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SCHOLAR GIPSIES

By Buchan, John

1896. London: John Lane / New York: Macmillan & Co., 1896. 16 pp ads dated 1896. Original light brown cloth decorated in dark brown, with dark brown cloth spine elaborately decorated in gilt. First Edition of Buchan's second book, a volume of sixteen essays, preceded only by his SIR QUIXOTE OF THE MOORS of 1895. Buchan notes in his "Prefatory" that these pieces "were all written in youth, when a man's thoughts run on many diverse things with a certain tentative aim," and also that "they were written in close connection with that most beautiful country, the upper valley of Tweed, where the grace of old times seems to have long lingered." This is the third volume in the publisher's handsome "Arcady Library" series; it is beautifully illustrated with etchings by D.Y. Cameron (Buchan's Glasgow friend who introduced him to the publisher John Lane), and the cover design (of a goat-footed Pan piping to three nymphs) is by Patten Wilson.~This is a remarkably bright copy, fine except for a faint damp-stain at the bottom edge of the covers -- quite an uncommon book in this condition. Blanchard A4.

$295.00

THE KING'S GRACE 1910-1935
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THE KING'S GRACE 1910-1935

By Buchan, John

1935. London: Hodder and Stoughton, (1935). Original beige cloth printed in red and blue, with dust jacket. First Edition (trade issue) of this "picture -- and some slight interpretation" of the reign of King George V, upon the occasion of his Silver Jubilee. Though Buchan observes that the time for an actual biography "has happily not yet come," the King did die only eight months later. (At that time this trade edition was reprinted to include a second epilogue and a photograph of the King's bier.)~In addition to this trade issue, there were 500 numbered/signed large paper copies; there were also Canadian trade and signed issues, as well. (The American edition was titled THE PEOPLE'S KING.)~This is a fine copy in a near-fine (very slightly soiled) dust jacket -- which is NOT price-clipped, and includes the separate "Daily Mail Book of the Month" wraparound slip. Blanchard A107.

$200.00

EPISODES OF THE GREAT WAR
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EPISODES OF THE GREAT WAR

By Buchan, John

1936. Illustrated. London [etc.]: Thomas Nelson and Sons, (1936). Original blue-grey cloth, with dust jacket. First Edition. This volume is a selection of extracts from Buchan's monumental A HISTORY OF THE GREAT WAR (four volumes, 1921-1922) -- published at a time when Britain was bracing for the next war. Included are eight maps, plus nine plates containing numerous photographs. Two years later this volume was followed up with a companion volume, NAVAL EPISODES OF THE GREAT WAR.~This is a fine copy in a near-fine pictorial jacket (unnecessarily reinforced inside at some edges). Blanchard A117.

$200.00

THE NOVEL AND THE FAIRY TALE
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THE NOVEL AND THE FAIRY TALE

By Buchan, John

1931. [Oxford: Oxford University Press,] July 1931. Original grey printed wrappers. First Edition, being "Pamphlet No. 79" of The English Association. This was Buchan's "presidential address" delivered to the association on November 22, 1930. He touches upon such writers as George Eliot, Dickens, Thackeray and Coleridge. A very good-plus copy (two small holes near the spine, as for a ring binder). Blanchard A90.

$45.00

THE FIRST EDITIONS OF JOHN BUCHAN [by Blanchard]
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THE FIRST EDITIONS OF JOHN BUCHAN [by Blanchard]

By (Buchan, John)

1981. A Collector's Bibliography. [By:] Robert G. Blanchard. (Hamden CT:) Archon Books, 1981. Original green cloth. First Edition of what is still today the standard bibliography of the first editions of John Buchan -- a comprehensive work covering Buchan's books and pamphlets, his edited works, and his contributions to periodicals. This copy is fine (as new), as issued without dust jacket.

