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PASSAGES FROM JAMES JOYCE'S FINNEGANS WAKE : A FILM BY EXPANDING CINEMA : DEDICATED TO FRANCES STELOFF [cover title]

By [Joyce, James; Mary Ellen Bute (script treatment)]

New York: Expanding Cinema [script published by arrangement with Viking Press], 1965. First Separate Edition. Softcover. Fine. 11 x 8½-inch leaves in an 11½ x 9-inch folder. [4],58,[3] pp. Leaves in printed blue metal tab folder. Fine. PASSAGES FROM JAMES JOYCE'S FINNEGANS WAKE was the final film produced and directed by Mary Ellen Bute (1906-1983), a pioneer in experimental film and animation. Bute spent much of her early career developing a style of "visual music" in film, synchronizing abstract images and music. PASSAGES, a film treatment of FINNEGANS WAKE using Joyce's original language, was largely a live-action piece but incorporated animation, double exposures, and various other unconventional visual methods. UbuWeb describes it as follows: "A half-forgotten, half-legendary pioneer in American abstract and animated filmmaking, Mary Ellen Bute, late in her career as an artist, created this adaptation of James Joyce, her only feature. In the transformation from Joyce's polyglot prose to the necessarily concrete imagery of actors and sets, Passages discovers a truly oneiric film style, a weirdly post-New Wave rediscovery of Surrealism, and in her panoply of allusion - 1950s dance crazes, atomic weaponry, ICBMs, and television all make appearances - she finds a cinematic approximation of the novel's nearly impenetrable vertically compressed structure. With Passages from Finnegans Wake Bute was the first to adapt a work of James Joyce to film and was honored for this project at the Cannes Film Festival in 1965 as best debut." The film was shown in limited capacities until its final release in 1967. Its screening of its first rush print, for which the present volume was produced, took place February 16, 1965, at the Metropolitan Museum of Art before an audience of the James Joyce Society in celebration of Joyce's birthday. The James Joyce Society was inaugurated in 1947 at the Gotham Book Bart. Bute dedicates her film to Gotham's founder and owner, Frances Steloff.

$40.00

[Portrait Photograph of Andy Warhol & Parker Tyler]
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[Portrait Photograph of Andy Warhol & Parker Tyler]

By Malanga, Gerard

[New York: Gerard Malanga], 1969. Photographs. Very good. [1969, printed later]. Image size 10 x 6¾ inches, sheet size 14 x 11 inches, mat size 16 x 12 inches. Numbered 2/10 and signed in pencil on the mat by Gerard Malanga. Very good. Exceptional portrait of Andy Warhol and Parker Tyler taken in New York in 1969. Tyler (1904-1974) was best known as a poet and film critic and, in his earlier life, co-author with Charles Henri Ford of the experimental novel, THE YOUNG AND EVIL (Paris: Obelisk Press, 1933). The photo shows Tyler and - extraordinarily - Warhol at ease and smiling, the latter jokingly clutching the former's crotch. Poet, photographer, and archivist Gerard Malanga (born 1943) was Warhol's right-hand man during the most important years of the Factory, where he worked from 1963 to 1970. Among his many collaborations with Warhol was the 1966/67 "Screen Tests" project. The project resulted in the 1967 book, SCREEN TESTS / A DIARY, which prints stills from film portraits of 54 poets, artists, musicians, and others, with poems by Malanga on facing pages. Malanga began pursuing portrait photography more actively in 1969, when the present photo was taken, and left the Factory in 1970 to pursue the work further. Over the next several years, Malanga photographed dozens of people, famous and not famous, associated with the New York avant garde and produced a body of portraits noted for their warmth and a clear rapport between photographer and subject. In an essay published in the 2000 retrospective book, GERARD MALANGA : SCREEN TESTS, PORTRAITS, AND NUDES, Ben Maddow writes, "One feels, in spite of one's hard earned skepticism ... on first viewing the labors of Gerard Malanga, a sensation of spontaneous pleasure. Each image is an act of friendship, and conciously so." He quotes Malanga from a letter, "Nothing is faked or was done for any other purpose than as archival remembrance. I believe each person, as it were, gave me their picture" (p. 120).

