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Juvenile Fiction & Literature book


Most valuable Juvenile Fiction & Literature books

Curious what the most valuable and expensive juvenile fiction & literature books are? Below is a small sample of some of the most expensive books that have sold on Biblio.com:


Recent Arrivals in Juvenile Fiction & Literature

Juvenile Fiction & Literature

From To Kill a Mockingbird to Child's Garden Of Verses, A, from Trixie Belden to Drums, Girls and Dangerous Pie, we can help you find the juvenile fiction & literature books you are looking for. As the world's largest independent marketplace for new, used and rare books, you always get the best in service and value when you buy from Biblio.com, and all of your purchases are backed by our return guarantee.



Top Sellers in Juvenile Fiction & Literature

    To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee

    To Kill a Mockingbird is a Pulitzer Prize-winning novel by Harper Lee published in 1960. It was instantly successful and has become a classic of modern American literature. The plot and characters are loosely based on the author's observations of her family and neighbors, as well as on an event that occurred near her hometown in 1936, when she was 10 years old. The novel is renowned for its warmth and humor, despite dealing with serious issues of rape and racial inequality.


    Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen

    Pride and Prejudice is a novel by Jane Austen. First published on 28 January 1813, it was her second published novel. Its manuscript was initially written between 1796 and 1797 in Steventon, Hampshire, where Austen lived in the rectory. Originally called First Impressions, it was never published under that title, and in following revisions it was retitled Pride and Prejudice.


    Harry Potter and The Sorcerer's Stone by J K Rowling

    Harry Potter and The Sorcerer's Stone (Harry Potter #1) J. K. Rowlings amazing first novel, H arry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone , was released as Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone in the United States. We start off by meeting Harry Potter and his horrible family. Harry is an orphan, and lives in a tiny room under the stairs, serving his family by cooking and cleaning. One day, he gets a letter from the Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardy, and his life takes a serious turn! Join Harry as he explores Hogwarts, makes lasting friendships, and begins his life as an intrepid young wizard in this award-winning story! Winner of:  British Fantasy Award (1999) , Mythopoeic Fantasy Award for Adolescent Literature (2008) , British Book Award for Children's Book of the Year (1998) , Smarties Prize (1997) , Prijs van de Nederlandse Kinderjury (2002) ...more Prijs van de Nederlandse Kinderjury (2002) , Rebecca Caudill Young Reader's Book Award (2001) , South Carolina Book Award for Junior Book Award (2001) , Grand Canyon Reader Award for Teen Book (2000) , Charlotte Award (2000) , Nene Award (2000) , Massachusetts Children's Book Award (2000) , Colorado Blue Spruce Young Adult Book Award (2001) , Blue Hen Book Award for Chapter Book (2001) , Nevada Young Readers' Award for Young Reader Category (2000) , Sasquatch Reading Award (2000) , Golden Archer Award for Middle/Junior High (2000) , Indian Paintbrush Book Award (2000) , Carnegie Medal Nominee (1997) , ALA's Top Ten Best Books for Young Adults (1999)


    Harry Potter and The Half-Blood Prince by J K Rowling

    Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince, released on 16 July 2005, is the sixth of seven novels from British author J. K. Rowling's popular Harry Potter series. Set during Harry Potter's sixth year at Hogwarts, the novel explores Lord Voldemort's past, and Harry's preparations for the final battle amidst emerging romantic relationships and the emotional confusions and conflict resolutions characteristic of mid-adolescence.


    The Catcher In the Rye by J D Salinger

    Published in 1951, The Catcher in the Rye has become a common part of high school and college curricula throughout the English-speaking world and has been translated into all major languages. Since its publication with a $3.00 sticker, it has reportedly sold more than 65 million copies. The novel's antihero, Holden Caulfield, has become a cultural icon for teenage rebellion. Due to its liberal use of profanity and portrayal of sexuality and teenage angst, it has frequently been met with censorship challenges in the United States making it one of the most challenged books of the 20th century.


    Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte

    Jane Eyre is a famous and influential novel by English writer Charlotte Brontë. It was published in London, England in 1847 by Smith, Elder & Co. with the title Jane Eyre. An Autobiography under the pen name "Currer Bell". (Harper & Brothers of New York came out with the American edition in 1848.)


    Alice's Adventures In Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass by Lewis Carroll

    Both of the Alice books have engendered wonder and mystery in children and adult readers alike. Quite different from the film and animation adaptations, Alice's adventures introduce her to the White Rabbit, the Queen of Hearts, the Mock Turtle, the Mad Hatter, and many more odd inhabitants of Wonderland.


    Harry Potter and The Goblet Of Fire by J K Rowling

    Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire (Harry Potter, #4) keeps having horrible dreams that wake him with the scar on his forehead throbbing. He is relieved to return to the magical realm from his summer break early to attend the Quidditch World Cup with the Weasleys, but the relief quickly gives way to a dark threat that looms over the magical world. Being a teenager is hard enough without having a Dark Lord seeking your destruction! Hugo Award for Best Novel (2001) , Mythopoeic Fantasy Award for Adolescent Literature (2008) , Publieksprijs voor het Nederlandse Boek (2001) , Golden Archer Award for Middle/Junior High (2002) , Indian Paintbrush Book Award (2002)  


    Harry Potter and The Order Of the Phoenix by J K Rowling

    Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix (Harry Potter, #5) shows us how the plot begins to thicken in this  renowned series.  The tale grows darker and becomes psychologically intense as the teenaged boy wizard much handle his social life as well as the dark forces that seek to take him down! The greater community begins to doubt Harry and the existence of Voldemort's return, and Hogwarts is overtaken by an oppressive representative from the Ministry of Magic.  We meet the dread Dementors, and Harry loses loved ones in this tale of his exhausting fifth year! Bram Stoker Award for Works for Young Readers (2003) , Anthony Award for Young Adult (2004) , Mythopoeic Fantasy Award for Adolescent Literature (2008) , Books I Loved Best Yearly (BILBY) Awards for Older Readers (2004) , Colorado Blue Spruce Young Adult Book Award (2006) ...more Colorado Blue Spruce Young Adult Book Award (2006) , Golden Archer Award for Middle/Junior High (2005) , ALA Teens' Top Ten (2004) , Carnegie Medal Nominee (2003)


    Giver by Lois Lowry

    The Giver is a 1993 novel by Lois Lowry. It is set in a future society which is at first presented as a utopian society and gradually appears more and more dystopian; therefore, it could be considered anti-utopian. The novel follows a boy named Jonas through the twelfth year of his life. The society has eliminated pain and strife by converting to "Sameness", a plan which has also eradicated emotional depth from their lives.


    The Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain

    Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (often shortened to Huck Finn) is a novel written by Mark Twain and published in 1884. It is commonly regarded as one of the Great American Novels, and is one of the first major American novels written in the vernacular, characterized by local color regionalism. It is told in the first person by Huckleberry "Huck" Finn, best friend of Tom Sawyer and narrator of two other Twain novels.


    Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte

    Wuthering Heights is Emily Brontë's only novel. It was first published in 1847 under the pseudonym Ellis Bell, and a posthumous second edition was edited by her sister Charlotte. The name of the novel comes from the Yorkshire manor on the moors on which the story centers (as an adjective, Wuthering is a Yorkshire word referring to turbulent weather).


    Harry Potter and The Deathly Hallows by J K Rowling

    Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows is the seventh and final of the Harry Potter novels written by British author J. K. Rowling. The book was released on 21 July 2007, ending the series that began in 1997 with the publication of Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone. This book chronicles the events directly following Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince (2005), and leads to the long-awaited final confrontation between Harry Potter and Lord Voldemort.


    A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens

    A Christmas Carol in Prose, Being a Ghost Story of Christmas (commonly known as A Christmas Carol) is a book by English author Charles Dickens, that was first published on 19 December, 1843. with illustrations by John Leech. Dickens called it his "Little Christmas Book". The first of the author's five "Christmas books," (a new literary genre created incidentally) the story was instantly successful, selling over six thousand copies in one week.


