil Disobedience" -- fine] Boston: Ticknor and Fields, 1866. Original green cloth stamped in gilt on the spine. First Edition, which consisted of only 1500 (Borst) or 1546 (Blanck) copies. This is a posthumous collection of essays, edited by William Ellery Channing and Sophia Thoreau (the author's sister). Its best-known piece is "Civil Disobedience," which Thoreau had initially delivered as a lecture and which had previously been printed only in Elizabeth Peabody's "Aesthetic Papers" in 1849. Thoreau wrote it after spending a night in the Concord jail in 1846 (an episode that has been put on the stage and on the screen), after refusing to pay a poll tax that he felt might help pay for the war against Mexico -- a war he condemned as an attempt to increase the number of southern slaveholding states. Asserting that "That government is best which governs not at all" and that "Government is at best but an expedient," the author points to such injustices and abuses as the prosecution of the Mexican War, the treatment of native Indians, and the institution of slavery. To cooperate with government, even to the extent of paying taxes, he says, is to condone its crimes and participate in them, and an "honest man" must "withdraw from this copartnership." Individual conscience, not law, is the moral arbiter; "under a government which imprisons any unjustly, the true place for a just man is also a prison." [OCAL] Both Mahatma Gandhi and Martin Luther King Jr, referred to "Civil Disobedience" as being an essential part of their backgrounds. Among the other pieces collected in this volume is "Prayers" -- erroneously included by the editors, since it was actually written by Ralph Waldo Emerson (though the poem within it, on p. 120, was by Thoreau). This copy is bound in Blanck's "A" style ("sequence not determined"), with a wreath blind-stamped on each cover ("B" and "C" lack this); the cloth is green sand-grain (both bibliographers cite numerous colors and grains of cloth, but not this combination). The exterior condition of this copy is fine, with virtually no wear or soil; as usual, there is some scarce-visible cracking of the delicate original endpapers down in the gutter. Borst A7.1.a; Blanck 20117. Housed in a custom clamshell case.

$3500.00

APOLOGIA PRO VITA SUA [in 8 parts -- plus 3 related pamphlets]
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APOLOGIA PRO VITA SUA [in 8 parts -- plus 3 related pamphlets]

By Newman, John Henry

1864. [in original parts, + others] being A Reply to a Pamphlet entitled "What, then, does Dr. Newman mean?". [Complete in eight serial parts -- I through VII plus the Appendix.] London: Longman, Green, Longman, Roberts, and Green, 1864. Original buff wrappers printed in black. **With:** Kingsley, Rev. Charles. "WHAT, THEN, DOES DR. NEWMAN MEAN?" London & Cambridge: Macmillan and Co., 1864. Stitched. **With:** [Newman, J.H.] MR. KINGSLEY and DR. NEWMAN: A CORRESPONDENCE on the Question... London: Longman, Green, Longman, Roberts, and Green, 1864. Original self-wrapper. **With:** Meyrick, Rev F. BUT ISN'T KINGSLEY RIGHT AFTER ALL? London: Rivingtons, 1864. First Edition in the original eight serial parts (at the conclusion of which the APOLOGIA was issued in book form) -- together with Kingsley's original pamphlet that caused Newman to respond, and Newman's summation of their correspondence (which does not appear in the book form). Newman had always been inclined to brood over the general misunderstanding of his motives, and hoped for an opportunity of vindication. A chance aspersion by Kingsley [Charles, in a book review -- claiming that Newman had said "Truth, for its own sake, has never been a virtue of the Roman Catholic clergy"]... woke Newman to life. It led first to an exchange of letters; then to an exchange of pamphlets; and then to what many have called the most beautiful piece of prose in the English language, the greatest confession since Rousseau and St. Augustine, the APOLOGIA PRO VITA SUA. Written under great pressure and published in parts as they were completed from April to June 1864, it aroused an instantaneous response among Catholics and Protestants alike... Newman's most striking characteristic was his unusual emotional sensitiveness. He is said to have written much of his APOLOGIA with the tears streaming down his face... The slight suspicion with which he had been regarded within the Catholic Church having been dissipated by the APOLOGIA, and the accession of a new pope removing reluctance in higher quarters, the long-awaited recognition came, and in 1879 Newman was created Cardinal... [K&H] A classic from the day it was completed, the 'Apologia' will ever be the chief authority for Newman's early thoughts, and for his judgment on the great religious revival known as the Oxford Movement, of which he was the guide, the philosopher, and the martyr [Catholic Encyclopedia]. The eight serial parts are in very good-plus condition (quite clean except for the front cover of the Appendix, some wear to the very delicate spines). Three of the parts have page numbers penciled lightly onto the front cover, indicating the location of marginal penciled notes within. One of the "Grolier 100" books of English Literature. Colbeck p. 605. Housed in a custom clamshell case. Provenance: case booklabel of Robert and Donna Jackson; exhibited in 1996 at the Grolier Club, "Essential Parts" (p. 38).