$1750.00

[Portrait Photograph of Taylor Mead]
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[Portrait Photograph of Taylor Mead]

By Malanga, Gerard

[New York: Gerard Malanga], 1971. Photographs. Very good. [1971, printed later]. Image size 10 x 6¾ inches, sheet size 14 x 11 inches, mat size 16 x 12 inches. Numbered 1/10 and signed in pencil on the mat by Gerard Malanga. Very good. Portrait of poet and actor Taylor Mead (1924-2013) swimming off Southampton Beach, Long Island, in 1971. Mead was a major figure in the Factory scene during the 1960s and a favorite fixture on the Lower East Side. His NEW YORK TIMES obiturary called his "the quintessential Downtown figure": "He read his poems in a Bowery bar, walked as many as 80 blocks a day and fed stray cats in a cemetery, usually after midnight." Poet, photographer, and archivist Gerard Malanga (born 1943) was Warhol's right-hand man during the most important years of the Factory, where he worked from 1963 to 1970. Among his many collaborations with Warhol was the 1966/67 "Screen Tests" project. The project resulted in the 1967 book, SCREEN TESTS / A DIARY, which prints stills from film portraits of 54 poets, artists, musicians, and others, with poems by Malanga on facing pages. Malanga began pursuing portrait photography more actively in 1969 and left the Factory in 1970 to pursue the work further. Over the next several years, Malanga photographed dozens of people, famous and not famous, associated with the New York avant garde and produced a body of portraits noted for their warmth and a clear rapport between photographer and subject. In an essay published in the 2000 retrospective book, GERARD MALANGA : SCREEN TESTS, PORTRAITS, AND NUDES, Ben Maddow writes, "One feels, in spite of one's hard earned skepticism ... on first viewing the labors of Gerard Malanga, a sensation of spontaneous pleasure. Each image is an act of friendship, and conciously so." He quotes Malanga from a letter, "Nothing is faked or was done for any other purpose than as archival remembrance. I believe each person, as it were, gave me their picture" (p. 120). The present photograph of Taylor Mead is the cover image for SCREEN TESTS, PORTRAITS, AND NUDES.

$1250.00

RUBAIYAT OF AN ACCOUNT OVERDUE
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RUBAIYAT OF AN ACCOUNT OVERDUE

By Morley, Christopher

New York: Printed by Lew Ney for Gotham Book Mart, 1935. First Edition. Softcover. Fine. Small quarto. Single sheet folded twice. [4] pp. Lettered "HC" in contemporary red ink in the colophon. Fine. The "deluxe" edition of a satirical poem composed by Christopher Morley and designed and printed by Lew Ney to help their friend and patron, Frances Steloff, founder and owner of Gotham Book Mart, during a moment of financial insecurity at the store in the mid-1930s. It "has been printed in this limited edition of 350 copies from Inkanabula type, imported from Italy. It was set by hand, and the type has been distributed."In the 1975 "Special Gotham Book Mart Issue" of JOURNAL OF MODERN LITERATURE (Vol. 4, No. 4), Frances Steloff describes the origin of the poem and its publication. One day in 1935, Steloff was dictating correspondence in the back of the shop, unaware that her friend and Gotham Book Mart regular Christopher Morley had stopped by. "He asked why I looked so glum, and I told him that I had been dictating dunning letters with the remark that if I could collect half of the outstanding accounts I could pay my rent and most of my bills. He asked if he could see a few of the letters, and I handed him the carbon copies. He then asked if he could borrow them. I was uneasy and thought that he might turn them over to an attorney, causing my customers embarrassment. He assured me that he just wanted to look them over and would return them on his next visit. In a few days he called up, 'Frances are you there?' Of course I was, and in a few minutes he was also, holding a page of manuscript. He asked excitedly, 'Are you familiar with the meter of the Rubaiyat?' I was, of course, as it had at one time been a favorite. He then read aloud the 'Rubaiyat of Account Overdue.' . . . Delighted with it, I decided to have it printed in two formats: a single page, to be sent with bills to all past due accounts, stating that a deluxe, autographed edition would be forthcoming on receipt of a check by return mail. That not only brought good results but also a problem - our prompt paying customers then felt it was more rewarding to be delinquent" (pp. 791-792). The present example of the poem was printed in its deluxe format but never signed and lettered, "HC" ("hors commerce"), rather than numbered, in the limitation statement. A fine survival from a touching and memorable chapter of the history of Gotham.

