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HOW TO ENTER VAUDEVILLE
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HOW TO ENTER VAUDEVILLE

By LaDelle, F. C. [i.e. Frederic La Delle, i.e. Frederick Clifford Kirkpatrick]

[S.l.: s.n.], 1910. First Edition. Good. [ca. 1910]. [2],20,[2] pp. Early 20th-century red cloth, manuscript paper label, original pink pictorial wrappers bound in. Author's notice pasted on front wrapper verso. Sticker label of Chanin's Studio of Magic on front pastedown. First publisher's advertising page inscribed, "No 42," in upper margin and, "Leo Keller," in lower margin in contemporary blue ink. Cloth worn, label chipped. Soft vertical fold in leaves, light abrasion to front wrapper in upper margin, small stains in final leaves. Good. A guide to aspiring vaudeville performers, containing various bits of practical advice, lists of booking agents and dealers in theatrical goods, a lexicon of stage terms, a brief history of vaudeville, and an autobiographical sketch of the author. Frederick LaDelle (stage name of Frederick C. Kirkpatrick, 1866-1941) began his career performing a trapeze act at an event in Newark, New Jersey provided for the benefit of striking Hatters' Union members. His success at the performance launched him into a professional circus career, working primarily as an aerialist, until he fell 35 feet during a show with the Adam Forepaugh circus, leaving him relatively unharmed but shaken. He then moved to the "less hazardous" work of a magician and vaudeville manager. In 1913, LaDelle would publish a longer work with "A Complete Illustrated Course of Instruction" appended to the title in Jackson, Michigan through the "Frederic LaDelle Co." The end of his memoir in the present edition mentions having performed an act with his family as the "LaDelle Troupe" since 1907. Those two dates suggest this pamphlet was published around 1910. Rare, with OCLC recording two copies, at Harvard and Brown.

$125.00

A LECTURE ON THE PHILOSOPHY OF SPECTRAL APPEARANCES, DELIVERED AT THE TOWN HALL, WINDSOR, BEFORE THE MEMBERS OF THE WINDSOR AND ETON MUTUAL IMPROVEMENT SOCIETY; AND AT THE LITERARY AND SCIENTIFIC INSTITUTION, WOODBRIDGE, SUFFOLK
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A LECTURE ON THE PHILOSOPHY OF SPECTRAL APPEARANCES, DELIVERED AT THE TOWN HALL, WINDSOR, BEFORE THE MEMBERS OF THE WINDSOR AND ETON MUTUAL IMPROVEMENT SOCIETY; AND AT THE LITERARY AND SCIENTIFIC INSTITUTION, WOODBRIDGE, SUFFOLK

By Stock, John

Windsor: Printed and Published by G. McArthur, 1840. First Edition. Hardcover. Good. [ca. 1840]. 45,[3] pp. Later three-quarter red polished calf and decorated boards, spine titled in gilt, marbled endpapers. t.e.g. Erratum slip tipped in. Armorial bookplate of F. Manley Sims on front free endpaper verso; inkstamp of Manley Sims Eton Collection on flyleaf verso and title page. Extremities rubbed, calf lightly stained; endpapers foxed; toning in gutter of several leaves from old ribbon. Good. Rare printed lecture on ghosts by English Baptist minister and liberal activist John Stock (1817-1884). Stock offers five arguments, theological and philosophical, against the reality of "spectral appearances" and five "natural and physical" explanations for them. The latter section includes several recent accounts of apparitions and their possible physiological, psychological, or atmospheric causes. The volume comes from the collection of the prominent British physician and surgeon Francis Manley Sims, F.R.C.S. (1841-1902). A Suffolk native and son of an Anglican minister, Manley Sims operated one of the largest medical practices in London's West End and served for more than twenty years as physician to Prince George, Duke of Cambridge. His biography in PLARR'S LIVES OF THE FELLOWS notes, "It is to his credit that he was very helpful and generous to poor patients, and possessing, as he did, the ear of a wealthy and influential clientele, he could often contrive a scheme of assistance in cases of sickness and misery that was practical besides being well meant. To do so was the greatest possible source of pleasure to him. He was a firm and generous friend, an interesting companion, full of reminiscences and experiences, and well read." OCLC locates two copies, at Oxford and the British Library.

$225.00

THE PALAEOGRAPHY COLLECTION : VOLUME 1 AUTHOR CATALOGUE [and] VOLUME 2 SUBJECT CATALOGUE

By [University of London Library]

Boston: G. K. Hall & Co., 1968. First Edition. Hardcover. Fine. Folio. 2 volumes. [4],579; [6],668 pp. Publisher's dark blue cloth, spines lettered in silver. Fine. Author and subject indexes of the noted paleography collection of the University of London library, photographically reproducing the original index cards. Due to the weight of this set, additional shipping charges will apply: please contact the seller before ordering.

