British Fiction

From Alice's Adventures In Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass to Animal Farm, from Free Fall to Departmental Ditties, we can help you find the british fiction books you are looking for. As the world's largest independent marketplace for new, used and rare books, you always get the best in service and value when you buy from Biblio.com, and all of your purchases are backed by our return guarantee.

Top Sellers in British Fiction

Alice's Adventures In Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass

Alice's Adventures In Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass

by Lewis Carroll

Lewis Carroll's Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and its sequel, Through
the Looking Glass and What Alice Found There, tell the story of a young
girl in a fantasy world filled with peculiar, anthropomorphic
creatures. The classic tale of literary nonsense takes the reader on an
exploration of logic and absurdities. The Alice books — sometimes
combined or referred to with the abbreviated title Alice in Wonderland —
have been translated into at least 97 languages with over a hundred
different... Read more
Wuthering Heights

Wuthering Heights

by Emily Bronte

Wuthering Heights is Emily Brontë's only novel. It was first published in 1847 under the pseudonym Ellis Bell, and a posthumous second edition was edited by her sister Charlotte. The name of the novel comes from the Yorkshire manor on the moors on which the story centers (as an adjective, Wuthering is a Yorkshire word referring to turbulent weather).
Treasure Island

Treasure Island

by Robert Louis Stevenson

Treasure Island is an adventure novel by Robert Louis Stevenson. The story was originally serialised in the children's magazine Young Folks under the title The Sea Cook over a period of several months from 1881-82.Traditionally considered a coming-of-age story, Treasure Island is the classic pirate tale, known for its superb atmosphere, character and action. It is one of the most frequently dramatised of all novels. The influence of Treasure Island on popular perception of... Read more
Nineteen Eighty-Four

Nineteen Eighty-Four

by George Orwell

Nineteen Eighty-Four (1984) by George
Orwell has become the definitive dystopian novel of the twentieth
century. Originally published on June 8, 1949 by Secker and
Warburg in the United Kingdom, the book follows the main character,
Winston Smith, through his disillusionment with totalitarianism and a
doomed struggle of resistance. George Orwell is a pen-name, Orwell's
real name was Eric Blair. -
Rebecca

Rebecca

by Daphne Du Maurier

An orphaned young woman working as a maid is swept off her feet by a wealthy widowed Englishman, and quickly married him. But when she arrives at his estate she learns she pales in comparison with his seemingly perfect deceased first wife Rebecca, especially in the eyes of the sinister housekeeper Mrs. Danvers. When Rebecca’s body is found on her shipwrecked boat the dark secrets held by the husband are discovered as well. Rebecca has had many adaptations in film, radio, and television,... Read more
You Only Live Twice

You Only Live Twice

by Ian Fleming

Bond, a shattered man after the death of his wife at the hands of Ernst Stavro Blofeld, has gone to pieces as an agent, endangering himself and his fellow operatives. M, unwilling to accept the loss of one of his best men, sends 007 to Japan for one last, near-impossible mission. But Japan proves to be Bond's downfall, leading him to a mysterious residence known as the 'Castle of Death' where he encounters an old enemy revitalized. All the omens suggest that this is the end for the British agent and, for... Read more
Gulliver's Travels

Gulliver's Travels

by Jonathan Swift

Gulliver's Travels (1726, amended 1735), officially Travels into Several Remote Nations of the World, in Four Parts. By Lemuel Gulliver, First a Surgeon, and then a Captain of several Ships, is a novel by Irish writer and clergyman Jonathan Swift that is both a satire on human nature and a parody of the "travellers' tales" literary sub-genre. It is Swift's best known full-length work, and a classic of English literature. The book became tremendously popular as soon as it was published.
Harry Potter and The Prisoner Of Azkaban

Harry Potter and The Prisoner Of Azkaban

by J K Rowling

Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban (Harry Potter, #3)
The adventures of Harry Potter and his friends continue in the third book in this world-acclaimed series.
When Voldemort killed Harry Potter's parents, he didn't do it alone - he had help from his network of dark wizards.  For twelve years, the horrid prison Azkaban has held one of those wizards - an infamous man named Sirius Black.
This man has now escaped - and is expected to be heading straight for Hogwarts and Harry Potter!
Bram Stoker... Read more
Bleak House

Bleak House

by Charles Dickens

Bleak House is the ninth novel by Charles Dickens, published in twenty monthly installments between March 1852 and September 1853. It is held to be one of Dickens's finest novels, containing one of the most vast, complex and engaging arrays of minor characters and sub-plots in his entire canon. The story is told partly by the novel's heroine, Esther Summerson, and partly by omniscient narrator.
The Spy Who Loved Me