$50.00

EXHIBITION 1 : "ART IS ONE" : THE CASE FOR THE REINTEGRATION OF THE ARTS
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EXHIBITION 1 : "ART IS ONE" : THE CASE FOR THE REINTEGRATION OF THE ARTS

By Lipton, Lawrence; [Ron Boise; "Nico" van den Heuvel; Taki; Alex Vilumsons; Joe Zirker; Shela; Eva Meyer]

Santa Monica: Michael Intrator, 1961. First Edition. Softcover. Very good. Zirker, Joe. Approximately 7½ x 7 inches. 12 pp. Color printed wrappers, unbound. Light toning and light soiling in wrappers and title page. Very good. Limited edition of 250 copies. Cover designs printed from three linoleum blocks by Joe Zirker. Program for Lawrence Lipton's EXHIBITION 1 "art is one" performance/exhibition at Galerie Nico in Venice, California, February 24, 1961. The program contains a statement by Lipton on his "case for the reintegration of the arts," poems by Ron Boise, Alex Vilumsons, Joe Zirker, "Nico" van den Heuvel, and Taki, and additional statements by van den Heuvel, Taki, Vilumsons, Zirker, and dancers Shela and Eva Meyer. EXHIBITION 1 was a more multimedia follow-up to beat poet Lipton's recent "Jazz Canto: Vol. 1" LP recording, featuring sculptures, prints, paintings, and dance in addition to music and poetry.

$70.00

HE-MAN : AN INTERIM BOOK BROADSIDE : NUMBER ONE
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HE-MAN : AN INTERIM BOOK BROADSIDE : NUMBER ONE

By Zawadiwsky, Christine

New York: Interim Books, 1973. First Edition. Softcover. Near fine. Small quarto. [4] pp. Original printed wrappers, stitched. Light creasing in upper margin and some wear to yapped edges of wrappers, else near fine. Numbered 34 of 250 copies. The first publication of Ukrainian-American poet Christine Zawadiwsky (born 1950) and the first of five "broadsides" published by Kirby Congdon's Interim Press.

$100.00

REALISM AND REALITY
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REALISM AND REALITY

By Nin, Anaïs

New York: Printed by the Hunt Turner Press for the Alicat Book Shop, 1946. First Edition. Softcover. Very good. [1946]. Original purple pictorial wrappers, stapled. [4] pp. of early pencil notes on Japanese art in final three (blank) pages and recto of rear wrapper. Some wear to wrappers, with one inch of separation below bottom staple. Large chip to ower-outer corner of last leaf of text, not affecting text. Overall very good. Scarce suppressed first issue with the cover showing Nin in men's evening clothes, later replaced by a less controversial depiction of the woman author. The pamphlet is Number Six of the "Outcast" series of chapbooks published by the Alicat Book Shop, containing a biographical sketch of Anaiis Nin and her title essay, an apologia for and key to her writing.

