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Juvenile Nonfiction book


Most valuable Juvenile Nonfiction books

Curious what the most valuable and expensive juvenile nonfiction books are? Below is a small sample of some of the most expensive books that have sold on Biblio.com:


Recent Arrivals in Juvenile Nonfiction

Juvenile Nonfiction

From Alice's Adventures In Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass to Doctor Dolittle's Circus, from Oxford Reading Tree to Ladybird Baby Touch, we can help you find the juvenile nonfiction books you are looking for. As the world's largest independent marketplace for new, used and rare books, you always get the best in service and value when you buy from Biblio.com, and all of your purchases are backed by our return guarantee.


Top Sellers in Juvenile Nonfiction

    Alice's Adventures In Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass by Lewis Carroll

    Lewis Carroll's Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and its sequel, Through the Looking Glass and What Alice Found There, tell the story of a young girl in a fantasy world filled with peculiar, anthropomorphic creatures. The classic tale of literary nonsense takes the reader on an exploration of logic and absurdities. The Alice books — sometimes combined or referred to with the abbreviated title Alice in Wonderland — have been translated into at least 97 languages with over a hundred different editions. The books have also been adapted numerous times into films (both live action and cartoon), plays, and musicals.


    The Wind In the Willows by Kenneth Grahame

    The Wind in the Willows is a classic of children's literature by Kenneth Grahame, first published in 1908. Alternately slow moving and fast paced, it focuses on four anthropomorphised animal characters in a pastoral version of England. The novel is notable for its mixture of mysticism, adventure, morality, and camaraderie. The Wind in the Willows was in its thirty-first printing when then-famous playwright, A. A. Milne, who loved it, adapted a part of it for stage as Toad of Toad Hall in 1929.


    A Child's Garden Of Verse by Robert Louis Stevenson

    Rediscover the delight and innocence of childhood in these classic poems from celebrated Scottish author, Robert Louis Stevenson.From make-believe to climbing trees, bedtime stories to morning play and favorite cousins to beloved mothers.Here is a very special collection to be treasured for ever.  First published in 1885, the first printing of A Child's Garden of Verses ran 1000 copies by Longhaus, Green and Co in London. This book was not illustrated until the 1896 edition, published 2 years after Stevenson's death. The collection contains about 65 poems, and many of the poems, including “The Land of Counterpane,” take a positive perspective on Stevenson's own childhood which was plagued by sickness. He dedicated the work to his nurse Alison Cunningham. Stevenson was a Scottish novelist, poet, essayist, musician and travel writer. (13 November 1850 – 3 December 1894) Although he died at just forty four years old and suffered from ill health the majority of his life he managed to travel and write extensively in that short period. His most famous works are Treasure Island , Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde , Kidnapped, and A Child's Garden of Verses . Although Stevenson fell out of the canon for a number of years, today he is one of the most translated authors and is highly celebrated for his stories.


    The Night Before Christmas by Clement C Moore

    "A Visit from St. Nicholas ", also known as " The Night Before Christmas" and "'Twas the Night Before Christmas " from its first line, is a poem first published anonymously in 1823 . This famous poem helped to cement the image of Santa Claus from the description of his appearance, his transportation, and how he brings the gifts to children on Christmas eve.


    Old Possum's Book Of Practical Cats by T S Eliot

    Eliot’s famous collection of nonsense verse about cats-the inspiration for the Andrew Lloyd Webber musical Cats. This edition features pen-and-ink drolleries by Edward Gorey throughout.


    Harry Potter and The Goblet Of Fire by J K Rowling

    Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire (Harry Potter, #4) keeps having horrible dreams that wake him with the scar on his forehead throbbing. He is relieved to return to the magical realm from his summer break early to attend the Quidditch World Cup with the Weasleys, but the relief quickly gives way to a dark threat that looms over the magical world. Being a teenager is hard enough without having a Dark Lord seeking your destruction! Hugo Award for Best Novel (2001) , Mythopoeic Fantasy Award for Adolescent Literature (2008) , Publieksprijs voor het Nederlandse Boek (2001) , Golden Archer Award for Middle/Junior High (2002) , Indian Paintbrush Book Award (2002)  


    Where the Sidewalk Ends by Shel Silverstein

    Where the Sidewalk Ends is a collection of children's poetry written and illustrated by Shel Silverstein. The book's poems address many common childhood concerns as well as purely fanciful stories that can easily entertain kids and adults alike. Where the Sidewalk Ends has been translated into more than 20 languages worldwide. The book received the New York Times’ Outstanding Book Award and was named an ALA Notable Book as well as one of the 100 Greatest Books for Kids by Parent & Child magazine. Note: Recited, sung and shouted by Shel Silverstein himself, the audio edition of Where the Sidewalk Ends was originally released on cassette in 1983 and won the 1984 Grammy Award for Best Recording For Children. 