$150.00

MIKE CAVENEY WONDERS : THE LONG, SLOW PROCESS OF CREATING MAGIC FOR THE REAL WORLD [and] THE CONFERENCE ILLUSIONS : RESEARCH, RETHINK, REBUILD, AND RESTAGE CLASSIC ILLUSIONS FROM MAGIC\'S GOLDEN AGE
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MIKE CAVENEY WONDERS : THE LONG, SLOW PROCESS OF CREATING MAGIC FOR THE REAL WORLD [and] THE CONFERENCE ILLUSIONS : RESEARCH, RETHINK, REBUILD, AND RESTAGE CLASSIC ILLUSIONS FROM MAGIC'S GOLDEN AGE

By Caveney, Mike; Bill Taylor (photography)

Pasadena: Mike Caveney's Magic Words, 2013. First Edition. Hardcover. Near fine. 2 volumes. Quarto. 455; 255 pp. including 900 color and black-and-white photographic in-text illustrations. Original half maroon imitation leather and green cloth, stamped in gold, silver, and black, in original green cloth slipcase, stamped in gold. Half title of WONDERS inscribed, "For Johnny Fox | Never stop wondering. With best regards from your old friend... Mike Caveney 2014." Half title of THE CONFERENCE ILLUSIONS inscribed, "Johnny | Enjoy this journey through The Golden Age of Magic. Mike Caveney 2014." Light shelf wear to slipcase, else fine. Johnny Fox's set of fellow magician, scholar, and collector Mike Caveney's magnum opus, with both volumes signed and warmly inscribed to Fox by the author. Caveney published the set in 2013 to "document basically everything" he had performed during his career. The first volume, MIKE CAVENEY WONDERS, describes and illustrates the major tricks and illustions Caveney developed over the long course of his own career, each accompanied with a detailed explanation of the creative process behind it - with a hope, he writes, to "teach and encourage the readers how to create their own original routines." The second volume, THE CONFERENCE ILLUSIONS, turns to great routines of past performers that Caveney recreated during 22 years of the Los Angeles Conference of Magic History, in some instances with the original apparatus of the likes of Howard Thurston and Charles Carter. The present set comes from the collection of Johnny Fox (1953-2017), the celebrated American sword swallower, sleight-of-hand artist, and proprietor of the Freakatorium / El Museo Loco, the first dime museum to appear in New York since the closing of Hubert's Museum in 1969. Located in a Lower East Side storefront from 1999 to 2005, the Freakatorium housed a collection of oddities, relics, photographs, and ephemera largely relating to human anomalies and sideshow performers, as well as a small reference library, of which this volume was a part. Due to the weight of this set, additional shipping charges will apply: please contact the seller before ordering.

$400.00

[Cabinet Card Photograph of One-Legged Acrobat Georg Fabig]
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[Cabinet Card Photograph of One-Legged Acrobat Georg Fabig]

By Fabig, Georg; Schaller, W. A. (photographer)

Berlin: W. A. Schaller, Theater-Agentur, 1875. First Edition. Photograph. Near fine. [ca. 1870s]. Cabinet card (albumen print mounted on card), approximately 6 1/4 x 4 1/4 inches. Printed caption, "Georg Fabig, einbeiniger Handacrobat," pasted in lower margin. Subject's autograph signature and rubber stamp of W. A. Schaller theater agency on verso. Mild wear and fading. Near fine. Cabinet card portrait of the one-legged circus acrobat, Georg Fabig, evidently issued by his Berlin talent agent, W. A. Schaller, whose rubber stamp appears on the verso. The item was part of the collection of the late Johnny Fox (1953-2017), the celebrated sword swallower, sleight-of-hand artist, and proprietor of the Freakatorium / El Museo Loco, the first dime museum to appear in New York since the closing of Hubert's Museum in 1969. Located in a Lower East Side storefront from 1999 to 2005, the Freakatorium housed a collection of oddities, relics, photographs, and ephemera largely relating to human anomalies and sideshow performers.

$200.00

MISS MILLIE CHRISTINE [carte de visite (CDV)]
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MISS MILLIE CHRISTINE [carte de visite (CDV)]

By [McCoy, Millie & Christine; Louis Bertin (photographer)]