$100.00

WHAT THE PENCIL WRITES / ORPHEE [Poetry Broadside]
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WHAT THE PENCIL WRITES / ORPHEE [Poetry Broadside]

By Laughlin, James; Vanessa Jackson (artist)

[New York: Grenfell Press], 1986. First Thus. Broadside. Fine. Jackson, Vanessa. Broadside, printed recto and verso, Approximately 10 x 16 inches. One poem facing one color woodcut print on each side, with "What the Pencil Writes" signed in pencil by Laughlin and facing print signed in pencil by Jackson. In English and French. Fine. Two-sided leaf printed by the Grenfell Press during its production of THE HOUSE OF LIGHT, a 1986 collaboration between poet and publisher James Laughlin (1914-1997) and British painter and printmaker Vanessa Jackson (b. 1953). Like the book, the leaf is printed on Rives paper, the text in hand-set Monotype Poliphilus, and the prints from the original blocks.

$200.00

[Two Studies for Portrait of Charles Henri Ford and Double Portrait of Tchelitchew and Ford]
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[Two Studies for Portrait of Charles Henri Ford and Double Portrait of Tchelitchew and Ford]

By [Tchelitchew, Pavel; Charles Henri Ford]

[New York?], 1935. Loose leaf. Near fine.. [Mid- to late-1930s]. Approximately 11½ x 7¾ inches and 12 x 7¾ inches. Ink and wash on paper. Contemporary pencil inscriptions on versos reading, "Sketch for CHF portrait" and "Sketch for CHF-PT Double Portrait," and both reading, "Collection of Charles Henri Ford." Both pieces near fine. Two sketches by Russian-born Surrealist painter Pavel Tchelitchew (1898-1957), both containing portraits of his partner of 24 years, Charles Henri Ford (1908-2002), poet, novelist, editor, and fellow Surrealist. The first sketch, in black in ak and wash, is a head portrait of Ford, the second, in brown wash, of Tchelitchew from behind holding a patinbrush and easel, in front of Ford, who is surrounded by four draped figures. Tchelitchew met Ford in Paris in 1933, the year the latter co-wrote with Parker Tyler the explicit, experimental THE YOUNG AND EVIL, which has been called the first American gay novel. The following year, Tchelitchew and Ford moved together to New York and remained companions until Tchelitchew's death. Neither portrait bears a date, but both are similar in style to comparable known sketches from the 1930s, and the single portrait of Ford clearly shows him as a young man.

$1250.00

[Two postcards with portraits of a young Truman Capote and inscriptions by his biological father, Archulus Persons]
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[Two postcards with portraits of a young Truman Capote and inscriptions by his biological father, Archulus Persons]