$200.00

TYPEE: A Peep at Polynesian Life
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TYPEE: A Peep at Polynesian Life

By Melville, Herman

1849. during a Four Months' Residence in a Valley of the Marquesas; the Revised Edition, with a Sequel. New York: Harper & Brothers | London: John Murray, 1849. 9 pp undated ads (primarily for OMOO). Original blind-stamped dark blue-green cloth. "The Revised Edition, with a Sequel," first Harper printing. TYPEE was Melville's first book, first published in 1846, a nonfiction (but romanticized) account of his own 1842 experiences as a crewmember on the whaling ship Acushnet, and of the desertion by himself and Richard Tobias ("Toby") Greene at Nukuheva Island in the Marquesas. Melville escaped from the (cannibalistic) Tai Pi people on an Australian merchant ship just a month later; when TYPEE first came out four years later, he still thought "Toby" had succumbed to the Tai Pi -- but soon after publication, the two were reunited. Thus Melville "revised" TYPEE to include "A Sequel" -- "The Story of Toby," which came out later in 1846.~There were several printings of this "Revised Edition" during the years 1846-1848, all by the original publisher Wiley & Putnam; in the Spring of 1847, Harper became Melville's American publisher with the appearance of his second book OMOO, and this first Harper printing of TYPEE came out in 1849. (Two years later, Harper would be Melville's publisher for MOBY-DICK.) Included is the frontispiece map of the Marquesas, and both the original Preface and the Preface to the Revised Edition.~This copy is in dark blue-green cloth, one of several cloth colors used without precedence; copies were also issued in wrappers. Condition is near-fine (a few tiny nicks in the spine ends, a faint glass-ring on the front cover). Blanck 13723.

$325.00

AMERICAN NOTES for General Circulation
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AMERICAN NOTES for General Circulation

By Dickens, Charles

1842. Boz' Works -- No. 21. Philadelphia: Lea and Blanchard, 1842. Original self-wrapper (serving as title page); lacking the rear wrapper. Fourth American Edition (just two days after the first!) -- second issue. As first put forth in a 1975 article by Peter Bracher and soon to be confirmed in Walter Smith's upcoming bibliography, this edition was published on November 9th, 1842 (two days after Winchester's "New World" edition and Wilson's "Brother Jonathan" edition -- and one day after Harper's edition). Dickens was so upset by the lack of an international copyright law, he forewent any negotiations with American publishers -- which is why none of these publishers had advance sheets, and all simply had to wait in the harbor for the first boat to arrive with copies of the UK edition (published October 19th), and then rush to press.~This Lea and Blanchard edition has 103 pages of double-column text -- actually 107 pages, because inserted between pages 88 and 89 are the two leaves containing pages 85* through 89*, a portion of text that the printers in their rush had omitted. It was initially published on November 9th, with a frontispiece portrait of Dickens and with "With a Portrait of the Author" on the title page/front wrapper; it was priced at 25 cents, double the "New World" and "Brother Jonathan" prices -- i.e., doomed. Thus on the very next day, the 10th, L&B announced a "new edition" (but really just altered copies priced at 12-1/2 cents) withOUT the portrait and with the pertinent line on the title page heavily inked out.~This is such a second-issue copy (the heavy swath of ink gradually ate away that part of the title leaf, leaving a long narrow hole that has since been backed by archival paper). This copy was apparently once bound up in something more substantial, and now lacks its rear wrapper; the front leaf and final leaf have significant edge-wear. In our experience this is the scarcest, and the most fragile, of the four earliest American editions. Not in Podeschi (Yale); not in Carr (UTexas) B479; not noted by Wilkins.

$675.00

RAMBLES BEYOND RAILWAYS; or, Notes in Cornwall taken a-foot
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RAMBLES BEYOND RAILWAYS; or, Notes in Cornwall taken a-foot

By Collins, W. Wilkie

1851. With Illustrations by Henry C. Brandling. London: Richard Bentley, 1851. Original blind-stamped light ochre-brown cloth. First Edition of Wilkie Collins's third book -- following his 1848 memoir of his father, and his 1850 Fifth-Century romance ANTONINA. RAMBLES is Collins's account of his 1850 walking tour with his artist friend Henry Brandling -- who provided the twelve tinted lithograph plates for the book.~"RAMBLES became an amiable mixture of travelogue, vivid descriptive writing, Cornish history and legend, and social observation" [Gasson]. Legendary accounts include that of a plague of rats, brought to Looe by a wrecked ship; the local people ultimately solved the problem by coming up with a tasty recipe for rats smothered in onions. Some of the other accounts would show up years later as features in some of Collins's fiction, such as the 1852 novel BASIL and the supernatural story "Mad Monkton."~This copy is in very good-plus condition (minor cover soil, very light wear around the spine ends). The volume remains tight, and it retains the original endpapers printed with ads (the rear one is a slightly cracked at the gutter). Although RAMBLES sold well (a "second edition" would come out the following year), this is still very early Collins -- long before he would become well-known for his fiction -- and as such, this is a scarce title to find in original cloth. Parrish & Miller pp 14-16; Gasson pp 129-130.

