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MORATORIUM: OCTOBER 15, 1969
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MORATORIUM: OCTOBER 15, 1969

By Sivack, Denis

New York: [The author], 1970. First Edition. Broadside. Near fine. Broadside, 14 x 11 inches. Near fine. Poetry broadside by writer and photographer Denis Sivack, recounting scenes of the day of the Moratorium to End the War in Vietnam mass demonstrations in New York. He drives in the morning from Staten Island, where he sees a Black army recuit staring into the distance, to Brooklyn, where he listens to variety of voices, including a representative of Women Strike for Peace, members of the Black Panthers, and the poet David Henderson, and finally to Washington Square in Greenwich Village, where he sees the statistics of the war dead on the Judson Memorial Church bulletin board and is left with the image of the darkness after a vigil's last candle "had burned to nothing and the last man had walked away." OCLC records two copies, at Brown and SUNY Buffalo (2017).

$100.00

THUMBPRINT
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THUMBPRINT

By Weatherley, Tom [i.e. Thomas E. Weatherly]

[New York]: Telegraph Books, 1971. First Edition. Softcover. Near fine. 36 pp. Pictorial wrappers. Light shelf wear. Near fine. The second book of poems by poet, educator, and longtime denizen of Greenwich Village and the Lower East Side, Tom Weatherly (1942-2014). In his review for Weatherly’s last published book, SHORT HISTORY OF THE SAXOPHONE, Andrei Codrescu said his work “condenses the wisdom of a life and vast readings into brilliantly compact music.” Clay and Phillips, pp. 212-213.

$40.00

THE VILLAGE BEAT SCENE: SUMMER 1960 [Offprint from Summer 1961 Issue of DISSENT]
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THE VILLAGE BEAT SCENE: SUMMER 1960 [Offprint from Summer 1961 Issue of DISSENT]

By Polsky, Ned

[New York: Dissent Publishing], 1961. First Separate Edition. Softcover. Near fine. [1961]. 23 pp. Printed self-wrappers, saddle-stapled. Tiny stain (one-eighth inch) at fore-edge of front wrapper, light toning in wrappers, else fine. The first published sociological account of beat counterculture, here in a scarce offprint from the Summer 1961 "New York, N.Y." issue of DISSENT magazine. The article would later be published in Polsky's 1967 HUSTLERS, BEATS, AND OTHERS. Ned Polsky (1928-2000) taught sociology for a number of years at SUNY Stony Brook before joining the antiquarian book trade in his retirement. He first came to national attention in 1957 with his critique of Norman Mailer's essay, "The White Negro: Superficial Reflections on the Hipster" - his response, and Mailer's counter-response, were published in both City Lights' book version of Mailer's essay and the Winter 1958 issue of DISSENT. (Polsky was less Sanguine than Mailer about the validity of both the white male hipster's sexual revolutionariness and racial radicalism. On the fomer topic: "When Mailer glamorizes the hipsters' 'search after the good orgasm' he is simply accepting at face value their rationalization for what is in truth a pathetic, driven sex life in which the same failures are repeated again and again. On this matter as on others, Mailer confuses the life of action with the life of acting out.") In the present study, Polsky differentiates the "hipster" from the "beat" (see below) and covers a broad range of topics, including anti-bourgeois attitudes, work (and oppostition to work), sex and sexuality, race, drugs (especially marijuana and heroin), and jazz. On beats vs. hipsters: "Until recently 'hipster' simply meant one who is hip, roughly the equivalent of a beat. Beats recognized that the hipster is more of an 'operator' - has a more consciously patterned lifestyle (such as a concern to dress well) and makes more frequent economic raids on the frontiers of the square world - but stressed their social bonds with hipsters, such as their liking for drugs, for jazz music, and, above all, their common scorn for bourgeois career orientations. Among Village beats today, however, 'hipster' usually has a pejorative connotation: one who is a mannered showoff regarding his hipness, who 'comes on' too strongly in hiptalk, etc. In their own eyes, beats are hip but definitely not hipsters" (pp. 3-4).