    Treasure Island by Robert Louis Stevenson

    Treasure Island is an adventure novel by Robert Louis Stevenson. The story was originally serialised in the children's magazine Young Folks under the title The Sea Cook over a period of several months from 1881-82. Traditionally considered a coming-of-age story, Treasure Island is the classic pirate tale, known for its superb atmosphere, character and action. It is one of the most frequently dramatised of all novels. The influence of Treasure Island on popular perception of pirates is vast, including treasure maps with an "X", schooners, the Black Spot, tropical islands, and one-legged seamen with parrots on their shoulders. 


    Hunger Games - Audio by Suzanne Collins

    The Hunger Games (2008) is a young-adult science fiction novel written by Suzanne Collins. It was originally published in hardcover on September 14, 2008 by Scholastic. It is the first book of the Hunger Games trilogy. It introduces sixteen-year-old Katniss Everdeen, who lives in a post-apocalyptic world where a powerful government called the Capitol has risen up after several devastating disasters.


    The Pilgrim's Progress by John Bunyan

    The Pilgrim's Progress from This World to That Which Is to Come is a Christian allegory written by John Bunyan and published in February, 1678. It is regarded as one of the most significant works of English literature, has been translated into more than 200 languages, and has never been out of print.


    The Adventures Of Tom Sawyer by Mark Twain

    The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, by Mark Twain, is a popular 1876 novel about a young boy growing up in the antebellum South on the Mississippi River in the town of St. Petersberg, based on the town of Hannibal, Missouri.


    The Wind In the Willows by Kenneth Grahame

    The Wind in the Willows is a classic of children's literature by Kenneth Grahame, first published in 1908. Alternately slow moving and fast paced, it focuses on four anthropomorphised animal characters in a pastoral version of England. The novel is notable for its mixture of mysticism, adventure, morality, and camaraderie. The Wind in the Willows was in its thirty-first printing when then-famous playwright, A. A. Milne, who loved it, adapted a part of it for stage as Toad of Toad Hall in 1929.


    The Outsiders by S E Hinton

    In Hinton's story, The Outsiders, the main character Ponyboy tells us that there are two kinds of people in the world: greasers and socs. Those who are poor and on the outside, and those who have more than they could ever use. Ponyboy struggles with the legal heat, the emotional backlash of being unacceptable to society, and maintaining the tough facadé necessary to keep alive. Ponyboy and the other greasers maintain their struggle with the soc gangs until the game finally gets too hot and someone gets killed. Books I Loved Best Yearly (BILBY) Awards for Secondary (1991)


    Harry Potter and The Prisoner Of Azkaban by J K Rowling

    Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban (Harry Potter, #3) The adventures of Harry Potter and his friends continue in the third book in this world-acclaimed series. When Voldemort killed Harry Potter's parents, he didn't do it alone - he had help from his network of dark wizards.  For twelve years, the horrid prison Azkaban has held one of those wizards - an infamous man named Sirius Black. This man has now escaped - and is expected to be heading straight for Hogwarts and Harry Potter! Bram Stoker Award for Best Work for Young Readers (1999) , Locus Award for Best Fantasy Novel (2000) , Whitbread Award for Children's Literature , Mythopoeic Fantasy Award for Adolescent Literature (2008) , Smarties Prize (1999) ...more Smarties Prize (1999) , Costa Book Award (1999) , Books I Loved Best Yearly (BILBY) Awards for Older Readers (2005) , Colorado Blue Spruce Young Adult Book Award (2004) , Maine Student Book Award (2000) , Golden Archer Award for Intermediate (2001) , Indian Paintbrush Book Award (2004) , Soaring Eagle Book Award (2002)


    Twilight by Stephenie Meyer

    When seventeen-year-old Bella leaves Phoenix to live with her father in Forks, Washington, she meets an exquisitely handsome boy at school for whom she feels an overwhelming attraction and who she comes to realize is not wholly human.


