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THE PSYCHEDELIC THEATRE PRESENTS [caption title]
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THE PSYCHEDELIC THEATRE PRESENTS [caption title]

By [Leary, Timothy]

[New York: Timothy Leary Defense Fund, 1966]. First Edition. Broadside. Very good. Broadside, 8 x 16 inches, folded into four printed panels. Verso bears "Timothy Leary Defense Fund" return address inkstamp, postmark, and printed label addressed to Ned Polsky. Four pairs of staple holes, some wear and uneven toning. Good to very good. Mailed flyer promoting a benefit for Timothy Leary's legal defense fund on May 22, 1966, at the Open Stage on St. Mark's Place, with a performance of the Psychedelic Theatre. Leary had been sentenced in March to 30 years in prison and and fined $30,000 for carrying a small (and disputed) amount of marijuana across the Mexican border into the U.S. His conviction would be overturned in 1969. The Psychedelic Theatre was a multimedia show that had recently emerged at the Hitchcock Estate in Millbrook, New York, Timothy Leary's highly-trafficked residence of the mid-1960s. While Leary was traveling in India in 1964, photographer Arnie Hendin appeared at Millbrook and showed a series of slides from two projectors accompanied by music and mirrors (and LSD) to Michael Hollingshead, the Harvard researcher who had introduced Leary to LSD three years earlier. Astonished by Hendin's work, Hollingshead asked if he knew "any other photographers who were his peers in these realms," learned about a man named Gabi living in the East Village, and left the next day to pick him up in Manhattan. After Hollingshead returned to Millbrook with Gabi, a Tibetan monkey, an iguana, and a crow, the multimedia show developed further and began drawing additional collaborators. The Psychedelic Theatre's first public performance took place at the Village Vanguard on April 5, 1965, featuring, among others, Richard Alpert (Ram Dass), Alan Watts, Charlie Mingus, Leary's daughter Susan, and a dancer named Mario. Hollingshead later wrote in his memoirs, THE MAN WHO TURNED ON THE WORLD (London, 1973), that the "Psychedelic Theatre arose out of something like the cave-paintings of primitive man interested in constructing a piece of reality from the flux. It was a theatre of controlled spontaneity, offered not as a virtuoso performance by a signature-artist, but as a sensory embrace." In its brief text, the present mailer refers to the threefold energy of creation, negation, and reconciliation, as expressed by the Hindu Trimurti, "the Einsteinian matra E=mc<2>," and Hermann Hesse's Glass Bead Game (and, by extension, the Castalia Foundation at Millbrook). A scarce Leary ephemeron, addressed to Ned Polsky (1928-2000), sociologist of mid-20th-century American counterculture and author of HUSTLERS, BEATS, AND OTHERS (Chicago, 1967).

$75.00

THE HEATHEN CHINEE ["Plain Language from Truthful James"]
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THE HEATHEN CHINEE ["Plain Language from Truthful James"]

By Harte, Bret; Joseph Hull [ill.]

Chicago: The Western News Company, 1870. First Separate Edition. Softcover. Very good. 9 numbered lithographic cards, 7 1/4 x 5 1/2 inches. Titled envelope lacking. Some toning, light soiling, and wear. Very good. The pirated, first separate issue of Bret Harte's famous and famously misunderstood satire, after its first appearance in the September, 1870, issue of San Francisco's THE OVERLAND MAGAZINE. The poem, a parody of Swinburne's ATALANTA, begins with a game of euchre between the narrator, his friend Bill Nye, and a Chinese immigrant, Ah Sin. Nye is engraged when his own attempt at cheating with cards up his sleeve is foiled by Ah Sin's superior efforts at the same. After complaining about being "ruined by Chinese cheap labor," Nye sets upon Ah Sin, and "a scene" ensues. Of the three versions of the poem illustrated in 1870 and 1871, the present set, illustrated by Joseph Hull, is unique in depicting the "scene that ensued" as a white mob attacking Ah Sin. As both a writer and newspaper editor, Bret Harte had long spoken out against white anti-Chinese bigotry and violence, which he had intended for this poem to mock. The irony was lost to the wider public, however, and Joseph Hull's illustrations helped fuel the wild popularity of the poem and its use as a rallying cry against Chinese immigrants.

$90.00

No. 38. IN SENATE, FEBRUARY 10, 1836. MEMORIAL OF THE MEDICAL SOCIETY OF THE STATE OF NEW-YORK, IN RELATION TO INSANE PAUPERS
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No. 38. IN SENATE, FEBRUARY 10, 1836. MEMORIAL OF THE MEDICAL SOCIETY OF THE STATE OF NEW-YORK, IN RELATION TO INSANE PAUPERS

By [Medical Society of the State of New York]

[Albany: New York Senate, 1836]. First Edition. Disbound. Near fine. [2] pp. Single leaf, disbound. Stab holes, minor edge toning, else near fine. Petition by the Medical Society of the State of New York to the state legislature to build an adequate home and hospital for the mentally ill. Signed in print by 28 members of the Society, the document refers to an estimated 2000 "lunatics" in the state with no means for treatment or care (at the time, New York's sole incorporated asylum could house only 250 patients and its only private facility 60). Confident in new possibilities for successful treatment, the petitioners argue that "justice and humanity" call the state to "restore that unfortunate portion of our population to reason, their friends and the community."

$65.00

CONSIDÉRATIONS SUR LE RÉGIME DES PRISONS, ADRESSÉES AU CONSEIL GÉNÉRAL DE LA SEINE-INFÉRIEURE DANS SA SESSION DE 1839
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CONSIDÉRATIONS SUR LE RÉGIME DES PRISONS, ADRESSÉES AU CONSEIL GÉNÉRAL DE LA SEINE-INFÉRIEURE DANS SA SESSION DE 1839

By Fauquet, M. J. [Jacques-Daniel]

Rouen: Imprimerie de L.-S. Lefevre, 1839. First Edition. Softcover. Very good. 45 pp. In French. Disbound, original printed wrappers retained. Early ink inscription in front wrapper. Some wear and mild foxing. Very good. Discussion on prison reform presented to the General Council of the Lower Seine by Jacques-Daniel Fauquet, Mayor of Bolbec. Fouquet examines the Auburn and Philadelphia models of penal labor and solitary confinement, as reported upon by Beaumont and Tocqueville earlier in the decade and since adopted by other institutions in the U.S. and Great Britain. He concludes that the Philadelphia system offers the most practical, humane, and effective system for France and votes for its establishment there. The address is followed by a section of notes on Auburn and Philadelphia-model prisons in the U.S., Scotland, and Geneva.

$75.00

BREAD
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BREAD

By [Schumann, Peter]

Glover, Vermont: Bread and Puppet, 1984. First Edition. Softcover. Fine. Peter Schumann et al.. Quarto. [16] pp. including illustrations. Original pictorial self-wrappers, stapled. A fine copy. First edition of Bread and Puppet founder Peter Schumann's essay on and recipe for Silesian bread, illustrated with numerous photographic and woodcut images.

$50.00