The Spy Who Loved Me

by Ian Fleming

‘He was about six feet tall, slim and fit. The eyes in the lean , slightly tanned face were a very clear grey-blue and as they observed the men they were cold and watchful. His good looks had a dangerous, almost cruel quality that had frightened me. But now I knew he could smile, I thought his face exciting, in a way no face had ever excited me before …’ Vivienne Michel is in trouble. Trying to escape her tangled past, she has run away to the American backwoods, winding up at the... Read more
Silas Marner

Silas Marner

by George Eliot

Silas Marner: The Weaver of Raveloe is a dramatic novel by George Eliot (the pen name of Mary Ann Evans) which was first published in 1861.
The Time Machine

The Time Machine

by H G Wells

The Time Machine is a science fiction novel by H. G. Wells, first published in 1895 and later directly adapted into at least two feature films of the same name, as well as two television versions, and a large number of comic book adaptations. It indirectly inspired many more works of fiction in all media. This 32,000 word novella is generally credited with the popularization of the concept of time travel using a vehicle that allows an operator to travel purposefully and selectively.
Sonnets From the Portuguese

Sonnets From the Portuguese

by Elizabeth Barrett Browning

Elizabeth Barrett Browning's Sonnets to
the Portuguese are widely considered among the greatest cycle of
sonnets in the English language. This collection of love poems was
written between 1845-46 to fellow poet and her soon-to-be husband,
Robert Browning.


Originally, Browning had no intention
of publishing the poetry owing to its deeply personal subject matter,
but her husband convinced her to publish them in the 1850 edition of
her Poems. Originally, however, she was reportedly to have called the... Read more
Our Mutual Friend

Our Mutual Friend

by Charles Dickens

Our Mutual Friend (written in the years 1864–65) is the last novel completed by Charles Dickens and is in many ways one of his most sophisticated works, combining deep psychological insight with rich social analysis. At one level it centres on, in the words of critic J. Hillis Miller, "money, money, money, and what money can make of life" but in a deeper sense it also about 'human values'.
Of Human Bondage

Of Human Bondage

by W Somerset Maugham

Of Human Bondage is a novel by W. Somerset Maugham. It is generally agreed to be his masterpiece and to be strongly autobiographical in nature, although Maugham stated, "This is a novel, not an autobiography, though much in it is autobiographical, more is pure invention. " Maugham, who had originally planned to call his novel Beauty from Ashes, finally settled on a title taken from Spinoza's Ethics
The Way Of All Flesh

The Way Of All Flesh

by Samuel Butler

The Way of All Flesh by Samuel Butler is a
semi-autobiographical novel that attacks Victorian-era hypocrisy. The story
traces the history of the Pontifex family from the early eighteenth century
until about 1880 and focuses, for the most part, on the life of young Ernest
Pontifex, the novel’s protagonist. Yet Ernest isn’t born until 1835, in the
book’s 17th chapter. Butler uses the first 16 chapters to provide a
psychological portrait of the Pontifex family background as a means of allowing
readers... Read more
A Room Of One's Own

A Room Of One's Own

by Virginia Woolf

A Room of One's Own was first published in October 1929 in the UK and USA alike as a limited edition run of 492 numbered, signed copies. The first English edition and impression was released three days later with the Vanessa Bell dust jacket, published by Hogarth Press, the Woolfs' own publishing house. The first US edition was published by Harcourt Brace & Co.
The Posthumous Papers Of the Pickwick Club

The Posthumous Papers Of the Pickwick Club

by Charles Dickens

The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club (commonly known as The Pickwick Papers) is the first novel by Charles Dickens. After the publication, the widow of the illustrator Robert Seymour claimed that the idea for the novel was originally her husband's; however, in his preface to the 1867 edition, Dickens strenuously denied any specific input, writing that "Mr Seymour never originated or suggested an incident, a phrase, or a word, to be found in the book.
Hamlet

Hamlet

by William Shakespeare

In this quintessential Shakespearean drama, Hamlets halting pursuit of revenge for his fathers death unfolds in a series of highly charged confrontations that climax in tragedy.  Includes bibliographical references (p. [175]-178).
Old Curiosity Shop

Old Curiosity Shop

by Charles Dickens

The Old Curiosity Shop, what would become Charles Dickens’
fourth novel, was first published in 88 weekly installments in Dickens’ serial,
Master Humphrey’s Clock, from April 1840 to February 1841. In a tale that
survives the transcendence of time, The Old Curiosity Shop tells the story of
thirteen-year-old Nell Trent and her grandfather who live in The Old Curiosity
Shop, a small antique and gift store. The unnamed grandfather, desperate to
leave Nell in good financial standing after his death,... Read more
Sons and Lovers

Sons and Lovers

by D H Lawrence

Though it is the author’s third novel, Sons and Lovers is
often regarded as D.H. Lawrence’s masterpiece. The autobiographical work, which
was originally titled Paul Morel after its protagonist, was set in motion with
the death of Lawrence’s mother, Lydia. The author used the opportunity to
reexamine his childhood, his relationship with his mother, and her
psychological effect on his sexuality.