$1250.00

AMERICAN NOTES for General Circulation
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AMERICAN NOTES for General Circulation

By Dickens, Charles

1842. New-York: Harper & Brothers, 1842. 4 pp ads dated Nov 2, 1842. Original brown printed wrappers. Third American Edition (just one day after the first!) of this book that resulted from Dickens's 1842 tour of America. As first put forth in a 1975 article by Peter Bracher and soon to be confirmed in Walter Smith's upcoming bibliography, this edition was published on November 8th, 1842 (the day after Winchester's "New World" edition and Wilson's "Brother Jonathan" edition -- but the day before Lea & Blanchard's (fourth American) edition. Dickens was so upset by the lack of an international copyright law, he forewent any negotiations with American publishers -- which is why none of these publishers had advance sheets, and all simply had to wait in the harbor for the first boat to arrive with copies of the UK edition (published October 19th), and then rush to press.~This Harper edition bears the date November 2nd on the ads and on the inside rear wrapper, but, as the above bibliographers have researched, such a date is not necessarily the publication date (when the book is actually available to the public). A curiosity of this edition is that although prices on the rear and inside covers are in cents, the front cover states "price one shilling."~This is a very good-plus copy, with minor wear at the extremities (rear wrapper a bit darkened, minor foxing throughout as usual). Podeschi (Yale) A67; Carr (UTexas) B479; Wilkins p. 24.

$375.00

MEMOIRS OF THE LIFE OF WILLIAM COLLINS, Esq., R.A.
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MEMOIRS OF THE LIFE OF WILLIAM COLLINS, Esq., R.A.

By Collins, W. Wilkie

1848. With Selections from his Journals and Correspondence. By His Son. [in Two Volumes.] London: Longman, Brown, Green, and Longmans, 1848. 32 pp Vol I ads dated April 29, 1848. Original blind-stamped dark purple-brown cloth. First Edition of Wilkie Collins's first book -- a memoir of his father the landscape and genre painter, the popularity of whose works then rivaled that of J.M.W. Turner or John Constable. Though heading uncertainly toward a career as a barrister, 23-year-old Wilkie was partway through writing a classical romance to be titled ANTONINA when his father died in February 1847 -- so he paused to write this memoir (actually published in November 1848, despite the date of the ad catalogue). The work is dedicated to Sir Robert Peel, who had been the Patron of William Collins, and includes (in addition to a portrait of William) an engraved title page in each volume, each portraying a work of art by William.~This copy is still in the original delicate purple-brown cloth, with the original pale-yellow endpapers. Condition is very good (some wear at the spine and joint ends, but the volumes remain tight and quite presentable). Due to the fragility of this binding (the 1840s was the first real decade of cloth bindings in the UK), Wilkie Collins's first work usually turns up rebound in half calf -- so this is a pleasing survival. Parrish & Miller pp 6-11; Gasson pp 102-103.

$875.00

AMERICAN NOTES for General Circulation. "The New World."
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AMERICAN NOTES for General Circulation. "The New World."