    Hamlet by William Shakespeare

    In this quintessential Shakespearean drama, Hamlets halting pursuit of revenge for his fathers death unfolds in a series of highly charged confrontations that climax in tragedy.  Includes bibliographical references (p. [175]-178).


    The Invisible Man by H G Wells

    Invisible Man is a novel written by HG Wells, first published as a serial in  Pearson's Weekly  in 1897 before being published as a book by C. Arthur Pearson in 1897. The story follows the scientist Griffith, who through experimentation has become the Invisible Man of the title.  Griffith's initial, almost comedic, adventures are soon overshadowed by the bizarre streak of terror he unleashes upon the inhabitants of a small village, and the novel is noted for its horror, suspense and psychological nuance.


    Harry Potter and The Chamber Of Secrets by J K Rowling

    Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets (Harry Potter, #2) finds the hero of Hogwarts back to his humble home with the Dursleys for summer break.  Between their efforts, and that of a strange and much-abused house-elf, Harry feels like he might never make it back to complete his wizard training! Even back at Hogwarts, danger abounds!  A mysterious "Chamber of Secrets" has been opened, and the young wizard and his friends must use everything they can to save each other from certain doom! The truth lies behind a magical diary, a ghost who lives inside a toilet, a pompous new teacher and ends with the Dark Wizard Voldemort. Mythopoeic Fantasy Award for Adolescent Literature (2008) , British Book Award (1999) , Smarties Prize (1999) , Prijs van de Jonge Jury (2002) , Booklist 1999 Editor's choice (1999)


    Harry Potter and The Prisoner Of Azkaban by J K Rowling

    Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban (Harry Potter, #3) The adventures of Harry Potter and his friends continue in the third book in this world-acclaimed series. When Voldemort killed Harry Potter's parents, he didn't do it alone - he had help from his network of dark wizards.  For twelve years, the horrid prison Azkaban has held one of those wizards - an infamous man named Sirius Black. This man has now escaped - and is expected to be heading straight for Hogwarts and Harry Potter! Bram Stoker Award for Best Work for Young Readers (1999) , Locus Award for Best Fantasy Novel (2000) , Whitbread Award for Children's Literature , Mythopoeic Fantasy Award for Adolescent Literature (2008) , Smarties Prize (1999) ...more Smarties Prize (1999) , Costa Book Award (1999) , Books I Loved Best Yearly (BILBY) Awards for Older Readers (2005) , Colorado Blue Spruce Young Adult Book Award (2004) , Maine Student Book Award (2000) , Golden Archer Award for Intermediate (2001) , Indian Paintbrush Book Award (2004) , Soaring Eagle Book Award (2002)


    Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare

    Set during five of the most intensely dramatic days ever portrayed, ROMEO AND JULIET was probably written in 1594 or 1595, and first published in a 1597 edition, as transcribed by actors who had performed it. Other editions appeared later, but even the more authoritative versions, such as that of 1599--probably drawn from Shakespeare's own manuscript copies--lack the detailed stage directions present in the actors' transcription; thus, modern editions incorporate several sources. ROMEO AND JULIET is among the most oft performed of Shakespeare's works, and it has been among the most beloved since its earliest days on the stage. Though the title page of the 1597 edition declares that ROMEO AND JULIET had been performed and enjoyed many times prior to its publication, the first extant direct record of the events of a production refer to a 1662 staging, in which the play was probably adapted or altered--adaption was particularly popular in the 17th century. One London stage ran different conclusions on alternative nights; audiences who went home glum on Friday could be uplifted by the play's ending if they returned on Saturday night. The story of ROMEO AND JULIET was derived by Shakespeare from many sources. The version most contemporary to his own was the 1562 poem "The Tragicall History of Romeus and Iuliet" by Arthur Brooke, which itself was an adaptation of a French piece by Pierre Boaistuau, which Boaistuau had adapted from the Italian. Indeed, aspects of the tragic story have recurred throughout Western literature since at least the third century. Shakespeare greatly intensified the pace by compressing a piece which had unfolded over the course of several months into the space of five days--a period in which much transpires at daybreak, including the famous balcony scene where Romeo declares, "But soft, what light through yonder window breaks?/It is the east, and Juliet is the sun." Romeo is forced to approach Juliet in secret because of the impassioned rivalry between his family, the Montagues--and Juliet's, the Capulets. Despite the intensity of their family's mutual disdain, the young lovers strive to marry. However, fate intervenes to keep them apart, and, when the Montagues and Capulets discover the folly of their ways, it's too late for Romeo and Juliet.


