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A Dictionary of Books Relating to America, From its Discovery to the Present Time
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A Dictionary of Books Relating to America, From its Discovery to the Present Time

By Joseph Sabin (1821-1881), Wilberforce Eames and Robert W G Vail

29 volumes in 15. Volume 1 & 2: A to Bedford xvi+566 pages with Bedinger to Brownell 574 pages; Volume 3 & 4 Brownell to Chesbrough 574 pages with Cheshire to Costa 574 pages; Volume 5 & 6 Costa Rica to Du Moulin 575 pages with Du Moulin to Franklin 573 pages; Volume 7 & 8 Franklin to Hall 574 pages with Hall to Huntington 574 pages; Volume 9 & 10 Huntington to Lacriox 574 pages with Lacroix to NcClary 574 pages; Volume 11 & 12 McClean to Memoire 582 pages with Memoire to Nederland 582 pages; Volume 13 & 14 Nederland to Omal 582 pages with Omana to Philadelphia 582 pages; Volume 15 & 16 Philadelphia to Providence 582 pages with Providence to Remarks 582 pages; Volume 17 & 18 Remarks to Ross 582 pages with Ross to Schedae 581 pages; Volume 19 & 20 Schedel to Simms 578 pages with Simms to Smith 577 pages; Volume 21 & 22 Smith to Solis y Valenzuela 577 pages with Solis to Spiritual Manifestations 573 pages; Volume 23 & 24 Spiritual Maxims to Storrs 573 pages with Storrs to Ternaux-Compans 571 pages; Volume 25 & 26 Ternaux-Compans to Tucker 571 pages with Tucker to Vindex 571 pages; Volume 27 & 28 Vindex to Weeks 571 pages with Weeks to Witherspoon 571 pages; Volume 29 Witherspoon - Zwey 305 pages. Octavos (8 1/2" x 5 1/2") bound in original publisher's black cloth with red label in gilt lettering to spine. First published in 1836 and completed 1936. Editor varies. Begun by Joseph Sabin, continued by Wilberforce Eames and completed by R. W. G. Vail for the Bibliographical Society of America. Issued in 172 parts with cover titles numbered consecutively, 6 parts forming a volume (except vol. 29, 4 parts). Publication was suspended from 1892 to 1927. Based on Joseph Sabin's landmark bibliography (Bibliotheca Americana: A Dictionary of Books Relating to America from Its Discovery to the Present Time) contains works about the Americas published throughout the world from 1500 to the early 1900's. Included are books, pamphlets, serials and other documents that provide original accounts of exploration, trade, colonialism, slavery and abolition, the western movement, Native Americans, military actions and much more. This collection is a cornerstone in the study of the western hemisphere. Condition: Volume 1 back hinge cracked, corners bumped, some light rubbing to spine else a very good set. This item may require additional postage.

$450.00

An Essay on the Natural History of Guiana
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An Essay on the Natural History of Guiana

By Edward Bartholomew Bancroft (1744-1821)

[8]+iv+402+[2 ad] pages with frontispiece. Octavo (8 1/4" x 5 1/4") bound in contemporary calf with six raised spine bands and gilt ruled edges to covers. (Field 70; Sabin 3106) First edition. Edward Bancroft was a Massachusetts-born physician and chemist who became a double agent, spying for both the United States and Great Britain while serving as secretary to the American Commission in Paris during the American Revolution. On July 14, 1763, after fleeing his apprenticeship, Bancroft left New England for the sugar-producing slave colonies of Dutch Guiana, where he became a plantation doctor. He soon expanded his practice to multiple plantations and wrote a study of the local environment. Based on observations of experiments already being performed on live eels by Dutch colonists in and around Surinam and Essequibo, Bancroft concluded that American eels and torpedo fish discharged electricity to stun their prey, rather than by imperceptibly swift mechanical action, as had previously been argued. Although he left South America in 1766, he published An Essay on the Natural History of Guiana, in South America in London 1769, where with the encouragement of Benjamin Franklin, he embarked on a career as a man of letters. The especial subject of the author's inquiries regarding the Indians, is the nature and use of the Wourali Poison, with which their weapons are charged. Condition: moderate wear, hinges cracked, minor foxing, minimal damp-staining, early owner's signature on title page, later owner's bookplate on front pastedown else a good copy, internally very good.

$750.00

La Florida del Inca. Historia del Adelantado, Hernando de Soto, Governador, y Capitan General del Reino de la Florida. de otros heroicos caballeros, Espanoles, e indios
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La Florida del Inca. Historia del Adelantado, Hernando de Soto, Governador, y Capitan General del Reino de la Florida. de otros heroicos caballeros, Espanoles, e indios

By Vega, Garcilaso de la El Inca (1539-1616)