By Dickens, Charles

1842. [with the RARE outer wrapper] First American Edition. New-York: J. Winchester, Publisher, November 1842. Original self-wrappers, with additional outer wrapper. "First American Edition" -- second impression. As confirmed first in a 1975 article by Peter Bracher and (soon) in Walter Smith's upcoming bibliography), this edition (12-1/2 cents) was published at 2:00 PM on Monday, November 7, 1842 -- just TWO HOURS before the "Brother Jonathan Extra" edition (12-1/2 cents) managed to get out on the streets. Harper got its edition (12-1/2 cents) out by early or mid-afternoon on the following day (Tuesday the 8th), and Lea & Blanchard of Philadelphia had an edition (first 25 cents, then 12-1/2) on the streets by Wednesday the 9th. (L&B was the only one of these American publishers to have had a prior agreement with Dickens for publication in America -- but Dickens was so upset by the lack of an international copyright law, he forewent any such negotiations -- which is why none of these publishers had advance sheets, and all simply had to wait in the harbor for the first boat to arrive with the UK edition (published in October), and then rush to press. The Winchester publication occupies 46 pages of double-column text (followed by one leaf of ads).~The first impression was originally issued without an outer wrapper. This copy is from Winchester's second impression (not so stated) -- which first came out around November 19th (a few minor differences include having "Number 32,33" printed correctly in the heading, and having "THE END" centered on page 46). Some later copies of this impression came with a decorative wrapper -- and this is such a copy. The wrapper's front cover reads "FIVE POINTS LITERATURE | "BOZ" | RAISING THE "DICKENS" WITH AMERICA | OR | HOW TO USE UP THE YANKEES. | A NOVEL IN ONE VOLUME. | PRICE 12 1/2 CENTS." A new title! A new sub-title! And it is now a novel! As Walter Smith observes (in his upcoming bibliography), the rear cover lists several British novels currently in serialization, which are/will be issued in "New World" supplements as available: one of these is MARTIN CHUZZLEWIT, which began its "New World" serialization in January 1843 -- so this wrapper was added sometime on or after that date. As Smith also points out, there may be other states of this wrapper, but this (the Smith copy) is the only documented example, so we don't know.~Condition is very good -- with substantial edge-wear mainly around the spine. A remarkable survival.~Bracher (Bibliographical Society of America Vol 69) pp 365-376; curiously not in Podeschi (Yale); Carr (UTexas) B477(2); Wilkins pp 23-24.

$1150.00

AMERICAN NOTES for General Circulation. "The New World."
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AMERICAN NOTES for General Circulation. "The New World."

By Dickens, Charles

1842. First American Edition. New-York: J. Winchester, Publisher, November 1842. Original self-wrappers, bound into very early plain blue wrappers. "First American Edition" -- second impression. As first put forth in a 1975 article by Peter Bracher and (soon) to be confirmed in Walter Smith's upcoming bibliography, this edition (12-1/2 cents) was published at 2:00 PM on Monday, November 7, 1842 -- just TWO HOURS before the "Brother Jonathan Extra" edition (12-1/2 cents) managed to get out on the streets. Harper got its edition (12-1/2 cents) out by early or mid-afternoon on the following day (Tuesday the 8th), and Lea & Blanchard of Philadelphia had an edition (first 25 cents, then 12-1/2) on the streets by Wednesday the 9th. (L&B was the only one of these American publishers to have had a prior agreement with Dickens for publication in America -- but Dickens was so upset by the lack of an international copyright law, he forewent any such negotiations -- which is why none of these publishers had advance sheets, and all simply had to wait in the harbor for the first boat to arrive with the UK edition (published in October), and then rush to press.~The Winchester publication occupies 46 pages of double-column text (followed by one leaf of ads); it was originally issued without an outer wrapper. This copy is actually from Winchester's second impression (not so stated) -- which came out around November 19th (a few minor differences include having "Number 32,33" printed correctly in the heading, and having "THE END" centered on page 46). Some later copies of this impression came with a decorative wrapper, but not this one; the first owner ("William B. Stafford | 1842 | Waterville, N.Y.") added this plain blue wrapper which he quickly signed and dated thrice. (This wrapper could easily be removed, but in our opinion its early dated signatures add something.)~Condition is very good, the only flaw being where extra stitching was used to add the blue wrapper; it may be that there was initially a more substantial binding, for which these blue wrappers served as endpapers. In any case -- this is a scarce piece.~Bracher (Bibliographical Society of America Vol 69) pp 365-376; curiously not in Podeschi (Yale); Carr (UTexas) B477(2); Wilkins pp 23-24.

$575.00

A BOOK OF ESCAPES and Hurried Journeys
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A BOOK OF ESCAPES and Hurried Journeys

By Buchan, John

1923. With Illustrations. Boston and New York: Houghton Mifflin Company, 1923. Original tan cloth pictorially decorated in black, green, and red. First American Edition. This is a retelling of a dozen true historical events that involved "escapes and hurried journeys" all over the world (Scotland, South Africa, Turkestan, Australia...), illustrated with eight plates by A.S. Forrest. The book was subsequently reprinted as a text-book, with additional questions and exercises not by Buchan. This is a handsomely bound book: the four-color pictorial scene wraps around from the front cover onto the spine. A fine copy, remarkably clean, virtually as new except for faint evidence of a small book-label on the front endpaper. See Blanchard A54 (note).