Brighton [England]: [Louis] Bertin, 1872. First Edition. Photograph. Near fine. [1872]. Gelatin silver photograph, mounted as carte de visite, approximately 3 1/2 x 2 1/2 inches. Caption on recto, photographer's stamp on verso. Light wear, upper and lower margins trimmed close, with loss to design element in lower margin. Very good. Portrait of the conjoined twin sisters, Millie and Christine McCoy (1851-1912), taken during their 1871-1872 tour of England. The twins, often referred to collectively as "Millie-Christine" or "The Two-Headed Nightingale," were among the most widely viewed, scrutinized, and applauded human marvels of the 19th century. Billing them often as the "Eighth Wonder of the World," promoters touted the fact that the girls were joined at the lower spine, more intimately attached than Chang and Eng, the original Siamese Twins. Audiences drawn to see the twins' remarkable anatomy left astonished likewise by their musical talents, radiant personalities, and moving story. Born into slavery in Columbus County, North Carolina in 1851, Millie and Christine were a spectacle from infancy. Already the object of "pilgrimage" by curious neighbors in the surrounding region, by the age of ten months they were sold to a showman for the sum of $1000, and over the next five years they passed through the hands of both bidders and kidnappers, who exhibited them privately to prodding physicians at publicly at dime museums and county fairs. At the age of two, they disappeared in New Orleans, and their legal title was transferred to Joseph Pearson Smith, the guarantor of the manager who had lost them. Smith engaged the services of a private investigator, who discovered the twins in England, and in 1857 Smith and Millie and Christine's mother, Monemia McCoy, traveled across the Atlantic and staged a dramatic rescue at the Birmingham theater where the girls were then performing. Upon their return to the U.S., Millie and Christine moved to the homestead of the Smith family in Wadesboro, North Carolina, where both of their parents and all of their siblings had also been transferred after purchase by the Smiths from their original slaveholders. Mrs. Smith taught the girls how to sing and dance and, against state law, how to read and write. In short time, the sisters developed famous acts that featured keyboard duets and vocal harmonies, with Millie singing alto and Christine soprano. Mr. Smith served as their manager, a role that his son, Joseph Pearson Smith, Jr., would assume upon the death of the former in 1862. While it was the Emancipation Proclamation and end of the Civil War - not the Smiths, themselves - that freed the McCoys, Joseph Jr. remained Millie and Christine's manager for most of their career, and the two families, by all accounts, maintained a genuinely warm relationship. As the girls progressed through adolescence, they successfully took increasingly greater control of both their career and their bodies, refusing further anatomical inspections from curious doctors and scientists they felt would violate their privacy. As their stage shifted from theaters and salons to the circuses of the 1870s and 1880s, Millie and Christine remained wildly popular and successful. They settled into retirement back in Columbus County, where they had long cared for family, friends, and neighbors, built a Methodist church and a school for African American children, and quietly but generously supported several black colleges and institutes throughout North Carolina. The present carte de visite was made at the studio of French photographer Louis Bertin in the English resort town of Brighton, where Millie and Christine completed their 1871-1872 tour of Britain with the giants Anna Swan and Martin Bates. During that tour, Swan and Bates were married at St. Martin's Church in Trafalgar Square; Millie and Christine preceded the pair in the ceremony up the aisle. Whether the photo here was taken during the tour's final stop or earlier on is not certain. Bertin made at least one other carte de visite of the girls during the trip, in which they are wearing a different dress and in which the caption on the card does not include the "Miss" in the "Miss Millie Christine" caption here.

$250.00

[Cabinet Card Photograph of Charles Tripp, "The Armless Wonder"]
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[Cabinet Card Photograph of Charles Tripp, "The Armless Wonder"]

By [Tripp, Charles B.; Pentz, Bransby Cooper (photographer)]

York, Pa.: Pentz, Photographer, 1887. First Edition. Photograph. Near fine. [1887]. Cabinet card (albumen print mounted on card), approximately 6 1/2 x 4 1/4 inches. Photographer's stamp and Inscription and signature of subject on verso, in his foot. Light wear, near fine. Cabinet card portrait of Charles Tripp, "The Armless Wonder," inscribed and signed by him, evidently during a tour in York, Pennsylvania, where the photograph was taken. Charles Broton Tripp (1855-1930) was one of the great human marvels of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Born without arms, Tripp taught himself at a young age how to dress, eat, shave, write, and perform a variety of other tasks with his feet. He had become particularly noted for his calligraphy and woodworking skills when he left home for New York City at the age of 17 to seek employment with P. T. Barnum. Barnum immediately hired him, and Tripp would perform for the circuses of Barnum, Bailey, and the Ringling Brothers for the next 35 years and later for smaller carnivals. Throughout his career, Tripp inscribed and sold cabinet cards and postcards printed with his portrait, which typically shows him dressed in a fine suit and surrounded by instruments and products of his trade. The present photograph is a fine example, showing Tripp carving a piece of wood and exhibiting examples of his calligraphy and a paper doll he had created, presumably with the pair of shears lying in front of it. The portrait was made at the Pentz studio of York, Pennsylvania, and bears the following inscription in Tripp's foot: "Charles B. Tripp. Woodstock, Ontario Age 32 y's. William Kennedy July 30th 87." The cabinet card comes from the collection of the Johnny Fox (1953-2017), the celebrated American sword swallower, sleight-of-hand artist, and proprietor of the Freakatorium / El Museo Loco, the first dime museum to appear in New York since the closing of Hubert's Museum in 1969. Located in a Lower East Side storefront from 1999 to 2005, the Freakatorium housed a collection of oddities, relics, photographs, and ephemera largely relating to human anomalies and sideshow performers. During his performances, Fox often described his first childhood encounters with sideshow performers and adoption of them as his personal heroes. Charles Tripp was one of his favorite historical examples, and it is clear that Tripp's contemporaries had held him in similar esteem. A newspaper in Salisbury, North Carolina, where Tripp spent his winters, published a tribute upon his death that read in part, "He never let the words 'I can't' enter his vocabulary and the fine accomplishments and achievements despite handicaps should be a challenge to those of us who possess all our faculties. He was a real hero in every sense of the word and overcame odds in life that would have submerged many a man with less determination and spirit."