By [Capote, Truman]; Archulus Persons

1974. First Edition. Very good. [1974]. First card printed in blue, second in ruddy brown. First card inscribed on recto and verso, second on recto only. Two small stickers on versos with codes from Gotham Book Mart, "15-J" and "15-K," inscribed in red ink. Light wear to both cards, light soiling at edges, light crease in first card. Very good. Two postcards bearing captioned photographic images of a young Truman Capote, printed by his biological father, Archulus Persons, and inscribed by him to Capote in 1974. Archulus Arch Persons (1897-1981) was a salesman, promoter, bootlegger, and occasional confidence man based in Alabama and Louisiana most of his life. He married Lillie Mae Faulk in Monroeville, Alabama, in 1923. Truman originally named Truman Streckfus Persons was born the following year in New Orleans. At the time, Arch Persons was an enterprising young man with charm and promise. When Truman was born, he was working most months of the year as an advance man for the Streckfus Steamers riverboat excursion company. Capote biographer Gerald Clarke describes Arch as having been mesmerizing; he was tantalizing; he was, in his own way, a magician, Svegali in a white linen suit. His magnetic appeal became so celebrated the THE CIRCLE, the company magazine, officially declared him the Streckfus Lines Prince Charming (p. 8). In his free time, he pursued other ventures, however, and they soon began consuming his life. Failures in large promotional efforts eventually led him down less savory paths, and, during much of his marriage to Lillie Mae, he was supporting the family on bootlegging and bad checks. For her part, Lillie Mae dated other men during most of their seven-year marriage and was forever seeking escape from both her husband and her son. In the summer of 1930, Trumans parents put him in the care of his maternal aunts in Monroeville, and separately left for different states to follow new plans and schemes, each returning only occasionally. During this lonely time, when Trumans only real friend was the young Harper Lee, he would wait anxiously for visits from his father, but, once they came, they invariably included heartbreak from a range of broken promises. Finally, during one of Archs appearances in Monroeville, Truman was given two dollars for books by one of his aunts before a trip with his father to Mobile. Disappointment, writes Clarke, was delayed until they were in the restaurant, where Arch, whispering into Trumans ear, asked him for the two dollars Sook had given him. I never trusted him after that, Truman said (p. 25). Lillie Mae moved to New York City in 1931 and, after meeting the Cuban-born Joseph Capote, finally demanded a divorce from Arch. After a prolonged legal battle, Lillie Mae won full custody of Truman, and Arch gave his permission for Joe Capote to legally adopt Truman, with the only provision being that he retain the Persons name. But, Lillie Mae refused and won her case. In 1935, Truman became the legal son of Joe and was renamed Truman Garcia Capote. Truman saw little of his father after that time, although he did visit him in Mississippi and Louisiana in the summers of 1941 and 1942, with the second trip commemorated by Arch in the second postcard here. Years later, Arch would print another postcard of Truman from a photo taken in 1958 during a surprise visit he made to Arch in Shreveport with Harper Lee. Arch captioned with the picture with boasts of Trumans celebrity and recent accomplishments and sent the postcard to friends and customers. In 1974, when Arch was nearly 80 and convinced he was near death, he inscribed the present postcards to Truman. Truman was entering the final chapters of his own life (he and Arch would die within three years of each other), beginning his final descent into addiction and isolation. One postcard shows Truman smiling, seated on Archs lap in January 1932, according to the inscription, two months before his parents divorce. A printed caption reads, A Little Boy and His Father . . . the Fond Memory which lingers still, .. and always will . . . . . . A shaky hand underlines and always will. The second postcard shows Truman ten years older with a caption reading, Just a nice kid! So he described himself (and he really was) in 1942 at Monroe, Louisiana while visiting his father. Today he is a world figure in Literature and in Television. On the verso is his fathers note: 1897 1974 | An old card of long ago. This is how I hope to go out remembering you | Love, [illegible]. The signature can somehow read either Arch or Dad. Gerald Clarke. CAPOTE : A BIOGRAPHY (New York: Simon & Schuster, 1988).

$500.00

ART
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ART

By Bukowski, Charles; Roger Marcus (calligrapher)

Santa Barbara: Black Sparrow Press, 1977. First Edition. Softcover. Fine. Approximately 4¼ x 3 inches. [15] pp. Original blue wrappers, sewn, printed paper label. Fine, with lightly stained and worn original envelope included. A 1977 New Year's greeting issued gratis to the friends of the Black Sparrow Press. The main text is printed in one calligraphic word per page, "As the spirit wanes the form appears."

$100.00

THE BAD GIRL MARIE : A LITTLE MAN BOOK FOR 1942
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THE BAD GIRL MARIE : A LITTLE MAN BOOK FOR 1942

By Lowry, Robert; [James Flora (ill.)]

1942. Softcover. Very good. Flora, James. Approximately 6¼ x 5 inches. [16] pp. Original pink pictorial wrappers, saddle stapled, in matching dust jacket. Some wear to jacket, with small abrasion in front panel (not affecting cover image), soft crease at upper edge. Very good to near fine. One of 300 copies printed from handset New Caslon type by Robert Lowry at The Little Man Press, with wood and linoleum designs by James Flora.

$150.00

AU SEUIL DE LA 'PATAPHYSIQUE : ON THE THRESHOLD OF 'PATAPHYSICS . . . [with:] WHAT IS THE COLLEGE OF 'PATAPHYSICS? [broadside caption title]

By Shattuck, Roger; Philippe Dumarçay (illus.)