    Eragon by Christopher Paolini

    Eragon is the first book in the Inheritance Cycle by Christopher Paolini. Paolini began writing the book at the age of fifteen. After writing the first draft for a year, he spent a second year rewriting it and fleshing out the story and characters. Paolini's parents saw the final manuscript and decided to self-publish Eragon. Paolini spent a year traveling around the United States promoting the novel. By chance, the book was discovered by Carl Hiaasen, who got it re-published by Alfred A.


    Child's Garden Of Verses, A by Robert Louis Stevenson

    Rediscover the delight and innocence of childhood in these classic poems from celebrated author, Robert Louis Stevenson.From make-believe to climbing trees, bedtime stories to morning play and favourite cousins to beloved mothers.Here is a very special collection to be treasured for ever.


Juvenile Fiction & Literature Books & Ephemera


    Trixie Belden by Kenny, Kathryn

    Trixie Belden is the title character in a series of 'girl detective' mysteries written between 1948 and 1986. The first six books were written by Julie Campbell Tatham, who also wrote the Ginny Gordon series, then continued by various in-house writers from Western Publishing under the pseudonym Kathryn Kenny. Today the rights to the series are owned by Random House.


    Black Beauty by Sewell, Anna

    Black Beauty is an 1877 novel by English author Anna Sewell. It was composed in the last years of her life, during which she was confined to her house as an invalid. The novel became an immediate bestseller, with Sewell living just long enough (five months) to see her first and only novel become a success. Although not originally intended as a children's novel, but for people who work with horses, it soon became a children's classic.


    The Secret Garden by Burnett, Frances Hodgson

    Frances Hodgson Burnetts' timeless tale The Secret Garden introduces us to a sour little girl. Mary Lennox is NOT a pleasure to be around. In fact, she yells like a little princess, can't make friends, and simply despises everything. She remains quite contrary until she helps her garden grow - and finds someone worse off than herself to bring along for the ride.  Closed off in a creepy manor house on the Yorkshire moors, how can children expect to grow towards the light?


    Heidi by Spyri, Johanna

    Heidi's Years of Wandering and Learning, usually abbreviated Heidi, is a novel about the events in the life of a young girl in her grandfather's care, in the Swiss Alps. It was written as a book "for children and those who love children" as quoted from its subtitle in 1880 by Swiss author Johanna Spyri. Two sequels, Heidi Grows Up and Heidi's Children, were not written by Spyri, but by her English translator, Charles Tritten. The Heidi books are among the best-known works of Swiss literature.


    The Tale Of Peter Rabbit by Potter, Beatrix

    The Tale of Peter Rabbit is a children's book written and illustrated by Beatrix Potter. The story follows Peter Rabbit, a mischievous and disobedient young rabbit, as he ventures into the garden of farmer Mr. McGregor. The tale was written for five-year-old Noel Moore, son of Potter's former governess, in 1893. It was revised and privately printed by Potter in 1901 after several publishers' rejections but was printed in a trade edition by Frederick Warne & Co. in 1902.


    Anne Of Green Gables by Montgomery, L M

    Anne of Green Gables is the first novel by Canadian author Lucy Maud Montgomery. The story tells of the adventures of Anne Shirley, an 11-year-old orphan girl who is mistakenly sent to Matthew and Marilla Cuthbert, a middle-aged brother and sister who had intended to adopt a boy to help them on their farm in Prince Edward Island. Like many of her contemporaries, Montgomery did not consider submitting her first novel to a Canadian publisher, convinced that a more lucrative deal could be made with an American firm. The novel was completed in 1905, but was rejected by four major American publishing houses, and it was not until 1907 that Montgomery found a publisher. L.C. Page & Co. finally published Anne of Green Gables in 1908. Anne of Green Gables has sold more than 50 million copies and has been translated into more than 30 languages. Following the success of her first novel, Montgomery went on to write seven more books about Anne, following the beloved protagonist through adulthood and motherhood. Several novels in the series have been adapted and made into a successful television miniseries. Montgomery museums, plays, and houses on Prince Edward Island draw international visitors.