$600.00

[Cabinet Card Photograph of Snake Handler]
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[Cabinet Card Photograph of Snake Handler]

By [Circus]

[S.l.: s.n.], 1885. First Edition. Photograph. Very good. [ca. mid 1880s]. Cabinet card (albumen print mounted on card), approximately 6 1/2 x 4 1/4 inches. Subject's smiling face from a different photograph pasted on verso. Mild wear, tiny dent and stains in print, lower margin of card scuffed, light staining on verso. Very good. Cabinet card ortrait of a young woman snake handler, in white circus dress, gazing at the face of a boa constrictor draped over her shoulders. The subject and photographer are both unknown, but the plain, dark cabinet card mount suggests date of production in the mid 1880s, a significant period in the history of the American circus. The item was part of the collection of the late Johnny Fox (1953-2017), the celebrated American sword swallower, sleight-of-hand artist, and proprietor of the Freakatorium / El Museo Loco, the first dime museum to appear in New York since the closing of Hubert's Museum in 1969. Located in a Lower East Side storefront from 1999 to 2005, the Freakatorium housed a collection of oddities, relics, photographs, and ephemera largely relating to human anomalies and sideshow performers.

$150.00

I REMEMBER
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I REMEMBER

By Brainard, Joe

New York: Angel Hair Books, 1970. First Edition. Softcover. Near fine. 10 inches tall. [36] pp. Pictorial wrappers, saddle-stapled. Covers lightly rubbed, corners lightly bumped, else near fine. One of 700 unnumbered copies (of a total of 726) printed for Angel Hair Books by Chapel Press in Williamstown, Massachusetts. First edition of Brainard's celebrated prose-poem memoir. In 2001, Paul Auster called it a "masterpiece": "One by one, the so-called important books of our time will be forgotten, but Joe Brainard's modest little gem will endure. In simple, forthright, declarative sentences, he charts the map of the human soul and permanently alters the way we look at the world. I REMEMBER is both uproariously funny and deeply moving. It is also one of the few totally original books I have ever read.” Clay and Phillips, p. 179.

$450.00

MORE I REMEMBER
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MORE I REMEMBER

By Brainard, Joe

New York: Angel Hair Books, 1972. First Edition. Softcover. Near fine. 10 inches tall. [42] pp. Pictorial wrappers, saddle-stapled. Covers lightly rubbed, corners lightly bumped, else near fine. One of 800 unnumbered copies (of a total of 826) printed for Angel Hair Books by Chapel Press in Williamstown, Massachusetts. First edition of Brainard's first follow-up to his 1970 prose-poem memoir classic, I REMEMBER. Clay and Phillips, p. 179.

$200.00

[Erotic Fore-Edge Painting in:] THE POETICAL WORKS OF JOHN MILTON . . . THE "ALBION" EDITION
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[Erotic Fore-Edge Painting in:] THE POETICAL WORKS OF JOHN MILTON . . . THE "ALBION" EDITION

By Milton, John

London and New York: Frederick Warne and Co., 1896. Hardcover. Near fine. 607,[1] pp. Contemporary goat, ruled in blind, spine stamped in gold, raised bands, a.e.g., fore-edge painting. Front free endpaper verso inscribed, "Oliffe Richard from his tutor July 30 - 96. 2nd in school work." 20th-century bookplate of O. L. Richmond. Light wear to edges and joints, else fine. A turn-of-the-century Milton anthology given to a British student by his tutor and (presumably later) painted with an explicit sexual scene hidden in the fore-edge. The original owner appears to have been a 14-year-old Oliffe Leigh Richmond (1881-1977), who would grow to become a poet and classical scholar.

$600.00

TWINS
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TWINS

By Mark, Mary Ellen

New York: Aperture, 2003. First Edition. Hardcover. Fine/near fine. Mark, Mary Ellen. Folio. [85],86-94,[2] pp. including numerous in-text photographic images. Publisher's cloth, spine stamped in silver. Signed and inscribed by the author/photographer, "For Valeria Johnny + Isabella With Love Mary Ellen 2005." Dust jacket lightly rubbed. Fine in a near fine dust jacket. Portraits of twins by the late photographer, Mary Ellen Mark (1940-2015), known for her work with unusual people. Mark photographed and interviewed the subjects at the annual Twins Days festival in Twinsburg, Ohio, in 2001 and 2002. This copy was warmly inscribed to Johnny Fox and his wife at the time, Valeria Duarte (and their dog, Isabella). Johnny Fox (1953-2017) was a celebrated American sword swallower, sleight-of-hand artist, and proprietor of the Freakatorium / El Museo Loco, the first dime museum to appear in New York since the closing of Hubert's Museum in 1969. Located in a Lower East Side storefront from 1999 to 2005, the Freakatorium housed a collection of oddities, relics, photographs, and ephemera largely relating to human anomalies and sideshow performers, as well as a small reference library, of which this volume was a part.