$225.00

THE BATTLE OF THE SOMME. [First AND Second Phases.]
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THE BATTLE OF THE SOMME. [First AND Second Phases.]

By Buchan, John

1916. [Together, two volumes.] London: Thomas Nelson & Sons, n.d. [1916 & 1917]. Original paper-covered boards and original wrappers, respectively. First Editions of Buchan's account of the war effort. Buchan had joined the Nelson publishing firm as literary adviser in 1905 (due in large part to his friendship with Oxford classmate Tommy Nelson -- killed in action in April 1917). These volumes are filled with maps and also with photographs of the Somme battle sites, including a number of action ones showing British soldiers "crossing the parapets," tanks overrunning obstacles, mines exploding, etc.~The first volume was bound in paper-covered heavy boards; the second was available (without priority) in either paper-covered thin boards or, as here, heavy wrappers. These are very good copies, with some edge-wear as would be expected on these fragile volumes; typically, both volumes are found with most of their spine paper lacking, but here most of it is present. Blanchard A40 & A41.

$325.00

THE AFRICAN COLONY. Studies in the Reconstruction

By Buchan, John

1903. Edinburgh and London: William Blackwood and Sons, 1903. Original dark blue cloth. First Edition, first binding (some copies were put up in a green Times Book Club binding). As the Boer War wound down in 1901, Buchan received a two-year appointment to assist Lord Milner in the reconstruction of the Colony.~Buchan, who had not been enthusiastic about the war, believing that the British, on balance, 'were only just in the right,' was enthusiastic about the reconstruction and entirely in sympathy with Milner's objectives. [Smith]~This is Buchan's survey of the situation in South Africa after the war, with his thoughts about what should be done next. Included are two large foldout color maps -- one of "South Africa" and one of "The New Colonies." The volume is bright and near-fine (very slightly rubbed at the extremities). Blanchard A15 (citing only one foldout map, not two).

$375.00

HUNTING SKETCHES
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HUNTING SKETCHES

By Trollope, Anthony

1865. [with October 1864 ads] London: Chapman and Hall, 1865. 36 pp ads dated October 1864. Original red cloth, beveled. First Edition of this collection of eight sketches about hunting, such as "The Man who Hunts and doesn't Like it" and "The Man who Hunts and does Like it." Trollope frequently employed hunting scenes in his fiction:~Not all Trollope lovers are in sympathy with his long and frequent detailed descriptions of riding with the hounds, but no one in English fiction has done them better. His sense of inferiority, which had grown during his unhappy schooldays and his wasted years at uncongenial tasks at the Post Office, was first dispelled by his participation in the sport of hunting... [Gerould]~Earlier in 1865, these sketches had appeared individually in the "Pall Mall Gazette"; later that year, eight more appeared there, collected the following year in a matching volume titled TRAVELLING SKETCHES.~HUNTING SKETCHES was issued without a half-title, and also without titling on the spine. This copy has, rather than the usual May 1865 ad catalogue, the very uncommon catalogue dated October 1864: Sadleir never saw such a copy, but heard about it and commented "The essays were not even thought of, much less written or published, so early as October 1864" -- so this is a case of the binder using up leftover catalogues. The volume's condition is near-fine with scarcely any wear (spine very slightly darkened). Sadleir (TROLLOPE) 21; Wolff 6781. Housed in a felt-lined clamshell case with leather label.