$2750.00

TRANSATLANTIC SKETCHES
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TRANSATLANTIC SKETCHES

By James, Henry Jr.

1875. Boston: James R. Osgood and Company, 1875. One preliminary page undated ads. Original terra-cotta cloth, beveled. First Edition of Henry James's second book, which consisted of either 1500 (per E&L) or 1578 (per Blanck) copies. Published in the same year as his first (A PASSIONATE PILGRIM), this is a collection of travel sketches from his journeys around Europe in 1872-1874. This copy is in the first binding state, with "J.R. Osgood & Co." at the foot of the spine (later copies read "Houghton, Osgood & Co." and then "Houghton, Mifflin & Co."). The cloth color is terra-cotta; other copies were in purple or green, without priority. It is a bright, near-fine copy (minor rubbing at the corners). Supino 2.4.0; Edel & Laurence A2a; Blanck 10530.

$450.00

MY MISCELLANIES
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MY MISCELLANIES

By Collins, Wilkie

1863. [a handsome set] In Two Volumes. London: Sampson, Low, Son, & Co., 1863. 16 pp ads dated Nov 1863 in each volume. Original green cloth with spines stamped in gilt. First Edition of this collection of twenty-five essays, sketches and other pieces (including some fiction). All of them had initially appeared between 1856 and 1861 either in "Household Words" or in "All The Year Round," the two periodicals founded and edited by Collins's brother's father-in-law, Charles Dickens. (Collins's most famous works, THE WOMAN IN WHITE and THE MOONSTONE, also first appeared in "All The Year Round.") Most of the pieces are categorized by Collins as "Sketches of Character," "Nooks and Corners of History," "Social Grievances," "Curiosities of Literature," "Fragments of Personal Experience" and "Cases Worth Looking At." Andrew Gasson in his bibliography provides a one-clause recap of each piece, enough to get across that many demonstrate Collins's wit and his disdain for Victorian sensibilities -- for example "Talk Stoppers" details "enemies to the art of conversation," "A Journey in Search of Nothing" constitutes "reflections on the difficulties of enforced idleness," "Give Us Room!" covers "the dangers of crinoline and overcrowding at parties...," and "Save Me From My Friends" is "a wry look at the disruptive influence on a writer of too many well-meaning friends." This title also appears in Hubin's bibliography of crime fiction, due to such pieces as "The Poisoned Meal" and "The Cauldron of Oil," based on real crimes. These volumes, as issued without half-titles, are in the primary binding of "grass-green diagonal-wide-bead-grain cloth, greenish buff endpapers," as described by Sadleir -- with the first-state ads; most copies we hear of either are rebound or are in the secondary brown cloth binding (with Chapman & Hall ads) from about a decade later. Condition is bright and just about fine (the volumes are slightly askew, but there is no external soil or wear other than one faint droplet-mark on a front cover); near the gutter of each front free endpaper is the remnant of an affixed leaf that included numbers down the left (visible) edge. Gasson pp 111-112; Parrish pp 51-53; Sadleir 599; Wolff 1369; Hubin p. 88.

$3750.00

FIGHTING FRANCE. From Dunkerque to Belfort
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FIGHTING FRANCE. From Dunkerque to Belfort

By Wharton, Edith

1915. Illustrated [with photographs]. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1915. Original red cloth First and Only Edition, first printing, first (American) issue -- the rest of the first printing formed the Canadian edition, and the second and last printing formed the UK edition, all in 1915. After Wharton's 1913 divorce, she moved permanently to France, and did not flee when war broke out a year later; indeed she became highly involved in the French war effort, setting up women's workrooms and raising funds for Belgian refugees. Through her various connections, Wharton was one of few foreigners allowed to visit the front lines in France. She made five separate trips in 1915, which were later published as articles and then compiled together in Fighting France, which became an American bestseller. Wharton's writing on the bleak realities of war was on its own in America, when the nation was attempting to keep its distance from the war, and Wharton was determined to shed light on the consequences being suffered by countries who needed help [Redwood]. Though a "bestseller," there were just two printings divided up for the US, Canada and the UK -- making this one of Edith Wharton's scarcer books. Included are thirteen photographs, one of which (the frontispiece) shows the author, armed with a parasol, at a French palisade on the front. Condition is very good-plus (front cover quite clean and bright, spine a little faded as usual, dent-mark across the rear cover). Garrison A23.I.a.