$125.00

AMERICAN ODYSSEY 1963-1999
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AMERICAN ODYSSEY 1963-1999

By Mark, Mary Ellen

New York: Aperture, 1999. First Edition. Hardcover. Fine/very good. Mark, Mary Ellen. Folio. 151,[1] pp. including numerous in-text photographic images. Publisher's cloth, spine stamped in silver. Signed and inscribed by the author/photographer, "For Valeria + Johnny - I also _love_ the side show Fondly Mary Ellen 2003 New York." Some rubbing and a few small dents in dust jacket. Fine in a very good dust jacket. 36-year portrait retrospective of the late Mary Ellen Mark (1940-2015), who was named the previous year "Most Influential Woman Photographer" by AMERICAN PHOTO magazine. This copy was warmly inscribed to Johnny Fox and his wife at the time, Valeria Duarte, in the year of publication. Johnny Fox (1953-2017) was a celebrated American sword swallower, sleight-of-hand artist, and proprietor of the Freakatorium / El Museo Loco, the first dime museum to appear in New York since the closing of Hubert's Museum in 1969. Located in a Lower East Side storefront from 1999 to 2005, the Freakatorium housed a collection of oddities, relics, photographs, and ephemera largely relating to human anomalies and sideshow performers, as well as a small reference library, of which this volume was a part.

$225.00

¡DEATH, BROTHER OF SLEEP; HOLY PRIMAEVAL KING! [caption title]
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¡DEATH, BROTHER OF SLEEP; HOLY PRIMAEVAL KING! [caption title]

By [Tyler, Richard Oviet]

[New York]: Hand set & Printed at Uranian Press by R.O.T. [i.e. Richard O. Tyler], 1960. First Thus. Broadside. Near fine. [ca. 1960]. Broadside, 11 x 8½ inches. Printed in black on salmon paper. Embossed seal of the Uranian Press and rubber stamp of Uranian Tract Society in lower margin. Two horizontal folds, else fine.Fine An early "tract" broadside printed by the Uranian Press and issued in a slightly form in the 1960 DEATH TRACTS broadside portfolio. In the Uranian Press tract style, two lines of text (here, "¡Death, brother of sleep;" and "Holy Primaeval King!") are printed above and below a relief print. The print adds the text, "INJECTED IT INTO HIS VAIN | SEE WHETHER THE SHOTS WILL HELP THE DISEASE," around a fairly inscrutable image. Richard Oviet Tyler (1926-1983) established the Uranian Press in 1958 in the basement of a tenement on the Lower East Side where, by 1960, he had installed four printing presses. Under the Uranian imprint, Tyler, his wife, Dorothea Baer Tyler, and friends produced chapbooks, broadsides, and artist's books through the mid-1960s. Tyler was a fixture in Greenwich Village during this period, selling the Press's wares from a pushcart in the yard of Judson Memorial Church, a nod to both contemporary Jewish peddlers of the Lower East Side and the chapmen of Elizabethan England. He played an important, if still underappreciated, role in the nascent expanded arts movements of the New York avant garde scene with both the Press and its performance arm, the Uranian Alchemical Players. The Uranian circle expanded into a quasi-religious collective incorporating Jungian and Gnostic ideas of creativity and consciousness, LSD, Western astrology, alchemy, Tibetan Buddhism, and the political thought of Charles Fourier, becoming known officially in 1974 as the Uranian Phalanstery. OCLC records no copies of this separate edition.

$125.00

CREATIVITY AS A MANTIC PROCEDURE OF THE INTUITIVE FUNCTION
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CREATIVITY AS A MANTIC PROCEDURE OF THE INTUITIVE FUNCTION

By [Tyler, Richard Oviet]

New York: Hand Set & Printed by Michael Martin & David Lewis, apprentices at Uranian Press N.Y.C., 1960. First Edition. Softcover. Near fine. Bifolium, [4] pp., with 2 inserted leaves (printed rectos only), all 12 x 9 inches, printed in red and black on brown paper. Light wear at edges, 1¾- inch crease in outer edge of first leaf, else near fine. The existential manifesto of the Uranian Press, presenting the original basis of Tylers integrative vision of art, life, creativity, and journeys through forms of consciousness. Its main text, printed in three pages on a bifolium, is supplemented with two broadside inserts, one of which introduces the manifesto: In this this paper Creativity is to be understood in the sense of a Self Documented life work toward a more fully integrated individual, able to bridge consciousness between these states, & impart the result in a symbol system seeking to evolve self transcendence to the point of holding in consciousness the knowledge of unity with the universe. From his decision to leave Chicago in 1958 to his final years conducting underground tattoo and burial ceremonies under the aegises of the Uranian Phalanstery and the First New York Gnostic Lyceum Temple, Tyler was committed to the vision outlined in this document. He also increasingly came to know the very real dangers with which exploration of this dark & terrible, spaceless primordial realm is fraught. He warns in both Creativitys main text and a second broadside insert about these risks: demon possession, the nihilistic necromancer becom[ing] the False Magician, the Yang & Yin balance of Violent, vandalistic, nihilistic, Murderous destruction. Stefan Brecht, who dedicates a chapter of his history of the Bread and Puppet Theater to Tyler, suggests that Tyler ultimately succumbed to those dangers, casting him as both an influence on and a kind of antithesis to Bread and Puppets founder, Peter Schumann. In their early acquaintance, the two had both seen the threat of nuclear war as crucial, contemporary fact, saw it as a symptom of the preponderant form of madness, rational madness, and saw as only salvation a mass transformation of consciousness from the intellectual to the intuitive (Brecht, p. 68). Whereas Schumanns sacrifice of consciousness, however, called on radical love traditions and archetypes from Christian sources, leading him to become a major, transformative player in the peace movement, Brecht contends that Tylers art was stuck in the sacrifice alone the mission is reported on, not any achievement of it (p. 66). Peter Schumanns son, Max Schumann, himself remembers Tyler as part genius, part madman and has long been engaged with his art and philosophy, recently curating the first major retrospective of Tylers work, The Schizophrenic Bomb, at Printed Matter. He contrasts Tylers work not with Bread and Puppets but with the commercial gallery culture surrounding Tyler on one hand and insipid New Age movements that emerged around him, using similar symbolic systems, on the other. Tyler defied them all to the end, not only not being engaged or aspiring to high art or the institutions of arts just completely not recognizing the values and remaining fully committed to an integrated art-life practice that never yielded its dark, death current to facile spiritual formulas (Lynch, 2017). A rare and significant document in postwar psychic exploration and American antiestablishment art. OCLC records two copies, at Northwestern and the Harry Ransom Center.Sources: Dennis Lynch, "Rolling Out a Slice of Village Art Psychedelia," in [online publication], April 6, 2017.