Charleville, France: Collège de 'Pataphysique, 1963. First Edition. Softcover. Very good. Dumarçay, Philippe. XC [i.e., 1963, the Feast of the Nativity of Alfred Jarry (1873-1907)]. [89],12-1,[2] pp. including numerous in-text illustrations. Printed wrappers. In French, English, Polish, Spanish, Italian, Russian, German, Latin, and Japanese. Ownership signature of Ned Polsky in front wrapper, inscription in his hand in rear wrapper verso, "New York City Jan. 1963 (from Seymour Hacker)." Covers worn and lightly soiled. Contents clean. Very good. With broadside, 27 x 21 cm. Printed correction pasted at bottom margin. Original horizontal fold. Neat 2-inch closed tear from right edge at fold. Right edge lightly chipped. Good. An introduction, in nine languages, to the undefinable (by definition) "science of imaginary solutions," by Roger Shattuck (1923-2005). Illustrated by Philippe Dumarçay (born 1932) with [xxx] and images of Alfred Jarry's Ubu Roi. The accompanying broadside is a flyer advertising membership in the College of 'Pataphysics, printed at Imprimerie de l'Ardennais at Charleville, and likely issued with some copies of the main title (OCLC records two copies of the broadside). From the collection of Ned Polsky (1928-2000), sociologist of mid-20th-century American counterculture and author of HUSTLERS, BEATS, AND OTHERS (Chicago, 1967).

$75.00

I REMEMBER
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I REMEMBER

By Brainard, Joe

New York: Angel Hair Books, 1970. First Edition. Softcover. Near fine. 10 inches tall. [36] pp. Pictorial wrappers, saddle-stapled. Covers lightly scuffed, else near fine. One of 700 unnumbered copies (of a total of 726) printed for Angel Hair Books by Chapel Press in Williamstown, Massachusetts. First edition of Brainard's celebrated prose-poem memoir. In 2001, Paul Auster called it a "masterpiece": "One by one, the so-called important books of our time will be forgotten, but Joe Brainard's modest little gem will endure. In simple, forthright, declarative sentences, he charts the map of the human soul and permanently alters the way we look at the world. I REMEMBER is both uproariously funny and deeply moving. It is also one of the few totally original books I have ever read.” Clay and Phillips, p. 179.

$550.00

MORE I REMEMBER
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MORE I REMEMBER

By Brainard, Joe

New York: Angel Hair Books, 1972. First Edition. Softcover. Near fine. 10 inches tall. [42] pp. Pictorial wrappers, saddle-stapled. Covers lightly rubbed and toned, else fine. One of 800 unnumbered copies (of a total of 826) printed for Angel Hair Books by Chapel Press in Williamstown, Massachusetts. First edition of Brainard's first follow-up to his 1970 prose-poem memoir classic, I REMEMBER. Clay and Phillips, p. 179.

$175.00

FRUITS OF THE WORLD IN DANGER
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FRUITS OF THE WORLD IN DANGER

By Baxter, Glen

New York: Gotham Book Mart, 1974. First Edition. Softcover. Near fine. Baxter, Glen. 11 inches tall. [7] leaves, leaves [2]-[7] printed recto only. Printed wrappers, side-stapled. Wrappers lightly toned, else fine. Six illustrations of fruits in extremis (an orange resting on a railroad track as train speeds towards it, a banana below a circular saw...), drawn by Glen "Colonel" Baxter, British artist and poet associated with the New York School. As an art student in Leeds during the early 1960s, Baxter encountered the writing of Frank O'Hara and developed an interest in New York School poetry and the mimeograph magazines then being introduced to London. After submitting some of his own pieces to ADVENTURES IN POETRY, in 1974 Baxter was invited to the U.S. to read at St. Mark's Church in-the-Bowery - "I stood at the lectern, dressed in a tweed suit, and began to speak. People burst into spontaneous laughter. I had arrived" (from a 2016 interview in LITERARY HUB). That same year, Gotham Book Mart began hosting shows of his work (at which Edward Gorey was an enthusiastic customer) and published two 11 x 8½-inch format books: FRUITS OF THE WORLD IN DANGER and THE HANDY GUIDE TO AMAZING PEOPLE.