$100.00

THE PARANOID'S PRIMER : CONTAINING SOME NOTES ON RAY MACHINE REALITY AND DEUS EX MACHINA OR THE 'S' BOMB TOGETHER WITH A MODUS OPERANDI, FOR SCHIZOTHYMIC AGT.'S
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THE PARANOID'S PRIMER : CONTAINING SOME NOTES ON RAY MACHINE REALITY AND DEUS EX MACHINA OR THE 'S' BOMB TOGETHER WITH A MODUS OPERANDI, FOR SCHIZOTHYMIC AGT.'S

By Tyler, Richard Oviet; [Claes Oldenburg & Jim Dine]

New York: Uranian Press, 1961. First Edition. Softcover. Near fine. Tyler, Richard. [28] pp. including in-text woodcut and deep etch relief illustrations. Green wrappers, printed in red, side-stapled. Numbered and signed in pencil by Richard Tyler on the publisher's page over his ink-stamped monogram. Seal of Uranian Press embossed in title leaf. Staples rusted, causing small stains at gutter and neat detachment of center sheet (including two-page plate, "The Schizophenic Bomb"), else fine. Numbered 9 of 300 copies. An early and important work of visionary artist Richard O. Tyler's Uranian Press, "Offered not only as an Object of Curiosity & Entertainment, but as a Work of Real & Substantial USE." Richard Oviet Tyler (1926-1983) established the Uranian Press in 1958 in the basement of a tenement on the Lower East Side where, by 1960, he had installed four printing presses. Under the Uranian imprint, Tyler, his wife, Dorothea Baer, and friends produced chapbooks, broadsides, and artist's books that Tyler would sell from a pushcart in the yard of Judson Memorial Church at Washington Square Park (a nod to both contemporary Jewish peddlers of the Lower East Side and the chapmen of Elizabethan England). Tyler, Baer, and their circle soon began developing an unusual, quasi-religious artists' collective that would eventually become known as the Uranian Phalanstery. THE PARANOID'S PRIMER brings together three works reflecting Tyler's interest in nuclear-apocalyptic fears, Jungian psychology, Western astrology, and psychosis. The first is referred to in the text as a revised version of "Some Notes on Ray Machine Reality," which had been written by Tyler originally for the Ray Gun Documents series and printed for the Ray Gun Exhibition of 1960 at Judson Church Gallery by Claes Oldenburg and Jim Dine. The second, "Deus ex Machina or the 'S' Bomb," was printed separately by Tyler the same year as the PRIMER. It contains a double-page deep-etch relief print in red, "The Schizophrenic Bomb : An Artifice for Armageddon," a nightmarish city scene that would become one of Tyler's best-known images. The text, printed the same year as Michael Hollingshead famous first meetings with Timothy Leary, includes one of the earliest counterculture references to LSD. The final piece, "Modus Operandi for Schizothymic Agt's," comprises a series of quotations from psychiatry textbooks, Jung's writings, and other sources, as well as an advertisment for "The Complete Assassin's Kit for disassociated anarchists" ($5) on the final page.

$200.00

FELIX OF THE SILENT FOREST
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FELIX OF THE SILENT FOREST

By Henderson, David; LeRoi Jones [later Amiri Baraka] (intro.)

New York: The Poets Press, 1967. First Edition. Hardcover. Near fine. [48] pp. Original brown cloth, front cover lettered in gilt, patterned endpapers. Signed by David Henderson on the title page. Light toning at edges of outer leaves, else fine. One of 25 copies hand-bound and signed by the author (of a total first edition of 2000 copies). The first book of David Henderson, New York School poet, founding member of the Umbra literary collective, and co-founder of the Black Arts Movement. The book was designed by Bret Rohmer and printed for Diane di Prima's Poets Press at the Kriya Press in Millbrook, New York, during Timothy Leary's residence there. Clay and Phillips, p. 89.

$250.00

IN ADVANCE OF THE BROKEN ARM
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IN ADVANCE OF THE BROKEN ARM

By Padgett, Ron; Ted Berrigan (ed.)