[xxx]+268+[12] pages with red and black title and index. Small folio (12" x 8 1/4") bound in original vellum with hand lettered title and cover. Third edition. The first edition of the La Florida was published by Pedro Crasbeeck at Lisbon. A reprint of this edition with emendations was made at Madrid in 1723 under the editorship of Andres Gonzalez Baria Carballido y Zuniga, which was quickly sold out and a third edition was published that same year with out the fold out map. Born Gómez Suárez de Figueroa, in Cusco, Peru, in 1539, he was the illegitimate son of a Spanish aristocrat and a royal Inca mother. He was born during the early years of the Spanish conquest. His father was Spanish captain and conquistador Sebastián Garcilaso de la Vega y Vargas. His mother was an Inca princess, Palla Chimpu Ocllo, who was baptized after the fall of Cuzco as Isabel Suárez Chimpu Ocllo. She was descended from Inca nobility, a daughter of Túpac Huallpa and a granddaughter of the powerful Inca Tupac Yupanqui. Because he was illegitimate and the ravages of the conquest were underway, the boy was given only his mother's surname. Under the Spanish system of caste that developed, he would have been classified as a criollo (for being of Spanish descent, born in South America) and mestizo (for his mixed parents).Gómez lived with his mother and her Inca family for the first ten years of his life. His first language was Quecha, but he also learned Spanish from his early years. His father took the boy into his household and gave him some education. Suárez de Figueroa received an inheritance when his father died in 1559. The next year, at 21, he decided to travel to Spain. Suárez de Figueroa reached Spain in 1561 while there was still fighting in his native country under the conquest. The Spanish did not achieve their final victory until 1572. He traveled to Montilla, where he met his father's brother, Alonso de Vargas, who acted as the young man's protector and helped him make his way. The younger man soon traveled to Madrid to seek official acknowledgement as his father's son from the Crown, and he was allowed to take the name of Garcilaso de la Vega. Also referred to as "El Inca" or "Inca Garcilaso de la Vega", he received an informal education in Spain. Together with his uncle's support, gaining his father's name helped him in society. He received a first-rate but informal European education in Spain after he moved there at age 21. His works are considered to have great literary value and are not simple historical chronicles. He wrote from an important perspective, as his maternal family were the ruling Inca. He portrays the Inca as benevolent rulers who governed a country where everybody was well-fed and happy before the Spanish came. Having learned first-hand about daily Inca life from his maternal relatives, he was able to convey that in his writings. As an adult, he also gained the perspective to describe accurately the political system of tribute and labor enforced by the Incas from the subsidiary tribes in their empire. La Florida del Inca is based largely on oral testimony from a participant of the expedition de Soto, Captain Gonzalo Silvestre , a Spanish soldier whom he had met in Cuzco, and later in Spain, when he found an ill old man. It is, therefore, an oral source to which the author considers truthful, since his informant had witnessed the events in person. While working on the first version of his Historia, Garcilaso discovered two short chronicles of two other conquerors, Juan Coles and Alonso de Carmona, who were also in Florida. He incorporated into the body of the text the new data obtained, which culminated his book. However, it is not an exaggeration to say that the main source is the one that he collected from Gonzalo Silvestre's testimony. Although the author claims that his work should be considered historical, he is undoubtedly filled the gaps with his own imagination, which more than enriches it, until it becomes a masterpiece of Castilian narrative. Finally, in December of 1604, Garcilaso empowered Domingo de Silva to seek publication of La Florida which appeared the following year in Lisbon, with the title of La Florida del Inca, and dedicated to the Duke of Braganza, published by Pedro Crasbeeck. Condition: Ties lacking, previous owner's old signature neat at title heal else a very good copy.

$1750.00

The Historie of Travell into Virginia Britania (1612)
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The Historie of Travell into Virginia Britania (1612)

By Strachey, William (1572-1621)

xxxii+221 pages with 3 foldout maps, frontispiece. Octavo (9" x 6") bound in original publisher's blue cloth with gilt lettering to spine and stamped pictorial representation of the ship Victoria in gilt on the cover, blind stamped edge rule to edges. Edited by Louis B. Wright and Virginia Freund. Works issued by the Hakluyt Society, Second Series, Number 103. First edition. Willaim Strachey was born in 1572 in Saffron Walden in Essex. For a century Stracheys had lived in that neighborhood and had gradually risen from the status of yeomen to minor gentry. In pursuit of advancement, he entered Emmanuel College, Cambridge in 1588. In 1605 a record in a deed finds him in London and a member of Gray's Inn, one of the most important of the Inns of Court. In 1595 he married and appears to have had a modest annuity but the records do not make clear how he subsisted. After his father and stepmother died he came into the inheritance, but was not sufficient to keep him out of financial difficulties. He was active in the London theater scene during his period at Gray's Inn and probably knew Ben Johnson, John Marston and William Shakespeare who later used material from Strachey in The Tempest. Because of his financial difficulty he became secretary to Thomas Glover and sailed with him in the Levant Company's ship. After his trip with Glover to the Mediterranean he returned home and again in need of money. To raise money he planned a trip to the New World. At this time the Virginia Company of London was organizing the largest expedition which had yet sailed to the colony on the James River. The fleet sailed from Plymouth in June 1609. When the fleet was within seven or eight days' sailing of Cape Henry disaster struck. An "huricano" hit the fleet and scattered them from Bermuda to Virginia. The best account of the disaster was written by Strachey of which part was used by Shakespeare in The Tempest. The Sea Venture, which Strachey was on, was beached and the whole company got safely ashore. They built two ships and finally reached the James River in May eleven months after leaving Plymouth. Strachey's honest and forthright description of the adventure and what they found at Jamestown help explain why the Virginia Company would not want the True Reportory published. He returned to England in the early fall of 1611. Shortly after landing, he prepared for publication a set of the laws proclaimed by Gates, De La Warr and Sir Thomas Dale, who succeeded De La Warr. The work was entitled For the Colony in Virginea Britannia. Lawes Dine, Moral and Martiall, &c and appeared in 1612. Condition: Moderate rubbing to extremities, some pages uncut, previous owner's name on front end paper, book plate on front paste down. A very good copy lacking jacket.

