Charles Dickens

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A Christmas Carol

A Christmas Carol

by Charles Dickens

The full title of Charles Dickens' most famous work is technically A Christmas Carol in Prose, Being a Ghost-Story of Christmas. This novella was published on December 19, 1843, and the first edition run of 6000 copies were sold out by Christmas Eve of that year. The publication of the first edition was fraught with complications, and even though the book was received to positive reviews, profits of the book fell far below Dickens' expectations, and the financial strain caused rifts between Dickens and... Read more
A Tale Of Two Cities

A Tale Of Two Cities

by Charles Dickens

A Tale of Two Cities is a novel by Charles Dickens, set in London and Paris before and during the French Revolution. With 200 million copies sold, it is the most printed original English book, the most printed and among the most famous works of fiction.
Great Expectations

Great Expectations

by Charles Dickens

Great Expectations is a novel by Charles Dickens first serialised in All the Year Round from 1 December 1860 to August 1861. It is regarded as one of his greatest and most sophisticated novels, and is one of his most enduringly popular novels; having been adapted for stage and screen over 250 times.
David Copperfield

David Copperfield

by Charles Dickens

"The most perfect of all the Dickens novels' Virginia WoolfWhen David Copperfield escapes from the cruelty of his childhood home, he embarks on a journey to adulthood which will lead him through comedy and tragedy, love and heartbreak and friendship and betrayal. Over the course of his adventures, David meets an array of eccentric characters and learns hard lessons about the world before he finally discovers true happiness.
Bleak House

Bleak House

by Charles Dickens

Bleak House is the ninth novel by Charles Dickens, published in twenty monthly installments between March 1852 and September 1853. It is held to be one of Dickens's finest novels, containing one of the most vast, complex and engaging arrays of minor characters and sub-plots in his entire canon. The story is told partly by the novel's heroine, Esther Summerson, and partly by omniscient narrator.
Oliver Twist

Oliver Twist

by Charles Dickens

Oliver Twist, published in 1838, became one of English writer Charles Dickens's better-known stories and was the first Victorian novel with a child protagonist. Oliver Twist (Parish Boy's Progress) focuses on orphan Oliver Twist, born in a workhouse and sold into an apprenticeship with an undertaker. After escaping, Oliver travels to London, where he meets the "Artful Dodger", a member of a gang of juvenile pickpockets led by an elderly criminal Fagin. The book shows an unromantic... Read more
Our Mutual Friend

Our Mutual Friend

by Charles Dickens

Our Mutual Friend (written in the years 1864–65) is the last novel completed by Charles Dickens and is in many ways one of his most sophisticated works, combining deep psychological insight with rich social analysis. At one level it centres on, in the words of critic J. Hillis Miller, "money, money, money, and what money can make of life" but in a deeper sense it's also about 'human values'.
The Posthumous Papers Of the Pickwick Club

The Posthumous Papers Of the Pickwick Club

by Charles Dickens

The Posthumous Papers Of The Pickwick Club catapulted the 24-year-old author to immediate fame. Readers were captivated by the adventures of the poet Snodgrass, the lover Tupman, the sportsman Winkle &, above all, by that quintessentially English Quixote, Mr Pickwick, & his cockney Sancho Panza, Sam Weller. From the hallowed turf of Dingley Dell Cricket Club to the unholy fracas of the Eatanswill election, via the Fleet debtor’s prison, characters & incidents sprang to life from Dickens’s... Read more
Little Dorrit

Little Dorrit

by Charles Dickens

Little Dorrit is a serial novel by Charles Dickens published originally between 1855 and 1857. It is a work of satire on the shortcomings of the government and society of the period. Much of Dickens' ire is focused upon the institutions of debtors' prisons & mdash; in which people who owed money were imprisoned, unable to work, until they repaid their debts. The representative prison in this case is the Marshalsea where the author's own father had been imprisoned.
The Pickwick Papers

The Pickwick Papers

by Charles Dickens

The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club (commonly known as The Pickwick Papers) is the first novel by Charles Dickens. After the publication the widow of illustrator Robert Seymour claimed that the idea for the novel was originally her husband's; however, in his preface to the 1867 edition, Dickens strenuously denied any specific input, writing that "Mr Seymour never originated or suggested an incident, a phrase, or a word, to be found in the book.
Dombey and Son

Dombey and Son

by Charles Dickens

Charles Dickens’s story of a powerful man whose callous neglect of his family triggers his professional and personal downfall, showcases the author’s gift for vivid characterization and unfailingly realistic description. It follows the narrative of a shipping firm owner, who abandoned his family in favor of fortune after rejecting his daughter’s love in preference of a son. He later reconciles with her and begs forgiveness before his death. Dombey and Son is a novel by the Victorian author... Read more
The Life & Adventures Of Martin Chuzzlewit