New York: Lorenz Gude [i.e. "C" Press], 1964. First Edition. Softcover. Very good. Brainard, Joe. 11 inches tall. [20] leaves, printed recto only, including 4 full-page illustrations. Pictorial covers, side-stapled. Signed by Padgett on the colophon. Upper-left corner of front cover creased, with some further wear to extremities, covers lightly dust-soiled. Very good. Numbered 22 of a limited first edition of 200 signed copies. An early "C" Press publication, with poems by Padgett and cover and drawings by Joe Brainard.

$175.00

IN ADVANCE OF THE BROKEN ARM
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IN ADVANCE OF THE BROKEN ARM

By Padgett, Ron; Ted Berrigan (ed.)

New York: Lorenz Gude [i.e. "C" Press], 1964. Second Edition. Softcover. Very good. Brainard, Joe. 11 inches tall. [17] leaves, printed recto only, including 2 full-page illustrations. Pictorial covers, side-stapled. Title page signed and inscribed by Padgett. Small ink notes also in title page: "NY65" and ".75." Covers lightly toned and dust-soiled, else near fine. Numbered 71 of a limited second edition of 200 signed copies. With a new cover design and two new drawings (replacing the original four) by Joe Brainard. Padgett signs the title page, “Ron,” below his printed name; above it, he writes, “‘I like the sound of my own voice’ – Ted Berrigan.”

$150.00

ADVENTURES IN POETRY : NUMBER ONE
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ADVENTURES IN POETRY : NUMBER ONE

By Fagin, Larry (ed.); Joe Ceravalo, James Schuyler, Ted Berrigan, Dick Gallup, Anne Waldman, Ron Padgett, Tom Clark, [et al.]

New York: [Adventures in Poetry], 1968. First Edition. Softcover. Near fine. 11 inches tall. [69] leaves, printed recto only, including 2 full-page illustrations. Photographic covers, side-stapled. Minor wear at extremities and light dust-soiling in rear cover, else near fine. First issue of the influential mimeograph magazine, published "during a crucial stage in the evolution of the New York School" (Diggory, p. 5). Editor Larry Fagin drew much of the material from readings he heard at the Poetry Project of St. Mark's Church-in-the-Bowery: "If I heard something I especially liked at a reading, I would rush to the podium and claim the manuscript for ADVENTURES. I was rarely refused. Editing was a good way to make friends (and, hopefully, not many enemies)" (Fagin in Clay and Phillips, p. 195). Terence Diggory describes ADVENTURES as complementing THE WORLD, which had started publication a year earlier as "an official journal" of the Poetry Project: "Whereas THE WORLD reflected the community in its spontaneity - like a pickup basketball game, in Fagin's analogy... - ADVENTURES IN POETRY shaped a community in which the sensibility of the editor was reflected" (p. 5). The magazine would run from 1968 to 1975 in 12 issues, and several dozen chapbooks were published under its imprint through 1976.

$75.00

THE BOOK OF THE BODY
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THE BOOK OF THE BODY

By Kupferberg, Tuli

New York: Birth Press, 1966. Softcover. Near fine. Wehlau, Judith, Tuli Kupferberg, [et al.]. 4¼ x 5½ inches. [64] pp., including illustrations on most pages, plus internal wrappers. Pictorial wrappers, saddle-stapled, paper in several colors. Near fine. Kupferberg's poetic collage work of drawings, found images, and statements relating to the human body.

$20.00

SELF PORTRAIT
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SELF PORTRAIT

By Brainard, Joe & Anne Waldman

New York: Siamese Banana Press, 1972. First Edition. Softcover. Near fine. 11 inches tall. [40] leaves (including inside rear cover), printed recto only. Stiff printed covers (with additional front cover), side-stapled. Signed by Waldman and Brainard on rear cover recto. A bit of wear and small dents near staples, else near fine. Lettered "F" of 26 copies lettered and signed by the authors. An introspective collaboration between New York School poet friends Joe Brainard and Anne Waldman. Following a pair of line-drawing visual self-portraits (and a dedication from each author to the other), the authors respond to a shared prompt on each page: "Queer," "One Dumb Thing," "Writing," "Selfish," "Love," "When I Was a Kid". . . . Clay and Phillips, p. 220.