$20.00

Enchiridion canonico-morale de confessario ad inhonesta, & turpia solicitante: nec non de decretis, & constitutionibus pontificiis ad hoc nefarium crimen exterminandum emanantis
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Enchiridion canonico-morale de confessario ad inhonesta, & turpia solicitante: nec non de decretis, & constitutionibus pontificiis ad hoc nefarium crimen exterminandum emanantis

By Vilaplana, Hermenegildo (1712-1763)

[38]+217+[15 unnumbered] pages with index. Duodecimo (6" x 4") bound in original limp velum lacking ties and ink title to spine. (Medina, Mexico, 5026; Palau 365782) First edition. Father Vilaplana, a native of Benimarfull, Valencia, Spain, was a Franciscan, a university lecturer where he studied philosophy and theology before coming to America as a Franciscan missionary, attached to the colleges in Queretaro and Zacatecas. He wrote histories of all of the Franciscan colleges in New Spain and was a member of the Inquisition. Notably, one the earliest biographies of the apostle to Texas, Fr. Antonio Margil, was written by Vilaplana in 1763. The Enchiridion is a "handbook" which gives examples of abuses, lays out the pertinent canon laws and papal edicts, and has a section of questions to be asked of accused priests during court proceedings. The work also discusses punishment and other disciplines that the crimes demand. Condition: Front gutter pulled away from vellum, ties lacking, corners bumped, worming to latter part of work from page 203 to the end affecting some text else about very good.

$1000.00

Florilegio medicinal de todas las enfermedades: sacado de varios, y clasicos authores, para bien de los pobres, y de los que tienen falta de medicos, en particular para provincians remotas ... Reducido â tres libros, el primero de medicina, el segundo de syrugia ... El tercero contiene vn cathalogo de los medicamentos vssuales, que se hazen en la botica, con el mondo de componerlos
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Florilegio medicinal de todas las enfermedades: sacado de varios, y clasicos authores, para bien de los pobres, y de los que tienen falta de medicos, en particular para provincians remotas ... Reducido â tres libros, el primero de medicina, el segundo de syrugia ... El tercero contiene vn cathalogo de los medicamentos vssuales, que se hazen en la botica, con el mondo de componerlos

By Juan de Esteyneffer (1664-1716)

[32]+535 pages with indices. Octavo (8 1/4" x 6") bound in original vellum with hand-written title to spine and ties. (Palua 84238) Second Spanish edition, first published in Mexico (1712) and Spain (1719). Juan de Esteyneffer was a Moravian German lay Jesuit missionary sent to the New World. He is known for his 1711 work Florilegio Medicinal, which compiled a combination of New World traditional medicine, European materia medica, and 18th-century European medical diagnosis. Esteyneffer was born in Iglau, Moravia. His original German name is unclear; Juan de Esteyneffer was its rendering in Spanish, and the last name is also variously given as Steinhofer, Steinhöfer, Steinheffer, Steineffer, or Estainefer. He joined the Jesuits on September 27, 1686, and studied pharmacy in Brno. He was sent to the Jesuit College at Chihuahua to help care for elderly and ill missionaries. While there, he compiled the Florilegio medicinal, completing it in 1711, with a first publication in 1712 (Mexico: Heirs of J. J. Guillena Carrascoso, 1712). The work combined traditional European and New World medical lore with what was then modern medical science, and anthropologist Margarita Artschwager Kay posits that it served to standardize herbal therapy in Northern Mexico and the Southwestern United States. The work contains much interesting information respecting the diseases common among the Mexican and Southwestern Indians, along with a discussion of the medicinal use of local plants and herbs, including a vocabulary in Spanish and the native Mexican language. The preface sates that the work was prepared especially for the use of the Jesuit fathers in the provinces of Topia, Tapequanes, Taraumara, Sonora and California, which were without doctors or medical facilities. Condition: bottom tie broken, some internal soiling else about very good of a rare medical piece.

$3000.00

Moeurs des sauvages amériquains, comparées aux moeurs des premiers temps
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Moeurs des sauvages amériquains, comparées aux moeurs des premiers temps

By Lafitau, Joseph François (1681-1746)

2 volumes. [8]+610 pages with frontispiece, map and 18 plates; [12]+[14]+490+[42] pages with 23 plates and index. Quarto (10 1/2" x 8") recased in original leather with five raised bands with red labels to spine in gilt lettering. (Alden & Landis 724/97; Field 850; Howes L-22; Lande 494; Sabin 38596; Staton & Tremaine/TPL 158; Streeter sale I:121) First edition. Joseph-François Lafitau was a French Jesuit missionary, ethnologist, and naturalist. He is best known for his use of the comparative method in the field of scientific anthropology, the discovery of ginseng, and his writings on the Iroquois. Lafitau was the first of the Jesuit missionaries in Canada to have a scientific point of view. Lafitau is best known for his important discoveries on the Iroquois society. He arrived in Quebec in 1711 amidst a period of hostility between the Five Nations prior to the signing of the Treaty of Utrecht. The woods were deemed unsafe for travelers and therefore he was ordered to join the Iroquois on the south shore of the St. Lawrence valley in Sault St. Louis, also known as Kahnawake. Sault St. Louis already shared a great tradition with both the members of his order and the Iroquois by the time Lafitau arrived. He noticed the importance of women in Iroquois society, the universality of marriage as an institution, age grading, the classificatory system of relationship, and the pulse of Indian politics in the town council. Lafitau also contributed to existing scholarship on the Iroquois Long-house; he details the rules of residence and social organization. Lafitau's observations provide a greater understanding of Iroquois kinship and exogamy. His major work, Moeurs des Sauvages Amériquains, written in French, was first published in 1724 in Paris. It is entitled Customs of the American Indians Compared with the Customs of Primitive Times and is 1,100 pages in total. In 1974, Dr. William Fenton and Dr. Elizabeth Moore translated and edited the work as part of the Champlain Society's General Series. Condition: Recased, edge wear, very occasional spotting, new end-papers else a very good copy.