    The Jungle Book by Kipling, Rudyard

    RUDYARD KIPLING was born in Bombay in India in 1865 to British parents, and brought by a Portuguese 'ayah' (nanny) and an Indian servant, who would entertain him with fabulous stories and Indian nursery rhymes. He was sent back to England when he was seven years old, and lived in a boarding house with a couple who were cruelly strict. Fortunately he returned to India aged 16, to work as the assistant editor of a newspaper in Lahore. He began publishing stories and poems and eventually had great success with his book Plain Tales from the Hills . After his marriage Kipling settled in America, and it was here that he wrote The Jungle Book . He then moved with his family to England, where he wrote Just So Stories for his daughter Josephine who tragically died of pneumonia. Rudyard Kipling was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1907 and died on January 18, 1936.


    Artemis Fowl by Colfer, Eoin

    Twelve-year-old villain, Artemis Fowl, is the most ingenious criminal mastermind in history. His bold and daring plan is to hold a leprechaun to ransom. But he's taking on more than he bargained for when he kidnaps Captain Holly Short of the LEPrecon (Lower Elements Police Reconnaissance Unit). For a start, leprechaun technology is more advanced than our own. Add to that the fact that Holly is a true heroine and that her senior officer Commander Root will stop at nothing to get her back and you've got the mother of all sieges brewing!


    The Night Before Christmas by Moore, Clement C

    "A Visit from St. Nicholas ", also known as " The Night Before Christmas" and "'Twas the Night Before Christmas " from its first line, is a poem first published anonymously in 1823 . This famous poem helped to cement the image of Santa Claus from the description of his appearance, his transportation, and how he brings the gifts to children on Christmas eve.


    The Wizard Of Oz by Baum, L Frank

    When Nancy searches through the knapsack of an amnesia victim, she finds an unusual ring. Before long, she is caught up in a second assignment from a beautiful harpist. Nancy's discoveries reveal an important connection between the hospital patient, the harpist, and enemies from abroad.


    Touching Spirit Bear by Mikaelsen, Ben

    Touching Spirit Bear is a 2001 teen's novel written by the American author, Ben Mikaelsen.


    Getting the Girl by Zusak, Markus

    When Dogs Cry is the third young-adult fiction novel written by Australian writer Markus Zusak in the Wolfe family books. It is a stand alone companion novel (sequel) to his young-adult fiction novels Fighting Ruben Wolfe and The Underdog. It was first published in 2001 by Pan Macmillan Australia Pty limited. It was published in United States by Arthur A. Levine Books, an imprint of Scholastic Press, April 2003 under the title Getting the Girl.


    Kidnapped by Stevenson, Robert Louis

    ROBERT LOUIS STEVENSON was born in Edinburgh in 1850. He was an intelligent but sickly child and so he started to make up stories to entertain himself. He once wrote, 'I have three powerful impressions of childhood: my sufferings when I was sick, my delights in convalescence at my grandfather's manse of Colinton, near Edinburgh, and the unnatural activity of my mind after I was in bed at night.' During the summer of 1881, Stevenson and his family were staying in a cottage in Braemar in Scotland. One afternoon he began drawing a map to amuse his stepson, but found that he himself was carried away, 'As I pored upon my map of "Treasure Island", the future characters of the book began to appear there visibly among imaginary woods: and their brown faces and bright weapons peeped out upon me from unexpected quarters... the next thing I knew, I had some papers before me and was writing out a list of chapters'. And so Treasure Island was begun and published in 1881. Robert Louis Stevenson is the author of Kidnapped and The Children's Garden of Verses as well as the adult book, The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde . During his short life Stevenson travelled the world from the South Pacific to the USA, Europe to Australia. He died at the age of 44 years old on a small Samoan island in the Pacific.


    Pinkalicious by Kann, Victoria



    Warriors by Hunter, Erin



    Drums, Girls and Dangerous Pie by Jordan, Sonnenblick-



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