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THE VILLAGE BEAT SCENE: SUMMER 1960 [Offprint from Summer 1961 Issue of DISSENT]
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THE VILLAGE BEAT SCENE: SUMMER 1960 [Offprint from Summer 1961 Issue of DISSENT]

By Polsky, Ned

[New York: Dissent Publishing], 1961. First Separate Edition. Softcover. Near fine. [1961]. 23 pp. Printed self-wrappers, saddle-stapled. Tiny stain (one-eighth inch) at fore-edge of front wrapper, light toning in wrappers, else fine. The first published sociological account of beat counterculture, here in a scarce offprint from the Summer 1961 "New York, N.Y." issue of DISSENT magazine. The article would later be published in Polsky's 1967 HUSTLERS, BEATS, AND OTHERS. Ned Polsky (1928-2000) taught sociology for a number of years at SUNY Stony Brook before joining the antiquarian book trade in his retirement. He first came to national attention in 1957 with his critique of Norman Mailer's essay, "The White Negro: Superficial Reflections on the Hipster" - his response, and Mailer's counter-response, were published in both City Lights' book version of Mailer's essay and the Winter 1958 issue of DISSENT. (Polsky was less Sanguine than Mailer about the validity of both the white male hipster's sexual revolutionariness and racial radicalism. On the fomer topic: "When Mailer glamorizes the hipsters' 'search after the good orgasm' he is simply accepting at face value their rationalization for what is in truth a pathetic, driven sex life in which the same failures are repeated again and again. On this matter as on others, Mailer confuses the life of action with the life of acting out.") In the present study, Polsky differentiates the "hipster" from the "beat" (see below) and covers a broad range of topics, including anti-bourgeois attitudes, work (and oppostition to work), sex and sexuality, race, drugs (especially marijuana and heroin), and jazz. On beats vs. hipsters: "Until recently 'hipster' simply meant one who is hip, roughly the equivalent of a beat. Beats recognized that the hipster is more of an 'operator' - has a more consciously patterned lifestyle (such as a concern to dress well) and makes more frequent economic raids on the frontiers of the square world - but stressed their social bonds with hipsters, such as their liking for drugs, for jazz music, and, above all, their common scorn for bourgeois career orientations. Among Village beats today, however, 'hipster' usually has a pejorative connotation: one who is a mannered showoff regarding his hipness, who 'comes on' too strongly in hiptalk, etc. In their own eyes, beats are hip but definitely not hipsters" (pp. 3-4).

$100.00

FOUR DIALOGUES : FOR TWO VOICES AND TWO PIANOS
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FOUR DIALOGUES : FOR TWO VOICES AND TWO PIANOS

By Rorem, Ned (music) & Frank O'Hara (words)

New York: Boosey & Hawkes, 1969. First Edition. Softcover. Near fine. Joe Brainard. 12 inches. 63 pp. Color pictorial wrappers, saddle-stapled. Near fine. Sheet music for a 20-minute "Quartet of Dialogues" by Ned Rorem for man and woman (either soprano and tenor or mezzo-soprano and baritone) and two pianos, with words by Frank O'Hara. Rorem describes the genesis of the piece and its first performance in the introduction: "The late Frank O'Hara conceived the words to THE QUARREL SONATA (as he first called it) expressly to be set by me for the unique combination of two voices and two pianos. This was accomplished early in 1954, mostly in London and Paris. The premiere took place the following year at a private concert in the Contessa Pecci Blunt's Roman palazzo. The lavishly somnolent old-world décor seemed gorgeously anachronistic to our glib and non-poetry and vulgar music which, in their comic-strip tightness, pre-dated Pop Art by a decade." The "Quartet of Dialogues" follow the relationship of a man and a woman, first strangers who meet on "The Subway," court in a car parked at "The Airport," fight in "The Apartment," and finally separate, singing over the ocean to each other "In Spain and in New York." With a comics-inspired cover by Joe Brainard.

$150.00

A GRAPHIC METHOD OF RECORDING SONGS. . . REPRINTED FROM THE BOAS MEMORIAL VOLUME
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A GRAPHIC METHOD OF RECORDING SONGS. . . REPRINTED FROM THE BOAS MEMORIAL VOLUME

By Goddard, Pliny Earle

New York: [s.n.], 1906. First Separate Edition. Softcover. Good. 137-142 pp. including two in-text figures, table, and musical notation, plus folding plate. Original printed wrappers. Wrappers detached and significantly chipped and discolored, pencil and ink inscriptions and ownership inkstamp in front wrapper, internally clean. Good. A scarce offprint of an article by American linguist and ethnologist Pliny Earle Goddard on a method of recording sung music directly to paper through the use of a kymograph equipped with a mouthpiece and "vowel recorder." The article includes illustrations of the equipment and an example, in the folding plate, of a Hupa song (also shown in standard musical notation) recorded by this method. Goddard (1869-1928) was an American linguist and ethnologist noted for his work on the Athabaskan peoples of North America. He was closely associated during the 1910s and 1920s with Franz Boas, who invited him to work with him at the American Museum of Natural History in 1909.

$75.00