$100.00

A TRAMP ABROAD
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A TRAMP ABROAD

By Twain, Mark

1880. In Two Volumes. Third Edition. London: Chatto & Windus, 1880. 32 pp Vol II ads dated April 1880. Original brown-ochre cloth decorated in black. First English Edition, third printing (with "Third Edition" on the title pages). This was Twain's only "two decker" work, which in our experience is one of the scarcest of all Twain editions: Blanck cited its existence but could not describe it, and it is pointedly absent from the collections covered by the McBride bibliography. The first printing was issued in April 1880 but generally has ads dated February; our educated guess is that the first printing consisted of probably 500 and certainly no more than 750 copies. It is possible that ALL of the three editions' copies were printed at the same time, and then bound up (with amended title pages) as demand merited. This "third edition" -- identical to the first except for the edition statement on the title page -- has ads dated April (as does the "Second Edition"). In August 1880, Chatto & Windus published the book in one volume -- which, due to the scarcity of all three two-volume "editions," is often collected as the first English edition. Condition is bright and close to fine (one little droplet-mark on a front cover). See Blanck 3386 (final note); not mentioned in McBride.

$750.00

THE MIRROR OF THE SEA
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THE MIRROR OF THE SEA

By Conrad, Joseph

1906. New York and London: Harper & Brothers, 1906. Original blue cloth pictorially decorated in yellow, grey and brown. First (American) Edition, published on the same day as the London one. This was Conrad's first volume of autobiographical non-fiction. This copy is in Cagle's binding "a," with the smaller (17x11mm) anchor-and-rope device on the front cover -- probably the earlier binding state, and certainly the one more-frequently encountered. This is a near-fine copy, with just a touch of rubbing at the extremities. Cagle A11b.

$295.00

SCHOLAR GIPSIES

By Buchan, John

1896. London: John Lane / New York: Macmillan & Co., 1896. 16 pp ads dated 1896. Original light brown cloth decorated in dark brown, with dark brown cloth spine elaborately decorated in gilt. First Edition of Buchan's second book, a volume of sixteen essays, preceded only by his SIR QUIXOTE OF THE MOORS of 1895. Buchan notes in his "Prefatory" that these pieces "were all written in youth, when a man's thoughts run on many diverse things with a certain tentative aim," and also that "they were written in close connection with that most beautiful country, the upper valley of Tweed, where the grace of old times seems to have long lingered." This is the third volume in the publisher's handsome "Arcady Library" series; it is beautifully illustrated with etchings by D.Y. Cameron (Buchan's Glasgow friend who introduced him to the publisher John Lane), and the cover design (of a goat-footed Pan piping to three nymphs) is by Patten Wilson. This is a remarkably bright copy, fine except for a faint damp-stain at the bottom edge of the covers -- quite an uncommon book in this condition. Blanchard A4.

$295.00

THE KING'S GRACE 1910-1935
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THE KING'S GRACE 1910-1935

By Buchan, John

1935. London: Hodder and Stoughton, (1935). Original beige cloth printed in red and blue, with dust jacket. First Edition (trade issue) of this "picture -- and some slight interpretation" of the reign of King George V, upon the occasion of his Silver Jubilee. Though Buchan observes that the time for an actual biography "has happily not yet come," the King did die only eight months later. (At that time this trade edition was reprinted to include a second epilogue and a photograph of the King's bier.) In addition to this trade issue, there were 500 numbered/signed large paper copies; there were also Canadian trade and signed issues, as well. (The American edition was titled THE PEOPLE'S KING.) This is a fine copy in a near-fine (very slightly soiled) dust jacket -- which is NOT price-clipped, and includes the separate "Daily Mail Book of the Month" wraparound slip. Blanchard A107.

$200.00

EPISODES OF THE GREAT WAR
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EPISODES OF THE GREAT WAR

By Buchan, John

1936. Illustrated. London [etc.]: Thomas Nelson and Sons, (1936). Original blue-grey cloth, with dust jacket. First Edition. This volume is a selection of extracts from Buchan's monumental A HISTORY OF THE GREAT WAR (four volumes, 1921-1922) -- published at a time when Britain was bracing for the next war. Included are eight maps, plus nine plates containing numerous photographs. Two years later this volume was followed up with a companion volume, NAVAL EPISODES OF THE GREAT WAR. This is a fine copy in a near-fine pictorial jacket (unnecessarily reinforced inside at some edges). Blanchard A117.