$400.00

I REMEMBER
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I REMEMBER

By Brainard, Joe

New York: Angel Hair Books, 1970. First Edition. Softcover. Near fine. 10 inches tall. [36] pp. Pictorial wrappers, saddle-stapled. Covers lightly rubbed, else fine. One of 700 unnumbered copies (of a total of 726) printed for Angel Hair Books by Chapel Press in Williamstown, Massachusetts. First edition of Brainard's celebrated prose-poem memoir. In 2001, Paul Auster called it "a masterpiece": "One by one, the so-called important books of our time will be forgotten, but Joe Brainard's modest little gem will endure. In simple, forthright, declarative sentences, he charts the map of the human soul and permanently alters the way we look at the world. I REMEMBER is both uproariously funny and deeply moving. It is also one of the few totally original books I have ever read.” Clay and Phillips, p. 179.

$550.00

FRUITS OF THE WORLD IN DANGER
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FRUITS OF THE WORLD IN DANGER

By Baxter, Glen

New York: Gotham Book Mart, 1974. First Edition. Softcover. Near fine. Baxter, Glen. 11 inches tall. [7] leaves, leaves [2]-[7] printed recto only. Printed wrappers, side-stapled. Signed by Baxter on the title page. Near fine. Six illustrations of fruits in extremis (an orange resting on a railroad track as train speeds towards it, a banana below a circular saw...), drawn by Glen "Colonel" Baxter, British artist and poet associated with the New York School. As an art student in Leeds during the early 1960s, Baxter encountered the writing of Frank O'Hara and developed an interest in New York School poetry and the mimeograph magazines then being introduced to London. After submitting some of his own pieces to ADVENTURES IN POETRY, in 1974 Baxter was invited to the U.S. to read at St. Mark's Church in-the-Bowery - "I stood at the lectern, dressed in a tweed suit, and began to speak. People burst into spontaneous laughter. I had arrived" (from a 2016 interview in LITERARY HUB). That same year, Gotham Book Mart began hosting shows of his work (at which Edward Gorey was an enthusiastic customer) and published two 11 x 8½-inch format books: FRUITS OF THE WORLD IN DANGER and THE HANDY GUIDE TO AMAZING PEOPLE.

$150.00

THE HANDY GUIDE TO AMAZING PEOPLE
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THE HANDY GUIDE TO AMAZING PEOPLE

By Baxter, Glen

New York: Gotham Book Mart, 1974. First Edition. Softcover. Near fine. Baxter, Glen. 11 inches tall. [12] leaves, leaves [2]-[12] printed recto only. Patterned wrappers, side-stapled. Signed by Baxter on the title page. Small dents near staples, very light toning at edges of wrappers, else near fine. 12 portraits of "amazing people" drawn and captioned by Glen "Colonel" Baxter, British artist and poet associated with the New York School. The personalities include a Mrs. Thraxelpod of Trieste, pictured pole-vaulting over a puddle, who "to avoid speaking to her next door neighbour... once travelled over 8,000 miles"; Adolph Milkleg, "The Human Butterfly," seated in a suit and wings upon a branch (he "is an osteopath"); and Mrs. Annie Lugpon, of Venice, who resembles an 18th-century French chevalier and "lives in a two bedroom flat which is shaped like a worm." As an art student in Leeds during the early 1960s, Baxter encountered the writing of Frank O'Hara and developed an interest in New York School poetry and the mimeograph magazines then being introduced to London. After submitting some of his own pieces to ADVENTURES IN POETRY, in 1974 Baxter was invited to the U.S. to read at St. Mark's Church in-the-Bowery - "I stood at the lectern, dressed in a tweed suit, and began to speak. People burst into spontaneous laughter. I had arrived" (from a 2016 interview in LITERARY HUB). That same year, Gotham Book Mart began hosting shows of his work (at which Edward Gorey was an enthusiastic customer) and published two 11 x 8½-inch format books: THE HANDY GUIDE... and FRUITS OF THE WORLD IN DANGER.