$6000.00

Algemeine Geschichte der Lander und Völker von Amerika
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Algemeine Geschichte der Lander und Völker von Amerika

By Schroter, Johann Friedrich (1710-1788)

2 volumes. [xlviii]+688 pages with frontispiece and 41 plates; [xxii]+905+[ 63] pages with 18 plates (15 folding], 8 maps (.5 folding), bibliography and index. Royal octavo (9 3/4" x 8") bound in quarter brown cloth with gilt lettering to spine over blue boards. Compiled and translated by Johann Friedrich Schröter. Introduction by Siegmund Jacob Baumgartens. (Sabin 77989; Howes S200; Borba de Moraes, page 453) First edition. Extensively illustrated cultural and natural history of the Americas, compiled and translated by Johann Friedrich Schröter. The work is illustrated with two large folding maps of North and South America after Delisle. Also included are folding views of Cuzco and Mexico City. Numerous engravings depict various native tribes, their customs, and the flora and fauna of the Americas. The first volume is based on a translation of Lafiteau's Moeurs des Sauvages Ameriquains (Paris, 1724), with accounts of the discovery of the New World and content on the North American Indians. The second volume is a compilation of works including pieces of Charlevoix's Histoire et Description Générale de la Nouvelle France (Paris, 1744), and Rochefort's works dealing with South America. The introduction includes a bibliography of texts on the New World. Condition: Minor wear; toning and foxing to text, corners bumped, spine ends rubbed else a very good copy.

$2000.00

Commentaria Intres Grammaticae Libos Primaam et Secundam Classem tum Discipulis turn Magistro, Complectentes Hispano Idomate cum Appendicibus ei Itindice Copioso Illustrata
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Commentaria Intres Grammaticae Libos Primaam et Secundam Classem tum Discipulis turn Magistro, Complectentes Hispano Idomate cum Appendicibus ei Itindice Copioso Illustrata

By Avila, Francisco de (1573–1647)?

[vi]+450+[1 blank]+19 index] pages. Duodecimo (6" x 4 1/4") bound in period vellum with hand written title to spine. Dedicated to Beato Luis Gonzaga. Original manuscript. The work is attributed to Francisco de Avila. He was curate or vicar in the province of Huarochiri of Peru, later curate at Huánaco, finally Canon of the Church of La Plata (now Sucre), in Bolivia. Born in Peru as a foundling (quorum parentes ignorantur he says himself); date of demise unknown. He was one of the most active investigators of Indian rites and customs of his time. In 1608 he wrote a treatise of the "Errors, False Gods, and Other Superstitions of the Indians of the Provinces of Huarochiri, Mama, and Chaclla", of which unfortunately only the first six chapters are known to exist and have been translated into English. It is, even in its incomplete form, an invaluable contribution to the knowledge of the Peruvian Indians and their primitive lore. In 1611 Avila wrote an equally important report on the Indians of Huánaco in eastern Peru, of which the unpublished manuscript. is extant. Such writings greatly mitigate the charges which the destruction of fetishes and other objects of primitive worship of the Indians have called forth against the Church. The manuscript was probably written to teach Quechua speaking children the use of Spanish. It is divided into three chapters: I. Declination and conjugations. II. Latin and Greek declination. III. Romance. Genres and past. The teaching is rudimentary for the treatment of the way to teach to children, and very easy for the instructor and profitable for the disciples. Treatment 1: In the way it must be for children to learn to decline. Treatment 2: The style that the teacher has to keep for children to learn to conjugate. Treatment 3: Declensions and names and supplement to them. Includes Orthographic Rules and index of the most important things contained in this book. Condition: Old institution stamp to title and occasional other pages in margin, page 203 and 204 with tear at margin slightly affecting text, lacks ties else a very nice copy.

$7500.00

Missions and Pueblos of the Old Southwest: Their Myths, Legends, Fiestas, and Ceremonies, with some Accounts of the Indian Tribes and their Dances; and of the Penitentes
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Missions and Pueblos of the Old Southwest: Their Myths, Legends, Fiestas, and Ceremonies, with some Accounts of the Indian Tribes and their Dances; and of the Penitentes

By Forest, Earle Robert (1883-1969) inscribed by Arthur H Clark

386 pages with frontispiece, plates, folding map, appendix, bibliography and index. Royal octavo (9 1/2" x 6 1/2") bound in original publisher's blue cloth with gilt lettering to spine. Inscribed by the Publisher''s Arthur H Clark. First edition. Earle Forrest received a B.S. from Washington and Jefferson College in 1908, although he later said it was a mystery how he graduated since he was away so much. He then went on to study forestry at the University of Washington from 1908 to 1909. In April of 1914 Forrest got a temporary job at the Washington Record, a newspaper that was just starting up at the time. The temporary position turned into a lifelong career for Forrest who worked in the newspaper business the rest of his life. In addition to court work Forrest was a feature writer specializing in historical subjects. In 1925 the editor of the Reporter suggested that Forrest write a daily column of news gathered from the old files. He was a nationally known author of books on the Old West publishing six fiction and non-fiction works related to the southwest. For many years Forrest was a member of the Washington County Historical Society and in 1947 he became president, holding the office until 1951 when he retired. This carefully researched work on the Southwest and its Native American tribes, with 32 photographic plates featuring views of the Southwest was accomplished this work through 25 years of careful research in the Southwest. He traveled extensively, methodically visiting different Native American tribes, seeking out historic ruins, and sorting out fact from myth. The result of his efforts is this book, in which Forrest traces the myths, legends, fiestas, and ceremonies of the Southwest. Published the same year as a signed limited edition of only 100 copies. Condition: Inscribed on front end paper. Stain to cover, corners bumped, corners and spine ends rubbed else about very good.