$200.00

THE NOVEL AND THE FAIRY TALE
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THE NOVEL AND THE FAIRY TALE

By Buchan, John

1931. [Oxford: Oxford University Press,] July 1931. Original grey printed wrappers. First Edition, being "Pamphlet No. 79" of The English Association. This was Buchan's "presidential address" delivered to the association on November 22, 1930. He touches upon such writers as George Eliot, Dickens, Thackeray and Coleridge. A very good-plus copy (two small holes near the spine, as for a ring binder). Blanchard A90.

$45.00

THE FIRST EDITIONS OF JOHN BUCHAN [by Blanchard]
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THE FIRST EDITIONS OF JOHN BUCHAN [by Blanchard]

By (Buchan, John)

1981. A Collector's Bibliography. [By:] Robert G. Blanchard. (Hamden CT:) Archon Books, 1981. Original green cloth. First Edition of what is still today the standard bibliography of the first editions of John Buchan -- a comprehensive work covering Buchan's books and pamphlets, his edited works, and his contributions to periodicals. This copy is fine (as new), as issued without dust jacket.

$100.00

AMERICAN NOTES for General Circulation
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AMERICAN NOTES for General Circulation

By Dickens, Charles

1842. Boz' Works -- No. 21. Philadelphia: Lea and Blanchard, 1842. Original self-wrapper (serving as title page); lacking the rear wrapper. Fourth American Edition (just two days after the first!) -- second issue. As first put forth in a 1975 article by Peter Bracher and soon to be confirmed in Walter Smith's upcoming bibliography, this edition was published on November 9th, 1842 (two days after Winchester's "New World" edition and Wilson's "Brother Jonathan" edition -- and one day after Harper's edition). Dickens was so upset by the lack of an international copyright law, he forewent any negotiations with American publishers -- which is why none of these publishers had advance sheets, and all simply had to wait in the harbor for the first boat to arrive with copies of the UK edition (published October 19th), and then rush to press. This Lea and Blanchard edition has 103 pages of double-column text -- actually 107 pages, because inserted between pages 88 and 89 are the two leaves containing pages 85* through 89*, a portion of text that the printers in their rush had omitted. It was initially published on November 9th, with a frontispiece portrait of Dickens and with "With a Portrait of the Author" on the title page/front wrapper; it was priced at 25 cents, double the "New World" and "Brother Jonathan" prices -- i.e., doomed. Thus on the very next day, the 10th, L&B announced a "new edition" (but really just altered copies priced at 12-1/2 cents) withOUT the portrait and with the pertinent line on the title page heavily inked out. This is such a second-issue copy (the heavy swath of ink gradually ate away that part of the title leaf, leaving a long narrow hole that has since been backed by archival paper). This copy was apparently once bound up in something more substantial, and now lacks its rear wrapper; the front leaf and final leaf have significant edge-wear. In our experience this is the scarcest, and the most fragile, of the four earliest American editions. Not in Podeschi (Yale); not in Carr (UTexas) B479; not noted by Wilkins.

$675.00

AMERICAN NOTES for General Circulation
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AMERICAN NOTES for General Circulation

By Dickens, Charles

1842. New-York: Harper & Brothers, 1842. 4 pp ads dated Nov 2, 1842. Original brown printed wrappers. Third American Edition (just one day after the first!) of this book that resulted from Dickens's 1842 tour of America. As first put forth in a 1975 article by Peter Bracher and soon to be confirmed in Walter Smith's upcoming bibliography, this edition was published on November 8th, 1842 (the day after Winchester's "New World" edition and Wilson's "Brother Jonathan" edition -- but the day before Lea & Blanchard's (fourth American) edition. Dickens was so upset by the lack of an international copyright law, he forewent any negotiations with American publishers -- which is why none of these publishers had advance sheets, and all simply had to wait in the harbor for the first boat to arrive with copies of the UK edition (published October 19th), and then rush to press. This Harper edition bears the date November 2nd on the ads and on the inside rear wrapper, but, as the above bibliographers have researched, such a date is not necessarily the publication date (when the book is actually available to the public). A curiosity of this edition is that although prices on the rear and inside covers are in cents, the front cover states "price one shilling." This is a very good-plus copy, with minor wear at the extremities (rear wrapper a bit darkened, minor foxing throughout as usual). Podeschi (Yale) A67; Carr (UTexas) B479; Wilkins p. 24.

$375.00

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