$500.00

THE PARANOID\'S PRIMER : CONTAINING SOME NOTES ON RAY MACHINE REALITY AND DEUS EX MACHINA OR THE \'S\' BOMB TOGETHER WITH A MODUS OPERANDI, FOR SCHIZOTHYMIC AGT.\'S
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THE PARANOID'S PRIMER : CONTAINING SOME NOTES ON RAY MACHINE REALITY AND DEUS EX MACHINA OR THE 'S' BOMB TOGETHER WITH A MODUS OPERANDI, FOR SCHIZOTHYMIC AGT.'S

By Tyler, Richard Oviet; [Claes Oldenburg & Jim Dine]

New York: Uranian Press, 1961. First Edition. Softcover. Fine. Tyler, Richard. [28] pp. including in-text woodcut and deep etch relief illustrations. Original green wrappers, printed in red, side-stapled. Numbered and signed in pencil by Richard Tyler on the publisher's page over his rubber-stamped monogram. Seal of Uranian Press embossed in title leaf. Fine. Numbered 41 of 300 copies. An early and important work of visionary artist Richard O. Tyler's Uranian Press, "Offered not only as an Object of Curiosity & Entertainment, but as a Work of Real & Substantial USE." Richard Oviet Tyler (1926-1983) established the Uranian Press in 1958 in the basement of a tenement on the Lower East Side where, by 1960, he had installed four printing presses. Under the Uranian imprint, Tyler, his wife, Dorothea Baer Tyler, and friends produced chapbooks, broadsides, and artist's books through the mid-1960s. Tyler was a fixture in Greenwich Village during this period, selling the Press's wares from a pushcart in the yard of Judson Memorial Church, a nod to both contemporary Jewish peddlers of the Lower East Side and the chapmen of Elizabethan England. He played an important, if still underappreciated, role in the nascent expanded arts movements of the New York avant garde scene with both the Press and its performance arm, the Uranian Alchemical Players. The Uranian circle expanded into a quasi-religious collective incorporating Jungian and Gnostic ideas of creativity and consciousness, LSD, Western astrology, alchemy, Tibetan Buddhism, and the political thought of Charles Fourier, becoming known officially in 1974 as the Uranian Phalanstery. THE PARANOID'S PRIMER brings together three works reflecting Tyler's interest in nuclear-apocalyptic fears, Jungian psychology, Western astrology, and psychosis. The first is referred to in the text as a revised version of "Some Notes on Ray Machine Reality," which had been written by Tyler originally for the Ray Gun Documents series and printed for the Ray Gun Exhibition of 1960 at Judson Church Gallery by Claes Oldenburg and Jim Dine. The second, "Deus ex Machina or the 'S' Bomb," was printed separately by Tyler the same year as the PRIMER. It contains a double-page deep-etch relief print in red, "The Schizophrenic Bomb : An Artifice for Armageddon," a nightmarish city scene that would become one of Tyler's best-known images. The text, printed the same year as Michael Hollingshead famous first meetings with Timothy Leary, includes one of the earliest counterculture references to LSD. The final piece, "Modus Operandi for Schizothymic Agt's," comprises a series of quotations from psychiatry textbooks, Jung's writings, and other sources, as well as an advertisement for "The Complete Assassin's Kit for disassociated anarchists" ($5) on the final page.A fine, clean example, without the rusting in the staples affecting many copies. OCLC records six copies.

$200.00

I CH TH U S : Iesos CHristos THeou Uíos Soter . . . [caption title]
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I CH TH U S : Iesos CHristos THeou Uíos Soter . . . [caption title]

By [Baer, Dorothea (Tyler) [ill.]]