$75.00

MORATORIUM: OCTOBER 15, 1969
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MORATORIUM: OCTOBER 15, 1969

By Sivack, Denis

New York: [The author], 1970. First Edition. Broadside. Near fine. Broadside, 14 x 11 inches. Light toning at right edge, else fine. Poetry broadside by writer and photographer Denis Sivack, recounting scenes of the day of the Moratorium to End the War in Vietnam mass demonstrations in New York. He drives in the morning from Staten Island, where he sees a Black army recuit staring into the distance, to Brooklyn, where he listens to variety of voices, including a representative of Women Strike for Peace, members of the Black Panthers, and the poet David Henderson, and finally to Washington Square in Greenwich Village, where he sees the statistics of the war dead on the Judson Memorial Church bulletin board and is left with the image of the darkness after a vigil's last candle "had burned to nothing and the last man had walked away." OCLC records two copies, at Brown and SUNY Buffalo (2017).

$100.00

FIRST PERSON : A JOURNAL OF TRAVEL, MEMOIRS & HUMOR (FIRST ISSUE / FALL 1960) [including Edward Gorey's LEAVES FROM A MISLAID ALBUM]
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FIRST PERSON : A JOURNAL OF TRAVEL, MEMOIRS & HUMOR (FIRST ISSUE / FALL 1960) [including Edward Gorey's LEAVES FROM A MISLAID ALBUM]

By Elevitch, M. D. (ed.); Thornton Wilder, Mark Twain, W. D. Howells, Patrick Brophy, Diana Athill, Allan Seagar, Edward Gorey, Ford Madox Ford, R. W. Lid, Robert Hellman, Anne Halley, Curtis Zahn, and Don Marie

Rockport, Massachusetts, 1960. First Edition. Softcover. Near fine. Gorey, Edward. 86,[2] pp., containing numerous in-text and full-page illustrations. Pictorial wrappers. Wrappers lightly shelf-worn, else near fine. First issue of a short-run literary magazine, including the first (partial) publication of Edward Gorey's story-without-words, LEAVES FROM A MISLAID ALBUM. LEAVES here contains eight full-pages illustrations of 17 that would later be published by Gotham Book Mart in 1972.

$30.00

ROBIN REDBREAST
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ROBIN REDBREAST

By Kunitz, Stanley

[S.l.: s.n.], 1971. First Edition. Broadside. Near fine. Broadside, 11 x 8½ inches. Printed in black on cream stock. Signed by Kunitz. Light wear at upper and lower edges, including minor one-inch crease at upper-left corner, else near fine. [ca. 1971.] Evidently the first fully separate broadside printing of Kunitz's well-loved poem about the discovery of a dying bird. In a separate publication (easily confused with the present one), the Worcester Poetry Festival printed the poem with an illustrated portrait of Kunitz in 1971 that also included a brief essay by and biography of Kunitz on the verso, together with information and advertising for the festival on both sides. This broadside, however, includes the poem alone with a copyright statement ("1971 by Stanley Kunitz") in the lower margin. A third broadside, also confused with this one, was printed in 1978 in two colors by Copper Canyon press. The present, ca. 1971 broadside is scarce, with OCLC recording correctly two copies, at Princeton and Ball State University - both signed.

$250.00

HORSES [cover title: HORSES : A POEM BY WENDELL BERRY]
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HORSES [cover title: HORSES : A POEM BY WENDELL BERRY]

By Berry, Wendell

Monterey, Kentucky: Larkspur Press, 1975. First Edition. Softcover. Fine. [1975.] [8] pp. Printed paper wrappers, stitched. Fine. Printed with type hand-set at the Larkspur press in an edition of 949 copies.

$75.00

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