$150.00

3 AMERICAN TANTRUMS
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3 AMERICAN TANTRUMS

By Brownstein, Michael

[New York]: Angel Hair Books, 1970. First Edition. Softcover. Near fine. 11 inches tall. [12] pp. Photographic wrappers, saddle-stapled. Inscribed, "For Jon," and signed by Brownstein on the publisher's page. Light wear, near fine. One of 737 unnumbered copies (of 750 total), printed for Angel Hair Books by Chapel Press in Williamstown, Massachusetts. Michael Brownstein's first collection of prose poems, three "tantrums" - expressions of rage alluding to (and contrasting with) the Hindo-Buddhist practices of Tantra. The first, "Monkey Blues," addresses the anguish of a circus monkey named Julian, who must work extra hours in humiliating jobs away from the big top to support his self-absorbed cynical junkie owner. In the ENCYCLOPEDIA OF THE NEW YORK SCHOOL POETS, Terence Diggory describes Michael Brownstein (born 1943) as 'convey[ing] Beat vision with New York School speed." After moving to New York in 1965, Brownstein quickly became involved with the Lower East Side poetry scene, becoming a founding participant of the Poetry Project at St. Mark's Church in-the-Bowery in 1966. Clay and Phillips, p. 179.

$75.00

FOUR DIALOGUES : FOR TWO VOICES AND TWO PIANOS
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FOUR DIALOGUES : FOR TWO VOICES AND TWO PIANOS

By Rorem, Ned (music) & Frank O'Hara (words)

New York: Boosey & Hawkes, 1969. First Edition. Softcover. Near fine. Joe Brainard. 12 inches. 63 pp. Color pictorial wrappers, saddle-stapled. Near fine. Sheet music for a 20-minute "Quartet of Dialogues" by Ned Rorem for man and woman (either soprano and tenor or mezzo-soprano and baritone) and two pianos, with words by Frank O'Hara. Rorem describes the genesis of the piece and its first performance in the introduction: "The late Frank O'Hara conceived the words to THE QUARREL SONATA (as he first called it) expressly to be set by me for the unique combination of two voices and two pianos. This was accomplished early in 1954, mostly in London and Paris. The premiere took place the following year at a private concert in the Contessa Pecci Blunt's Roman palazzo. The lavishly somnolent old-world décor seemed gorgeously anachronistic to our glib and non-poetry and vulgar music which, in their comic-strip tightness, pre-dated Pop Art by a decade." The "Quartet of Dialogues" follow the relationship of a man and a woman, first strangers who meet on "The Subway," court in a car parked at "The Airport," fight in "The Apartment," and finally separate, singing over the ocean to each other "In Spain and in New York." With a comics-inspired cover by Joe Brainard.

$150.00

CRISTINAS WORLD IM(MEDIA)CY POEMWORKS
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CRISTINAS WORLD IM(MEDIA)CY POEMWORKS

By Malanga, Gerard

[New York?]: Poetry on Films, Inc., 1970. First Edition. Softcover. Very good. 11 inches tall. [2],61,[1] pp. Photographic covers, side-stapled. Pink and blue tissue endpapers. Light wear to covers and minor soiling to rear cover. Very good to near fine. One of 474 copies in the trade edition (of 500 copies total). A series of "poemworks" composed chiefly on May 10, 1970 at Chadds Ford, Pennsylvania, in the presence of Cristina, his love interest and muse. The final eight poems were written on May 11 and 12, in part en route to and upon arrival in New York City. When Malanga published the work two months later, he dedicated it "to cristina who continues to make everything possible." But, Cristina remains something of a mystery - she appears to be Cristina Miller of Chadds Ford, Pennsylvania, home of Andrew Wyeth, but beyond this and her dazzling effect on Malanga little is known. The title is, of course, a nod to Wyeth's most famous painting. One poem in the collection, "the world #19," is a brief ecstatic utterance of Malanga's reading the latest issue of Anne Waldman's (and others') important mimeo poetry magazine in bed with Cristina in his arms, naming each of the poets featured, "all of which i love very much including you." The front cover features a photographic portrait of Cristina by Gerard Malanga, the rear cover three snapshots of Cristina and Gerard by John Wieners.