The Life & Adventures Of Martin Chuzzlewit

by Charles Dickens

The greed of his family has led wealthy old Martin Chuzzlewit to become suspicious and misanthropic, leaving his grandson and namesake to make his own way in the world. And so young Martin sets out from the Wiltshire home of his supposed champion, the scheming architect Pecksniff, to seek his fortune in America. In depicting Martin's journey – an experience that teaches him to question his inherited self-interest and egotism – Dickens created many vividly realized figures: the brutish lout Jonas... Read more
The Life and Adventures Of Nicholas Nickleby

The Life and Adventures Of Nicholas Nickleby

by Charles Dickens

Nicholas Nickleby is left responsible for his mother and sister when his father dies. The novel follows his attempt to succeed in supporting them, despite his uncle Ralph's antagonistic lack of belief in him. It is one of Dickens' early comic novels.
The Adventures Of Oliver Twist

The Adventures Of Oliver Twist

by Charles Dickens

The Adventures of Oliver Twist is the second novel by
English author Charles Dickens. The book was initially published serially from
February 1837 through April 1839 in Bentley’s Miscellany, a periodical edited
by Dickens. In the classic rags-to-riches story, the orphan and escapee Oliver
Twist must find his way through the criminal-filled streets of London. 
The Mystery Of Edwin Drood

The Mystery Of Edwin Drood

by Charles Dickens

The Mystery of Edwin Drood marked the last of Charles Dickens novels, and was left unfinished in its publication. It follows the story of an orphan, Edwin Drood who worked as an engineer for his adoptive father’s firm, and his betrothal to fellow orphan Rosa Bud. As they come to age there is recognition that their love has been replaced by friendship, and the engagement is soon broken off. Shortly afterwards, in the middle of a storm on Christmas Eve, Edwin disappears, leaving nothing behind but some... Read more
A Child's History Of England

A Child's History Of England

by Charles Dickens

IF you look at a Map of the World, you will see, in the left-hand upper corner of the Eastern Hemisphere, two Islands lying in the sea. They are England and Scotland, and Ireland. England and Scotland form the greater part of these Islands. Ireland is the next in size. The little neighbouring islands, which are so small upon the Map as to be mere dots, are chiefly little bits of Scotland, - broken off, I dare say, in the course of a great length of time, by the power of the restless water.
The Life Of Our Lord

The Life Of Our Lord

by Charles Dickens

The Life of Our Lord: Written for His Children During the Years 1846 to 1849 by Charles Dickens was actually not intended to be a published work, and is simply a father explaining the life of Christ to his children, in his own words.

Barnaby Rudge

Barnaby Rudge

by Charles Dickens

Barnaby Rudge: A Tale of the Riots of Eighty, commonly known as Barnaby Rudge, is an historical novel by the author Charles Dickens. Barnaby Rudge was one of two novels that Dickens published in his short-lived weekly serial Master Humphrey's Clock, which lasted from 1840 to 1841, when the book was published. It was Dickens' first attempt at an historical novel, his only other being A Tale of Two Cities.
Hard Times

Hard Times

by Charles Dickens

Hard Times - For These Times (commonly known as Hard Times) is the tenth novel by Charles Dickens, first published in 1854. The book is a condition-of-England novel, aimed at highlighting the social and economic pressures of the times.
Sketches By Boz

Sketches By Boz

by Charles Dickens

Sketches by Boz collected a rich and strange mixture of reportage, observation, fancy and fiction centred on the metropolis. It was Dickens's first book, published when he was twenty-four, and in it we find him walking the London streets, in theatres, pawnshops, law-courts, prisons, along the Thames, and on the omnibus, missing nothing, recording and transforming urban and suburban life into new terrain for literature. Sketches is a remarkable achievement, and looks towards Dickens's giant novels in... Read more
American Notes

American Notes

by Charles Dickens

American Notes for General Circulation is a travelogue by Charles Dickens detailing his trip to North America from January to June, 1842. While there he acted as a critical observer of these societies almost as if returning a status report on their progress. This can be compared to the style of his Pictures from Italy written four years later, where he wrote far more like a tourist. His American journey was also an inspiration for his novel Martin Chuzzlewit.
The Cricket On the Hearth

The Cricket On the Hearth

by Charles Dickens

Charles Dickens Books & Ephemera

American Notes For General Circulation

American Notes For General Circulation

by Dickens, Charles

Miscellaneous papers from "The Morning Chronicle", "The Daily News", "The Examiner", "Household Words", "All the Year Round", etc. and Plays and poems.
Dickens

Dickens

by Dickens, Charles

Charles Dickens

Charles Dickens

by Gissing, George