$75.00

Sanctum provinciale concilium mexici celebratum Anno Domini millessimo quingentessimo octuagessimo quinto, Presidente in eo Illmo. ac Rmo. D.D. Petro Moya de Contreras Archiepo. Mexicano nunc vero ad instantiam et ex sumptibus Ill. ac Rmi. D.D. Ioannis de la Serna Archiep. Mexican. iussu regio editum
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Sanctum provinciale concilium mexici celebratum Anno Domini millessimo quingentessimo octuagessimo quinto, Presidente in eo Illmo. ac Rmo. D.D. Petro Moya de Contreras Archiepo. Mexicano nunc vero ad instantiam et ex sumptibus Ill. ac Rmi. D.D. Ioannis de la Serna Archiep. Mexican. iussu regio editum

By Moya de Contreras, Pedro (c1528-1591)

[5]+102+[1]+38+[1] leaves with title page engraved by Samuel Stradanus of Antwerp, but executed in Mexico. Folio (11 1/2" x 8") bound in contemporary vellum. Each source collates the preliminaries of this work differently, but this copy has the usual 3-page Juan de la Serna dedication which was not noted by Medina, Palau, or Sabin. (Medina, Mexico 343; Palau 293978; Sabin 48373; Szewczyk, 39 Books and Broadsides 29) First edition. The plate was engraved by Samuel Stradanus of Antwerp, who was used to print certificates of indulgences of forty days' remission of sins from Juan Pérez de la Serna, then Archbishop of Mexico. The certificates were given to people who donated money to finance the construction of the new sanctuary of Tepeyac, consecrated in 1622, which later became the Basilica of Guadalupe. Its actual title is Virgen de Guadalupe con escenas de ocho milagros (Spanish: Virgin of Guadalupe with scenes of eight miracles), but the term Stradanus engraving is used by Guadalupan researchers. It is the first document to depict the apparition of the Virgin of Guadalupe, and may have been a source of the Nican motecpana, the portion of the Huei tlamahuiçoltica, an early source of the Guadalupan apparition, that relates the miracles associated with the icon. The first publication of the comprehensive social code of New Spain decreed by the Third Mexican Concilium in 1585. Largely concerned with missionary activities and the rights of the Indians. Condition: Minor wear, wear to engraved title page, intermittent damp-staining, lacking rear free end-paper; early inscription on title page else a good copy.

$5000.00

Representacion al Rey N. Señor D. Phelipe V . dirigida al mas seguro aumento del Real Erario, y conseguir la felicidad, mayor alivio, riqueza y abundancia de su Monarquia ... Quesolos nuestros esanoles hagan el comercio de la America, trayendose a Espana y circulando en solo ella, los inmensos thesoros que producen aquellos riquissimos reynos
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Representacion al Rey N. Señor D. Phelipe V . dirigida al mas seguro aumento del Real Erario, y conseguir la felicidad, mayor alivio, riqueza y abundancia de su Monarquia ... Quesolos nuestros esanoles hagan el comercio de la America, trayendose a Espana y circulando en solo ella, los inmensos thesoros que producen aquellos riquissimos reynos

By Zavala y Auñón, Miguel de

[4], 266 [ie 256] pages. Folio (11 1/2" x 8 1/4") bound in later quarter calf with gilt lettering. (Palau 37815; European Americana 732/256; Sabin 106282) First edition. This is the true first edition of an important work on the Spanish economy with emphasis on colonial commerce. The text was reprinted in 1738 with the same date as the first; however, it has a different collation (180 leaves) and the preliminaries are dated 5 June 1738 (European Americana, 738/254). The present, true first edition is a scare item. Miguel de Zavala y Aunon, eighteenth century Spanish official and economist, held several public positions: treasurer of the army and the register for real estate (1716-1730), perpetual ruler of Badajoz and superintendent of the paymaster annuities. He also was a member of the Council of Castile. In the present work the author presents his ideas to Philip V on methods to increase the treasury through the trade of agricultural goods in Spain and the West Indies. He expresses his economic theories in which he proposed the abolition of provincial revenue which would be replaced by a direct tax on land and the taxing of individuals (a type of income tax). Proposing freeing up the establishment of trading companies in agricultural goods and the implementation of neo-mercantilist trade ideas with their American colonies which would control capital movement and centralize currency decisions in the hands of the central government in order to increase the level of foreign reserves. In particular he wanted to increase the volume of commerce within Spain and with the American colonies by restricting it to Spanish trading companies. Included are descriptions of the trade in tobacco, cacao, gold, silver, etc. Condition: Minor wear, corners repaired, minor foxing, minor soiling, lone wormhole in margin else a very good copy.