$125.00

WEST INDIES POEMS
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WEST INDIES POEMS

By Waldman, Anne & Joe Brainard (ill.)

New York: Adventures in Poetry, 1972. First Edition. Softcover. Near fine. 11 inches tall. [16] leaves, printed recto only, including 3 full-page illustrations. Pictorial covers, side-stapled. Signed by Waldman and Brainard on the colophon. Small dents near staples, else fine. Lettered "X" of 26 copies signed by Anne Waldman and Joe Brainard (of a larger first edition of 300), published by Adventures in Poetry at The Poetry Project at St. Mark's Church in-the-Bowery. Twelve poems composed at St. Martin's and Dominica in August, 1971, by Anne Waldman, in whose career "the diverse energies that make up the New York School can all be traced" (Diggory, p. 491). Despite being one of the younger members of the "second generation" of the New York School, Waldman played a central role in its formation during the mid-1960s and continuation in the 1970s, particularly through her leadership of the Poetry Project at St. Mark's Church and the journals ANGEL HAIR and THE WORLD. Covers and drawings by Waldman's longtime friend and collaborator, Joe Brainard. Clay and Phillips, p. 197.

$400.00

PAX [No. 2]
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PAX [No. 2]

By Gilman, Richard, E. E. Cummings & Claire McAllister; Robert Lax [ed.]

New York: [Robert Lax], 1956. Softcover. Near fine. Ad Reinhardt. Broadside, cut once and folded twice to 9 x 6 inches. Printed red on newsprint. Tiny chips and small closed tears at edges, neat separations along folds, else fine, with original blank envelope. The second issue of PAX, a poetry broadside printed at the press of JUBILEE magazine for Robert Lax. Lax (1915-2000) was a poet, editor, Catholic convert, and noted friend of Thomas Merton and painter Ad Reinhardt. After traveling for several years during the 1940s as a circus juggler, he became an early editor of JUBILEE, a lay Catholic magazine, in 1953, and produced 18 issues of PAX from 1956 to 1962, when he left the U.S. and permanently settled on the island of Patmos as a hermit. The present issue features cover art by Reinhardt and the poems, "Death of a the Hermit," by Richard Gilman, "Poem," by E. E. Cummings, and "The Brass-Clad Legions," by Claire McAllister. Scarce.

$250.00

FLAG FLUTTER & U.S. ELECTRIC
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FLAG FLUTTER & U.S. ELECTRIC

By Coolidge, Clark

New York: Lines, 1966. First Edition. Softcover. Very good. 11 inches tall. 3,22,[1] leaves, printed recto only. Pictorial covers, side-stapled. 1966 ownership signature of Michael Silveitz in title page. Some wear and uneven toning in covers, else very good. Clark Coolidge's first book of poetry, published by Aram Saroyan under the LINES imprint. Cover by Coolidge. Clay and Phillips, p. 210.

$200.00

MANY HAPPY RETURNS : TO DICK GALLUP
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MANY HAPPY RETURNS : TO DICK GALLUP

By Berrigan, Ted

New York: Printed by Grabhorn-Hoyem in San Francisco for Angel Hair Magazine, 1967. First Edition. Softcover. Near fine. Bifolium, 9½ x 7 inches. [4] pp. Title and colophon printed red. Signed by Ted Berrigan. Two contemporary ink corrections on second page. Very light dust-soiling on p. [4], else fine. One of 200 unlettered copies printed for Christmas (an additional four copies lettered and signed were printed hors commerce); signed by Berrigan. Berrigan dedicates the poem to Richard Gallup and refers within it to various other friends and poets throughout, including Joanne Kyger, Jack Kerouac, Anne Waldman, and Lewis Warsh. Fischer, p. 30.

$125.00

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