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Most valuable Architecture books

Curious what the most valuable and expensive architecture books are? Below is a small sample of some of the most expensive books that have sold on Biblio.com:


Recent Arrivals in Architecture

Architecture

From Brunelleschi's Dome to Make Your Own Handcrafted Doors & Windows, from The Dynamics Of Architectural Form to The Growth Of the English House, we can help you find the architecture books you are looking for. As the world's largest independent marketplace for new, used and rare books, you always get the best in service and value when you buy from Biblio.com, and all of your purchases are backed by our return guarantee.



Top Sellers in Architecture

    Brunelleschi's Dome by Ross King

    Ross King was born in Canada in 1962 and completed a PhD in English Literature at York University in Toronto. He is the author of two novels, Domino , soon to be made into a film, and Ex-Libris . He lives near Oxford.


    The Death and Life Of Great American Cities by Jane Jacobs

    Jane Jacobs was born on May 4, 1916, in Scranton, Pennsylvania. Her father was a physician and her mother taught school and worked as a nurse. After high school and a year spent as a reporter on the Scranton Tribune , Jacobs went to New York, where she found a succession of jobs as a stenographer and wrote free-lance articles about the city's many working districts, which fascinated her. In 1952, after a number of writing and editing jobs ranging in subject matter from metallurgy to a geography of the United States for foreign readers, she became an associate editor of Architectural Forum . She was becoming increasingly skeptical of conventional planning beliefs as she noticed that the city rebuilding projects she was assigned to write about seemed neither safe, interesting, alive, nor good economics for cities once the projects were built and in operation. She gave a speech to that effect at Harvard in 1956, and this led to an article in Fortune magazine entitled "Downtown Is for People," which in turn led to The Death and Life of Great American Cities . The book was published in 1961 and produced permanent changes in the debate over urban renewal and the future of cities. In opposition to the kind of large-scale, bulldozing government intervention in city planning associated with Robert Moses and with federal slum-clearing projects, Jacobs proposed a renewal from the ground up, emphasizing mixed use rather than exclusively residential or commercial districts, and drawing on the human vitality of existing neighborhoods: "Vital cities have marvelous innate abilities for understanding, communicating, contriving, and inventing what is required to combat their difficulties.... Lively, diverse, intense cities contain the seeds of their own regeneration, with energy enough to carry over for problems and needs outside themselves." Although Jacobs's lack of experience as either architect or city planner drew criticism, The Death and Life of Great American Cities was quickly recognized as one of the most original and powerfully argued books of its day. It was variously praised as "the most refreshing, provocative, stimulating, and exciting study of this greatest of our problems of living which I have seen" (Harrison Salisbury) and "a magnificent study of what gives life and spirit to the city" (William H. Whyte). Jacobs is married to an architect, who she says taught her enough to become an architectural writer. They have two sons and a daughter. In 1968 they moved to Toronto, where Jacobs has often assumed an activist role in matters relating to development and has been an adviser on the reform of the city's planning and housing policies. She was a leader in the successful campaign to block construction of a major expressway on the grounds that it would do more harm than good, and helped prevent the demolition of an entire neighborhood downtown. She has been a Canadian citizen since 1974. Her writings include The Economy of Cities (1969); The Question of Separatism (1980), a consideration of the issue of sovereignty for Quebec; Cities and the Wealth of Nations (1984), a major study of the importance of cities and their regions in the global economy; and her most recent book, Systems of Survival (1993).


    Building Construction Illustrated by Francis D K Ching

    Includes bibliographical references and index.


    Architecture by Francis D K Ching

    Includes bibliographical references (p. 409) and indexes


    Experiencing Architecture by Steen Eiler Rasmussen

    2nd Edition


    The Architecture Of Happiness by Alain De Botton

    Alain de Botton is the author of three works of fiction and five of nonfiction, including How Proust Can Change Your Life, The Consolations of Philosophy, and The Art of Travel. He lives in London.


    City Of Quartz by Mike Davis

    Mike Davis is the author of several books including Planet of Slums , City of Quartz , Ecology of Fear , Late Victorian Holocausts , and Magical Urbanism . He was recently awarded a MacArthur Fellowship. He lives in Papa’aloa, Hawaii.


    Design Of Cities by Edmund N Bacon

    "The major contemporary work on urban design . . . Splendidly presented, filled with thoughtful and brilliant intuitive insights." — The New Republic In a brilliant synthesis of words and pictures, Edmund N. Bacon relates historical examples to modern principles of urban planning. He vividly demonstrates how the work of great architects and planners of the past can influence subsequent development and be continued by later generations. By illuminating the historical background of urban design, Bacon also shows us the fundamental forces and considerations that determine the form of a great city. Perhaps the most significant of these are simultaneous movement systems—the paths of pedestrian and vehicular traffic, public and private transportation—that serve as the dominant organizing force, and Bacon looks at movement systems in cities such as London, Rome, and New York. He also stresses the importance of designing open space as well as architectural mass and discusses the impact of space, color, and perspective on the city-dweller. That the centers of cities should and can be pleasant places in which to live, work, and relax is illustrated by such examples as Rotterdam and Stockholm.


    The King's England by Mee Arthur



    Design With Nature by Ian L McHarg



    Skyscraper by Karl Sabbagh



    Architecture Without Architects by Bernard Rudofsky



    Space, Time and Architecture by Sigfried Giedion



    Fundamentals Of Building Construction by Edward Iano, Joseph Allen



    The Timeless Way Of Building by Christopher Alexander



    Early American Inns and Taverns by Elise Lathrop



    Color Drawing by Michael E Doyle



    Modern Architecture by Kenneth Frampton



    The Arts by Hendrik Willem Van Loon



    An Age Of Barns by Eric Sloane



    The Poetics Of Space by Gaston Bachelard



    Ghosts Along the Mississippi by Clarence John Laughlin



    Make Your Own Handcrafted Doors & Windows by John Birchard



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