$2000.00

The Aztecs Under Spanish Rule: A History of the Indians of the Valley of Mexico 1519-1810
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The Aztecs Under Spanish Rule: A History of the Indians of the Valley of Mexico 1519-1810

By Gibson, Charles (1920-1985)

x+657 pages with frontispiece, 12 maps, 17 figures, 15 plates, appendixes, bibliography and index. Royal octavo (9 1/2" x 6 1/2") bound in original publisher's black cloth with gilt lettering to spine in original pictorial jacket. First edition. This is the history of the Indians of the valley of Mexico, one of the two most important indigenous groups in the Spanish empire in America, from the conquest to Independence in the early nineteenth century. Based upon ten years of research, this study casts new light on many of the great themes of Spanish Colonial history: the early promise of a cultural accord between the Spaniards and Indians; the growing divisions within the two societies, as well as between them; and the steady increase in the exploitation of the Indians, largely unchecked by the Spanish crown. The focus throughout is on the effect of Spanish institutions on Indian life at the local level: the early fragmentation of the Aztec empire into many semi-independent towns, the complex relations between head towns (caberceras) and subject towns, and the changes in local economies, especially as seen in agriculture, trade, finance, labor and the division of land. Social and religious changes in the Indian communities are also closely analyzed, so that the progressive dissolution of a great native empire into clusters of demoralized and exploited people emerges with clarity and fullness. The final chapter deals with the special case of the Indians of Mexico City. The text is supplemented by six Appendixes which present hitherto unexploited data on encomiendas, cabecera-sujeto relations, political jurisdictions and population figures. Condition: Light edge wear. Jacket with light edge wear else better than very good in like jacket.

$75.00

Americana thebaida. Vitas patrum de los religiosos hermitanos de N.P. San Augustin de la provincia de San Nicolas Tolentino de Mechoacan, escrita por Fr. Matias de Escobar, ano 1729
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Americana thebaida. Vitas patrum de los religiosos hermitanos de N.P. San Augustin de la provincia de San Nicolas Tolentino de Mechoacan, escrita por Fr. Matias de Escobar, ano 1729

By Escobar, Matias de (1690-1748)

xlvii+897 pages with plates and foldout picto-gram. Royal octavo (9 1/2" x 7 1/4") bound in half brown leather with raised spine bands and gilt lettering to spine with original wrappers bound in. Edited by Nicolas Leon. From the library of George M Foster. second edition. Matias de Escobar continued the narrative started by Diego Basalenque by drawing on him, on Grijalva and on a lost manuscript by Jacinto de Aviles. His own work has never been completely published. He brought events down to his own time, 1729. He entitled it Americana Thebaida, with a subtitle indicating it was to contain lives of the Augustinians of Michoacan. It contents fall into 61 chapters. The early ones repeat the pioneer history of the Augustinians in Mexico and Michoacan. The author devotes much attention to mission methods for Indian conversions, the founding of monasteries and biographies of numerous Augustinian missionaries, especially from his own province. His account has a wider scope in place and time than similar Augustinian efforts. But as a stylist, Escobar is close runner-up to Burgoa for lowest honors. His baroque sentences are overloaded with pretentious and irrelevant erudition, sacred and profane. Hence Americana Thebaida is seldom read for pleasure. Escobar's work still awaits proper publication. Nicolas Leon twice edited the chronicle, neither time completely successfully. Santiago Vela re-issued chapter 17 of book I from the original manuscript, dealing with the historians of the Chapter. He also has provided critcal notices of the extant editions, in one instance providing a complete table of contents. (Handbook of Middle American Inidans: vol 13, pg 161.) George McClelland Foster, Jr born in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, on October 9, 1913, died on May 18, 2006, at his home in the hills above the campus of the University of California, Berkeley, where he served as a professor from 1953 to his retirement in 1979, when he became professor emeritus. His contributions to anthropological theory and practice still challenge us; in more than 300 publications, his writings encompass a wide diversity of topics, including acculturation, long-term fieldwork, peasant economies, pottery making, public health, social structure, symbolic systems, technological change, theories of illness and wellness, humoral medicine in Latin America, and worldview. The quantity, quality, and long-term value of his scholarly work led to his election to the National Academy of Sciences in 1976. Virtually all of his major publications have been reprinted and/or translated. Provenance from the executor of Foster's library laid in. Condition: Spine ends and points rubbed, Foster's date of acquiry (9/11/44) on half title, lack's Foster's stamp

$250.00

The Conquest of Michoacan: The Spanish domination of the Trascan Kingdom in Western Mexico, 1521-1530
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The Conquest of Michoacan: The Spanish domination of the Trascan Kingdom in Western Mexico, 1521-1530