[New York]: Uranian Press, 1962. First Edition. Broadside. Near fine. Baer, Dorothy [Tyler]. [ca. 1962]. Broadside, approximately 6½ x 5½ inches. Printed in red on green paper. Embossed with seal of Uranian Press in lower margin. Signatures of Dorothea Baer and Richard O. Tyler over rubber stamps of their monograms on verso. Faint toning at bottom edge, else fine. Small Uranian press broadside of the ancient Christian symbol of the fish, in a decorative border, signed in the print by Dorothea Baer Tyler with her "d.b.t." monogram. The caption prints, "ICHTHUS," the Greek word for fish, as an acronym for the Greek words for "Jesus Christ, Son of God, Saviour." No date is provided for the print, but circa 1962 is likely; that year, "ichthus" was also printed on the cover of the Uranian Press's 1962 portfolio, 9 GNOSTIC TRACTS (there, in Greek letters), in red on green paper. Dorothea Baer Tyler frequently alternated, as she does here between the initials in the print and those in her monogram on the verso, between using "Baer Tyler" and "Baer" alone.Dorothea Baer (1926-2012) cofounded the Uranian Press in 1958 with her husband, Richard Oviet Tyler (1926-1983) shortly after the two moved to New York City from Chicago, where both had attended the School of the Art Institute. By 1960, they had installed four printing presses in the basement of a Lower East Side tenement. Under the Uranian imprint, the Tyler and their friends produced chapbooks, broadsides, and artist's books through the mid-1960s. Later, they would produce photcopied flyers and zines as the Uranian Tract Society and Uranian Phalanstery. During the late 1950s and early 1960s, Tyler was a fixture in Greenwich Village in the late 1950s and early 1960s, selling the Press's wares from a pushcart in the yard of Judson Memorial Church, a nod to both contemporary Jewish peddlers of the Lower East Side and the chapmen of Elizabethan England. He played an important, if still underappreciated, role in the nascent expanded arts movements of the New York avant garde scene with both the Press and its performance arm, the Uranian Alchemical Players. The Uranian circle expanded into a quasi-religious collective incorporating Jungian and Gnostic ideas of creativity and consciousness, LSD, Western astrology, alchemy, Tibetan Buddhism, and the political thought of Charles Fourier, becoming known officially in 1974 as the Uranian Phalanstery. After the death of Richard in 1983, Baer maintained the Phalanstery until her own death in 2012; it survives today under the care of her protégé, Mehdi Matin.

$75.00

BIOGRAPHY OF A FLOWER [cover title]. VERSES "THE GOSPEL OF TRUTH" : A VALENTINIAN MEDITATION 2nd CEN. GNOSTIC : WOODCUTS : DOROTHEA BAER : 20th CEN. MYSTIC
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BIOGRAPHY OF A FLOWER [cover title]. VERSES "THE GOSPEL OF TRUTH" : A VALENTINIAN MEDITATION 2nd CEN. GNOSTIC : WOODCUTS : DOROTHEA BAER : 20th CEN. MYSTIC

By Valentinus; Dorothy Baer [Tyler] (ill.)

New York: Uranian Press, 1963. First Edition. Softcover. Fine. Baer, Dorothy [Tyler]. [20] pp., including 8 in-text woodcut illustrations. Original pictorial wrappers, printed in red on black paper, tied with red string. Text printed in black and red. Fine. Verses from the "Gospel of Truth" manuscript discovered in the Nag Hammadi library and attributed to the 2nd-century Gnostic Valentinus, here illustrated in eight woodcuts by Dorothea Baer (1926-2012), artist and co-founder of the Uranian Press. The verses and illustrations - the latter largely through the imagery of the life cycle of a flower - both touch on themes of coming into being, material reality, divine revelation, and spiritual knowledge. Dorothea Baer (1926-2012) cofounded the Uranian Press in 1958 with her husband, Richard Oviet Tyler (1926-1983) shortly after the two moved to New York City from Chicago, where both had attended the School of the Art Institute. By 1960, they had installed four printing presses in the basement of a Lower East Side tenement. Under the Uranian imprint, the Tyler and their friends produced chapbooks, broadsides, and artist's books through the mid-1960s. Later, they would produce photcopied flyers and zines as the Uranian Tract Society and Uranian Phalanstery. During the late 1950s and early 1960s, Tyler was a fixture in Greenwich Village in the late 1950s and early 1960s, selling the Press's wares from a pushcart in the yard of Judson Memorial Church, a nod to both contemporary Jewish peddlers of the Lower East Side and the chapmen of Elizabethan England. He played an important, if still underappreciated, role in the nascent expanded arts movements of the New York avant garde scene with both the Press and its performance arm, the Uranian Alchemical Players. The Uranian circle expanded into a quasi-religious collective incorporating Jungian and Gnostic ideas of creativity and consciousness, LSD, Western astrology, alchemy, Tibetan Buddhism, and the political thought of Charles Fourier, becoming known officially in 1974 as the Uranian Phalanstery. After the death of Richard in 1983, Baer maintained the Phalanstery until her own death in 2012; it survives today under the care of her protégé, Mehdi Matin.