Sons and Lovers had already been rejected by one publisher
when Lawrence sent the manuscript to Edward... Read more
The Alexandria Quartet

The Alexandria Quartet

by Lawrence Durrell

The Alexandria Quartet is a tetralogy of novels by British writer Lawrence Durrell, published between 1957 and 1960. A critical and commercial success, the books present four perspectives on a single set of events and characters in Alexandria, Egypt, before and during World War II. As Durrell explains in his preface to Balthazar, the four novels are an exploration of relativity and the notions of continuum and subject-object relation, with modern love as the subject.
No cover image available

Animal Farm

by George Orwell

Animal Farm is a dystopian novella by George Orwell. Published in England on 17 August 1945, the book reflects events leading up to and during the Stalin era before World War II. Orwell, a democratic socialist and a member of the Independent Labour Party for many years, was a critic of Joseph Stalin and was suspicious of Moscow-directed Stalinism after his experiences with the NKVD during the Spanish Civil War.

British Fiction Books & Ephemera

Free Fall

Free Fall

by Golding, William

"I was standing up, pressed back against the wall, trying not to breathe. I got there in the one movement my body made. My body had many hairs on legs and belly and chest and head, and each had its own life; each inherited a hundred thousand years of loathing and fear for things that scuttle or slide or crawl." from Free FallSammy Mountjoy, artist, rises from poverty and an obscure birth to see his pictures hung in the Tate Gallery. Swept into World War II, he is taken as a prisoner-of-war, threatened... Read more
Men Like Gods

Men Like Gods

by Wells, H G

Men Like Gods is a novel written in 1923 by H. G. Wells. It features a utopian parallel universe.
Mr Noon

Mr Noon

by Lawrence, D H

The son of a miner, the prolific novelist, poet, and travel writer David Herbert Lawrence was born in Eastwood, Nottinghamshire, in 1885. He attended Nottingham University and found employment as a schoolteacher. His first novel, The White Peacock, was published in 1911, the same year his beloved mother died and he quit teaching after contracting pneumonia. The next year Lawrence published Sons and Lovers and ran off to Germany with Frieda Weekley, his former tutor’s wife. His masterpieces The... Read more
Puck Of Pook\'s Hill

Puck Of Pook's Hill

by Kipling, Rudyard

The children were at the Theatre, acting to Three Cows as much as they could remember of Midsummer Night's Dream. Their father had made them a small play out of the big Shakespeare one, and they had rehearsed it with him and with their mother till they could say it by heart. They began when Nick Bottom the weaver comes out of the bushes with a donkey's head on his shoulders, and finds Titania, Queen of the Fairies, asleep.
Rob Roy

Rob Roy

by Scott, Sir Walter

Young Frank Osbaldistone, sent to live in Scotland, is drawn to the powerful figure of Rob Roy MacGregor, who, with his wife, fights for justice and dignity for Scotland. Twists of plot and a romantic outlaw's cunning escapes make this a classic epic.
The Castle Of Otranto

The Castle Of Otranto

by Walpole, Horace

The Castle of Otranto is a 1764 novel by Horace Walpole. It is generally regarded as the first gothic novel, initiating a literary genre which would become extremely popular in the later 18th century and early 19th century. Thus, Castle, and Walpole by extension is arguably the forerunner to such authors as Charles Robert Maturin, Ann Radcliffe, Bram Stoker, Edgar Allan Poe and Daphne du Maurier.
The Life and Adventures Of Nicholas Nickleby

The Life and Adventures Of Nicholas Nickleby

by Dickens, Charles

Nicholas Nickleby is left responsible for his mother and sister when his father dies. The novel follows his attempt to succeed in supporting them, despite his uncle Ralph's antagonistic lack of belief in him. It is one of Dickens' early comic novels.
The Vicar Of Wakefield

The Vicar Of Wakefield

by Goldsmith, Oliver

"The greatest object in the universe, says a certain philosopher, is a good man struggling with adversity." When Dr Primrose loses his fortune in a disastrous investment, his idyllic life in the country is shattered and he is forced to move with his wife and six children to an impoverished living on the estate of Squire Thornhill. Taking to the road in pursuit of his daughter, who has been seduced by the rakish Squire, the beleaguered Primrose becomes embroiled in a series of misadventures –... Read more
The Persimmon Tree

The Persimmon Tree

by Courtenay, Bryce

Departmental Ditties

Departmental Ditties

by Kipling, Rudyard