    The Story Of Mankind by Hendrik Willem Van Loon

    The Story of Mankind was written and illustrated by American journalist, professor, and author Hendrik Willem van Loon and published in 1921. In 1922, it was the first book to be awarded the Newbery Medal for an outstanding contribution to children's literature.


    Green Eggs and Ham by Dr Seuss

    Green Eggs and Ham is a best-selling and critically acclaimed book by Dr. Seuss, first published in 1960. As of 2001, according to Publishers Weekly, it was the fourth-bestselling English-language children's book (novel) of all time.


    Harry Potter and The Order Of the Phoenix by J K Rowling

    Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix (Harry Potter, #5) shows us how the plot begins to thicken in this  renowned series.  The tale grows darker and becomes psychologically intense as the teenaged boy wizard much handle his social life as well as the dark forces that seek to take him down! The greater community begins to doubt Harry and the existence of Voldemort's return, and Hogwarts is overtaken by an oppressive representative from the Ministry of Magic.  We meet the dread Dementors, and Harry loses loved ones in this tale of his exhausting fifth year! Bram Stoker Award for Works for Young Readers (2003) , Anthony Award for Young Adult (2004) , Mythopoeic Fantasy Award for Adolescent Literature (2008) , Books I Loved Best Yearly (BILBY) Awards for Older Readers (2004) , Colorado Blue Spruce Young Adult Book Award (2006) ...more Colorado Blue Spruce Young Adult Book Award (2006) , Golden Archer Award for Middle/Junior High (2005) , ALA Teens' Top Ten (2004) , Carnegie Medal Nominee (2003)


    The Life Of Our Lord by Charles Dickens

    The Life of Our Lord: Written for His Children During the Years 1846 to 1849 by Charles Dickens was actually not intended to be a published work, and is simply a father explaining the life of Christ to his children, in his own words.


    The Little Grey Men by Bb

    The Little Grey Men is a children's storybook by Denys Watkins-Pitchford, writing under the pseudonym “BB”. It tells the exploits of four gnomes, named after the flowers Baldmoney, Sneezewort, Dodder and Cloudberry. The Little Grey Men won BB the 1942 Carnegie Medal in Literature. In 1975 The Little Grey Men was adapted into a 10 part animated series, called Baldmoney, Sneezewort, Dodder and Cloudberry, by Anglia Television in the U.K.


    A Midsummer Night's Dream by William Shakespeare

    "I feel that I have spent half my career with one or another Pelican Shakespeare in my back pocket. Convenience, however, is the least important aspect of the new Pelican Shakespeare series. Here is an elegant and clear text for either the study or the rehearsal room, notes where you need them and the distinguished scholarship of the general editors, Stephen Orgel and A. R. Braunmuller who understand that these are plays for performance as well as great texts for contemplation." (Patrick Stewart) The distinguished Pelican Shakespeare series, which has sold more than four million copies, is now completely revised and repackaged. Each volume features: * Authoritative, reliable texts * High quality introductions and notes * New, more readable trade trim size * An essay on the theatrical world of Shakespeare and essays on Shakespeare's life and the selection of texts


    The Wonderful Wizard Of Oz by L Frank Baum

    The Wonderful Wizard of Oz is a children's novel written by L. Frank Baum and illustrated by W.W. Denslow. It was originally published by the George M. Hill Company in Chicago on May 17, 1900, and has since been reprinted countless times, most often under the name The Wizard of Oz, which is the name of both the 1902 stage play and the extremely popular, highly acclaimed 1939 film version. The story chronicles the adventures of a girl named Dorothy Gale in the Land of Oz.


    The Night Before Christmas by Clement Clarke Moore



    The Book Of Cowboys by Holling C Holling



    Macbeth by William Shakespeare



    Doctor Dolittle's Circus by Hugh Lofting



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