$475.00

THE ORIGIN OF SPECIES by Means of Natural Selection
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THE ORIGIN OF SPECIES by Means of Natural Selection

By Darwin, Charles

1872. or the preservation of favoured races in the struggle for life. Sixth Edition, with Additions and Corrections. (Eleventh Thousand.) London: John Murray, 1872. Original green cloth. "Sixth Edition (Eleventh Thousand)" -- with important material that had not been in the earlier editions. This is, of course, "certainly the most important biological book ever written" -- the book that made phrases such as "natural selection," "survival of the fittest" and "evolution" part of the language. The 1859 first edition consisted of only 1250 copies, all of which were sold by the end of the day of publication; such copies today typically cost at least $50,000.~Over the next 13 years, second through sixth editions were published, each distinguished by additional material. By the time the Fifth had come out in 1869, a total of 10,000 copies had been published since 1859. This Sixth of 1872 ("usually regarded as the last," because later printings were just stereoplate reprints) consisted of 3,000 copies, but there are three states of the title page, reading "Eleventh" (as here), "Twelfth," and "Thirteenth" Thousand (some of these last being dated 1873).~The Sixth Edition contains a new chapter, VII, "inserted to refute the views of the Roman Catholic biologist St George Mivart"; also a glossary appears for the first time, and the initial word "ON" was dropped from the book's title. But there are other changes as well -- such as (once on page 201 and thrice on page 424) Darwin's first usage of the word "evolution." (The prior edition had seen his first usage of the expression "survival of the fittest.")~This is an attractive, tight copy, with very little evident wear (though the volume does appear to have been recased at some point, with deft, barely-perceptible repair at the spine head). Freeman pp. 73-86 (the source of quotes in this description).

$2500.00

AUTUMN
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AUTUMN

By Thoreau, Henry David

1892. Edited by H.G.O. Blake. Boston and New York: Houghton, Mifflin and Company, 1892. Original dark green cloth with facsimile signature in gilt, beveled. First Edition, which consisted of only 1020 copies (Borst says there were only 500, but Blanck's figure is more likely). This was the last of Thoreau's four "seasons" to be posthumously published from his journal: EARLY SPRING had come out in 1881, followed by SUMMER in 1884; curiously, WINTER came next, in 1888. Even using Blanck's larger number of copies, AUTUMN is one of the two scarcest (EARLY SPRING consisted of 1018 copies, while the other two consisted of 1260 and 1550 respectively).~This is a fine, bright copy with scarcely any wear -- and is quite uncommon thus. Borst A11.1.a; Blanck 20130.

$850.00

MEMORIES AND ADVENTURES
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MEMORIES AND ADVENTURES

By Doyle, Sir Arthur Conan

1924. London: Hodder and Stoughton, [1924]. Original navy blue cloth. First Edition, which consisted of only 2,000 copies (priced at a steep 20 shillings). MEMORIES AND ADVENTURES consists of 32 autobiographical musings -- from memories of Doyle's boyhood, to "Sidelights on Sherlock Holmes," to wartime recollections, to "The Psychic Quest" -- all of them first appearances in book form, most (but not all) having appeared individually in various magazines since 1897. Quoting from Doyle's Preface:~I have known what it was to be a poor man, and I have known what it was to be fairly affluent... I have tried my hand at very many sports, including boxing, cricket, billiards, motoring, football, aeronautics and ski-ing, having been the first to introduce the latter for long journeys into Switzerland. I have travelled as Doctor to a whaler for seven months in the Arctic and afterwards in the West Coast of Africa. I have seen something of three wars, the Soudanese, the South African and the German... Finally I have been constrained to devote my latter years to telling the world the final result of thirty-six years' study of the occult, and in endeavouring to make it realize the overwhelming importance of the question... Such is the life which I have told in some detail in my MEMORIES AND ADVENTURES.~This book, curiously uncommon in any condition, is a remarkably fine, bright copy; we have never seen an example of its dust jacket. Green & Gibson B34a.

$625.00

ON A CHINESE SCREEN
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ON A CHINESE SCREEN

By Maugham, W. Somerset

1922. New York: George H. Doran Company, n.d. [1922]. Original orange paper-covered boards with yellow cloth spine, with red dust jacket. First Edition, consisting of 2000 copies published one month earlier than Heinemann's London edition. These are sketches resulting from Maugham's 1919-1920 trip up the Yangtze River in China; they are not so much sketches about what Maugham saw, but rather about whom he met -- especially Westerners who portray varying degrees of acceptance or resistance to Chinese culture (a friction at the heart of many Maugham novels).~This volume is in fine condition (one tiny chip in the front cover paper); the very uncommon red dust jacket is remarkably near-fine (spine faded as usual for the color red, one very small chip at the foot of the spine). Toole Stott A28a. Housed in a custom cloth slipcase with leather labels.

$875.00

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