$100.00

THE MISCHANCES OF MORLEY PERUS IN THE UNIVERSAL MIND : PART THE FIRST
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THE MISCHANCES OF MORLEY PERUS IN THE UNIVERSAL MIND : PART THE FIRST

By Tyler, Richard Oviet

New York: Uranian Press, 1960. First Edition. Softcover. Very good. Tyler, Richard Oviet. [24] pp. including in-text woodcut illustrations by Tyler. Original orange wrappers, printed in black, side-stapled. Numbered and signed in pencil by Richard Tyler on the publisher's page over his rubber-stamped seal. Seal of Uranian Press embossed in title leaf. Light rust stains in gutter from staples; light foxing at top edge of text leaves; light dampstain, advancing no more than 1/8 inch from bottom edge of rear wrapper. Very good. Numbered 15 of 300 copies. One of the first chapbooks printed by the Uranian Press. The Press's 1959 advertising broadside, ELIZABETHAN BALLADS, describes the 18th-century chapbook as "'the literature of the illiterate,' enjoyed by a populace of elementary taste and childlike intelligence... . [Its] grand & naive treatment of of myth & legend, illustrated with 'fantastic woodcuts', was highly prized in Queen Anne's time." THE MISCHANCES OF MORLEY PERUS is a hallucinatory homage to that genre - a dense, violent, psycho-philosophical dialogue between seven characters, illustrated with nightmarish woodcuts, all by the visionary artist and founder of the Uranian Press Richard O. Tyler. Richard Oviet Tyler (1926-1983) established the Uranian Press in 1958 in the basement of a tenement on the Lower East Side where, by 1960, he had installed four printing presses. Under the Uranian imprint, Tyler, his wife, Dorothea Baer Tyler, and friends produced chapbooks, broadsides, and artist's books through the mid-1960s. Tyler was a fixture in Greenwich Village during this period, selling the Press's wares from a pushcart in the yard of Judson Memorial Church, a nod to both contemporary Jewish peddlers of the Lower East Side and the chapmen of Elizabethan England. He played an important, if still underappreciated, role in the nascent expanded arts movements of the New York avant garde scene with both the Press and its performance arm, the Uranian Alchemical Players. The Uranian circle expanded into a quasi-religious collective incorporating Jungian and Gnostic ideas of creativity and consciousness, LSD, Western astrology, alchemy, Tibetan Buddhism, and the political thought of Charles Fourier, becoming known officially in 1974 as the Uranian Phalanstery. OCLC records four copies.

$125.00

MUCKLEFOOT MISCELLANY
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MUCKLEFOOT MISCELLANY

By Kaplan, Victor Lorenz (poetry); Dorothea Baer [Tyler] (woodcuts)

New York: Hand set in Caslon Old Face & Priory Text, by M. Martin & C. Skalba, apprentices, & printed at Uranian Press N.Y.C., 1960. First Edition. Broadside. Fine. Tyler, Dorothea Baer. 4 broadsides, approximately 20 x 8½ inches, in original printed paper folder, 21 x 8¾ inches. Printed on tan paper. Signed and numbered in pencil on front cover of folder by Baer and Kaplan. Front cover of folder embossed with seal of the Uranian Press. Fine. Numbered 298 of 400 copies. The first Uranian Press "Broadside Ballads Folio," inspired by the the blackletter broadside ballad of Elizabethan England, advertised in the 1960 Uranian Press Catalogue One, and sold by Uranian Press founder Richard O. Tyler in the Judson Church Yard in Greenswich Village. The poems are composed by Victor Lorenz Kaplan, a.k.a. Ralph Mucklefoot, type set by young apprentices Michael Martin and Conard Skalbo, and illustrated with woodcuts by Dorothea Baer, wife of Richard Tyler and co-founder of the Uranian Press and the later Uranian Phalanstery. The first three broadsides, "Simple Simon," Of Hodge wrack'd by the New Plaguge & Mucklefoot's Prescription of Deliverance," and "Ralph O' Bellvue," bear 1959 imprints and are presumably the items referred to in the Press's 1959 ELIZABETHAN BALLADS broadside. The fourth broadside, "A Fable for Foxes," and printed folder bear 1960 imprints. Richard Oviet Tyler (1926-1983) established the Uranian Press in 1958 in the basement of a tenement on the Lower East Side where, by 1960, he had installed four printing presses. Under the Uranian imprint, Tyler, his wife, Dorothea Baer Tyler, and friends produced chapbooks, broadsides, and artist's books through the mid-1960s. Tyler was a fixture in Greenwich Village during this period, selling the Press's wares from a pushcart in the yard of Judson Memorial Church, a nod to both contemporary Jewish peddlers of the Lower East Side and the chapmen of Elizabethan England. He played an important, if still underappreciated, role in the nascent expanded arts movements of the New York avant garde scene with both the Press and its performance arm, the Uranian Alchemical Players. The Uranian circle expanded into a quasi-religious collective incorporating Jungian and Gnostic ideas of creativity and consciousness, LSD, Western astrology, alchemy, Tibetan Buddhism, and the political thought of Charles Fourier, becoming known officially in 1974 as the Uranian Phalanstery. OCLC records six copies.

$200.00

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