By Warren, J Benedict

xv+352 pages with map, tables, figures, illustrations, appendices, bibliography and index. Royal octavo (9 14" x 6 1/4") bound in original publisher's brown cloth with white and gilt lettering to spine in original pictorial jacket. The Civilization of American Indian Series number 98. From the library of Professor George M FosterFirst edition. This book deals principally with the period between the first appearance of the Spaniards in Michoacan in 1521 and the execution of the young Cazonci in 1530. Opening with a brief description of Tarascan culture at the time of European contact, it describes the first exploratory contacts between the two peoples, the Spanish occupation of the Tarascan region and the assignment of the towns to the Spaniards at tribute-paying encomiendas. In succeeding chapters the author traces the initial efforts of the Spaniards to eliminate the native religion and put Roman Catholicism in its place. He describes the political turmoil and Spanish economic exploitation and the effects upon the Cazonci and his people. the final pages show how the forces of the Conquest ultimately destroyed the Cazonci. In previous works the Cazonci has been portrayed as a cowardly monarch finally sacrificed to Spanish greed. In this work are revealed the much more complicated motivations an influences that led to the king's trial in a Spanish court and execution by garrote and fire. In preparing this work the author consulted extensive archival materials to reinterpret and supplement the primary works about the period and makes detailed use of the record of the trial of the last Cazonci. George McClelland Foster, Jr born in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, on October 9, 1913, died on May 18, 2006, at his home in the hills above the campus of the University of California, Berkeley, where he served as a professor from 1953 to his retirement in 1979, when he became professor emeritus. His contributions to anthropological theory and practice still challenge us; in more than 300 publications, his writings encompass a wide diversity of topics, including acculturation, long-term fieldwork, peasant economies, pottery making, public health, social structure, symbolic systems, technological change, theories of illness and wellness, humoral medicine in Latin America, and worldview. The quantity, quality, and long-term value of his scholarly work led to his election to the National Academy of Sciences in 1976. Virtually all of his major publications have been reprinted and/or translated. Provenance from the executor of Foster's library laid in. Condition: Foster's stamp to front end paper. Jacket spine ends rubbed else a near fine copy in like jacket.

$100.00

Sixteenth-Century Mexico: The Work of Sahagun
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Sixteenth-Century Mexico: The Work of Sahagun

By Munro Sterling Edmonson (1924-2002) [editor]

xvi+292 pages with map, tables, charts, plates and index. Royal octavo (9 1/4" x 6 1/4") bound in original publisher's green cloth with black lettering to spine in original jacket. Foreword by Douglas Schwartz First edition. Contents: "Sahagun and His Times" by Arthur J O Anderson; "The Ethnographic Works of Adres de Olmos, Precursor and Contemporary of Sahagun" by Jefferey K Wilkerson; "The Rhetorical Orations, or Huehuetlatolli Collected by Sahagun" by Thelma D Sullivan; "The Research Method of Fray Bernardino de Sahagun: The Questions" by Alfredo Lopez Austin; "The Treatment of Architecture in the Florentine Codex of Sahagun" by Donald Robertson; "The Last Years of Fray Bernardino Sahagun (1685-90): The Rescue of the Confiscated Work and the Seraphic Conflicts. New Unpublished Documents" by Georges Baudot; "The Sahagun Texts as a Source of Sociological Information" by Edward E Calenk; "Sahagun's Work and the Medicine of the Ancient Nahuas: Possibilities for Study" by Alfredo Lopez Austin; "The Nahualtization of Christianity" by Charles E Dibble; "The Problematic of Sahagun: Certain Topics Needing Investigation" by Miguel Leon-Portilla. Condition: Corners bumped. Jacket with light edge wear, spine lightly sunned, spine ends and hinges rubbed else a better than very good copy in like jacket.

$20.00

El Triunfo de la Cruz. A description of the building by Father Juan Ugarte of the first ship made in California
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El Triunfo de la Cruz. A description of the building by Father Juan Ugarte of the first ship made in California

By Theodore Henry Hittell (1830-1917)

27 pages with title page decorated with an invented armorial shield in four colors and gilt, initial text letter in red and six small line illustrations by Valenti Angelo. Octavo (8 3/4" x 5 3/4") bound in original publisher's grey cloth with gilt lettering to spine. Prefatory note by Oscar Lewis. Signed by illustrator. Limited to 400 copies. The text written by San Francisco historian Theodore Hittel pay eloquent tribute to the Jesuit priest Juan Ugarte, and his work among the natives of Baja California in the early 18th century. It originally appeared in the January, 1880 issue of the pioneer western magazine, The Californian. Condition: Signed on the back page by the illustrator. Lightly soiled else a near fine copy.

$20.00

The Colonial Andes: Tapestries and Silverwork, 1530-1830
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The Colonial Andes: Tapestries and Silverwork, 1530-1830

By Elena Phipps, Johanna Hecht and Cristina Esteras Martin

xvii+396 pages with color frontispiece, plates, figures, illustrations (man in color), maps, bibliography and index. Folio (12 1/4" x 9 1/4") bound in original publisher's red cloth with silver lettering to spine in original pictorial jacket. First edition. When the Spanish landed on the coast of what is today Peru in 1532, they encountered the socially complex, artistically vibrant Inca Empire, whose vast, geographically diverse domain encompassed almost the entire length of the rugged Andes. Inca master weavers and metalsmiths, building on thousands of years of local artisanal mastery, had created a spectacular body of imperial art whose bold, mostly geometric designs were powerful expressions of Inca identity and sovereignty. Within one generation that culture had been forever transformed by the establishment of the viceroyalty of Peru. The remarkable exchange of cultures that ensued brought Europe and the New World together through a vibrant trade in goods, services, and ideas, creating a unique society that was richer and far more intriguing than the mere sum of its influences. Tapestry weaving and silverwork, for centuries two of the primary art forms in the Andes, flourished during the colonial era, as many highly skilled indigenous artists were inspired by exotic new design sources form around the world. The refined weaving methods the Inca had cultivated were put to use crafting all manner of textile goods, from grand armorial hangings to meticulously woven garments, bedcovers and carpets. SIlverwork, too, was transformed, especially after the discovery of great lodes of the precious metal in the mountains above the town of Potosí, in modern Bolivia. Native metalworkers and European immigrant silversmiths alike struggled to keep pace with commissions, which included every variety of domestic object—from ewers, trays and basins to incense burners—as well as ecclesiastical pieces, such as the elaborate monstrances used to display the consecrated Host during Mass. This unique volume illustrates and discusses in detail more than 160 extraordinary fine and decorative art works of the colonial Andes, including examples of the intricate Inca weavings and metalwork that preceded the colonial era as well as a few of the remarkably inventive forms this art took after independence from Spain. An international array of scholars and experts examines the cultural context, aesthetic pre-occupations, and diverse themes of art from the viceregal period, particularly the florid patternings and the fanciful beasts and hybrid creatures that have come to characterize colonial Andean art. Condition: Heal page corners bumped else a very good copy in a near fine jacket.

$20.00

Espanoles en Xalapa: Migracion e insercion en la sociedad  Xalapena 1824-1835
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Espanoles en Xalapa: Migracion e insercion en la sociedad Xalapena 1824-1835

By Maria del Rosario Juan Mendoza

515 pages with photographs, maps, tables, bibliography and index. Octavo (9" x 6 1/4") bound in original publisher's pictorial wrappers. First edition limited to 500 copies. The author studies these Hispanic immigrants who arrived in Veracruz mainly between 1780 and 1820 in search of investment opportunities and social promotion. For this he analyzed the types of migration, economic activities, family ties, peasantry, and compadrazgos that allowed them to insert themselves into society xalapeña and consolidate as part of the local elite. However, as well the author shows, this group of Spaniards was not homogeneous because the destiny of each one of its members was marked by its economic capacity and by the social relationships that he managed to establish with the local power groups from the moment of their arrival. Is ability to integrate into society, and to establish links and networks social issues, was also decisive when the laws of expulsion of Spaniards of 1827 and 1829. So that the best positioned companies were able to be part of the exceptions provided- by the federal and state governments. Spaniards in Xalapa responds to a concern of its author for the lack of work that deepens the role of immigrants Hispanics in the integration and definition of the regions. Because of the little that its integration and consolidation has been as a power group in the societies of the end of the colonial period. So, this book is enriching the Mexican bibliography Condition: Light edge wear else a near fine copy.

$25.00

Relacion Sobre La Pacificacion Y Poblacion De Las Provincias Del Manche I Lacandon
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Relacion Sobre La Pacificacion Y Poblacion De Las Provincias Del Manche I Lacandon

By Pinelo, Antonio de León (1589-1660)

xxxiii+44 pages. Duodecimo (6 1/2" x 4 1/2") issued in wrappers. Introduction by Jaime Delgado. From the library of George M Foster. Number 153 of a limited edition of 225 copies. 2d edition. Pinelo was born in Cordova de Tucuman, and educated in the College of the Jesuits of Lima. He traveled to Spain in 1612 and became attorney of the council of the Indies. Later became judge of the tribunal of La Contratacion in Seville, succeeding Gil Gonzalez Davila in 1637 in the post of historian of the Indies. He died in Seville. The "cedularios" permitted initiating the compiling works, because they provided order to legal texts. Using those as a base, several Spanish jurists started writing the so called "summaries", which were extracts of a new law or a mixture of several laws about the same theme. In this work, one of the first was Diego de Zorrilla, whose work was then revised by Rodrigo de Aguiar and lastly by Antonio de Leon Pinelo, who prepared a new project and in 1628 published the summaries of the 4 first books so they could be revised. Around 1615 Leon Pinelo began collecting all the decrees and ordinances that had been issued either by the home government or by the viceroys of the American possessions. He began publishing his works in 1623 Discurso de la importancia, de la forma, y de la disposicion de la colleccion de las leyes de Indias (Seville, 1623); After obtaining the king's approval to search the archives of Madrid and Simancas, he published an abridged first part, Sumario de la recopilacion general (Seville, 1634). He completed the work in 1645, but its publication was deferred until 1680, when Vicente Gonzaga published it under the title Recopilacion general de las leyes de las Indias (4 vols., Madrid, 1680). He published Tratado de confirmaciones reales, que se requieren para las Indias Occidentales (1630); Tablas Cronologicas (1645); Aparato politico de las Indias Occidentales (1653) Vida de Santo Toribio arzobispo de Lima (1653); El Paraiso en el Nuevo Mundo (1656) and Acuerdos del Concejo de Indias (1658). Pinelo left also several manuscripts, some of which have been published since his death: Politica de las Indias; Bulario Indico; Code of the canonical laws in force in South America; Historia del Supremo Concejo de las Indias; Las ha-zafias de Chile con su historia; Fundacion v historia de la ciudad de Lima; Descubrimiento y historia de Potosi and Relacion de la provincia de Minche y Lacaudon. George McClelland Foster, Jr born in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, on October 9, 1913, died on May 18, 2006, at his home in the hills above the campus of the University of California, Berkeley, where he served as a professor from 1953 to his retirement in 1979, when he became professor emeritus. His contributions to anthropological theory and practice still challenge us; in more than 300 publications, his writings encompass a wide diversity of topics, including acculturation, long-term fieldwork, peasant economies, pottery making, public health, social structure, symbolic systems, technological change, theories of illness and wellness, humoral medicine in Latin America, and worldview. The quantity, quality, and long-term value of his scholarly work led to his election to the National Academy of Sciences in 1976. Virtually all of his major publications have been reprinted and/or translated. Provenance from the executor of Foster's library laid in. Condition: A near fine copy, deckle edged and Foster's stamp to front wrapper.

$125.00

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