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Ernest Hemingway

From The Old Man and The Sea to Hemingway, from Ernest Hemingway, Selected Letters, 1917-1961 to A Reader's Guide To Ernest Hemingway, we can help you find the ernest hemingway books you are looking for. As the world's largest independent marketplace for new, used and rare books, you always get the best in service and value when you buy from Biblio.com, and all of your purchases are backed by our return guarantee.


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    The Old Man and The Sea by Ernest Hemingway

    The Old Man and the Sea is a novella by Ernest Hemingway, written in Cuba in 1951 and published in 1952. It was the last major work of fiction to be produced by Hemingway and published in his lifetime. One of his most famous works, it centers upon Santiago, an aging Cuban fisherman who struggles with a giant marlin far out in the Gulf Stream.


    For Whom the Bell Tolls by Ernest Hemingway

    Many consider  For Whom the Bell Tolls  to be author Ernest Hemingway’s finest work. Inspired by Hemingway’s time as a war correspondent for The North American Newspaper Alliance during the Spanish Civil War,  For Whom the Bell Tolls  is a stark and brutal commentary on the nature of war, sacrifice, and death. In fact, many believe his work is among the best depictions of the Spanish Civil War written. As with some of Hemingway’s other work, many of the characters, experiences, and events were based off real people and battles Hemingway saw.  One of the most interesting qualities of  For Whom the Bell Tolls  is the use and restraint of profanity. Even though Hemingway had already written much about war and tribulations and had never seemed inclined to limit the use of vulgar language, For Whom the Bell Tolls is a clear exemption. When writing dialogue, Hemingway would insert the word “obscenity” instead of writing the exact word or phrase. There has been a lot of discussion about the reason for such omissions, and while some believe Hemingway was worried about the book being banned and thus wanted to make the book as reader-friendly as possible for a brutally violent war novel, others believe the omissions of profanity was due to transliteration problems and the author’s attempt to be as honest to the dialogue he heard as possible.  There is no arguing with the legacy and influence Hemingway had not only on American culture, but also on generations of future writers. The Beatnik generation referred to Hemingway as “Papa” with a quite reverence, and Hemingway inspired countless journalists with his in-depth profiles and wartime articles. Even the cities where he wrote his books are now places for pilgrimage among his most devoted fans. Hemingway first started writing  For Whom the Bell Tolls  in Cuba and later finished it in Sun Valley, Idaho. In fact, both hotel rooms are now popular tourist destinations.


    A Farewell To Arms by Ernest Hemingway

    Set during World War 1, Ernest Hemingway’s A Farewell to Arms is the story of Lieutenant Frederic Henry, an American serving as an ambulance driver in the Italian army, and his love affair with an English nurse named Catherine Barkley. The novel is semi-autobiographical, based on Hemingway's own experiences serving in the Italian campaigns during the war. While some assume the title of the work to be taken from a poem by 16th century English dramatist George Peele, others believe it to be a simple pun of the word “arms.” A Farewell to Arms was first serialized in the May-October issues Scribner's Magazine 1929. It was published in book form in September of that year. As the work became available to the public just over ten years after the November 1918 armistice, Hemingway assumed his audience would recognize many of the references. In fact, certain basic information isn't alluded to in the book at all, as it was common knowledge around the time of publication. The result of this immediacy? Arguably one of the best novels written about World War I… ever. A Farewell to Arms was Hemingway's first bestseller, affording him financial independence and cementing his stature as a modern American writer. More specifically, the novel and its content helped to established the author as a key member of the “Lost Generation,” a subset of Modernist artists namely defined by their post-war disillusionment. A Farewell to Arms is ranked 74th on Modern Library’s “100 Best” English-language novels of the 20th century. 


    Sun Also Rises by Ernest Hemingway

    Based on real events and acquaintances of Hemingway, Sun Also Rises is about American and English expats in Pamplona.


    A Moveable Feast by Ernest Hemingway

    A Moveable Feast is a set of memoirs by American author Ernest Hemingway about his years in Paris as part of the American expatriate circle of writers in the 1920s. In addition to painting a picture of Hemingway's time as a struggling young writer, the book also sketches the story of Hemingway and his first wife, Hadley. A Moveable Feast is considered by many to contain some of his best writing.


    Green Hills Of Africa by Ernest Hemingway

    Green Hills of Africa is a 1935 work of nonfiction written by Ernest Hemingway. Hemingway's second work of nonfiction, Green Hills of Africa is basically a journal of a month on safari he and his wife, Pauline Marie Pfeiffer, took in East Africa during December 1933. Green Hills of Africa is divided into four parts: Pursuit and Conversation, Pursuit Remembered, Pursuit and Failure, and Pursuit as Happiness, each of which plays a different role in the story.


    Islands In the Stream by Ernest Hemingway

    Islands in the Stream was published in 1970, nine years after Hemingway's death. Thomas Hudon is an painter and adventurer in the 1930s, and this tale documents his voyages from Bimini to antisubmarine action in Cuba and beyond.


    To Have and Have Not by Ernest Hemingway

    To Have and Have Not is a 1937 novel by Ernest Hemingway about Harry Morgan, a fishing boat captain who runs contraband between Cuba and Florida. The novel depicts Harry as an essentially good man who is forced into blackmarket activity by economic forces beyond his control. Initially, his fishing charter Johnson tricks Harry by not paying back the money he owes him, and then escapes the country by airplane before Harry can realize what is going on.


    Across the River and Into the Trees by Ernest Hemingway

    Across the River and Into the Trees is a novel by Ernest Hemingway. The title is derived from the last words of Confederate General Thomas J. (Stonewall) Jackson.


    The Garden Of Eden by Ernest Hemingway

    Hemingway reveals a more tender side of his psyche with The Garden of Eden , which was published posthumously. David is a writer in the 1920's. He and his newly married wife, Catherine, spend their honeymoon in the Mediterranean. While they are there, they fall in love with a young woman, and begin to explore a deeper side of themselves. Can they navigate their own dark waters enough to hold a triad together?


    Men Without Women by Ernest Hemingway

    First published in 1927, Men Without Women is an early Hemingway collection containing fourteen short stories that are beginning to show the normal Hemingway themes: war and it's casualties, the interactions between men and women, sports, and violence. "Banal Story," "In Another Country," "The Killers," "Ten Indians," "Hills Like White Elephants," "The Undefeated," "Fifty Grand," "In Another Country," "Now I Lay Me," "A Canary for One," and more.


    Winner Take Nothing by Ernest Hemingway

    Winner Take Nothing is a 1933 collection of short stories by Ernest Hemingway. Hemingway's third collection of short stories, it was published four years after his most recent novel, A Farewell to Arms (1929), and a year after the non-fiction book about bullfighting, Death in the Afternoon (1932).


    Death In the Afternoon by Ernest Hemingway

    Death in the Afternoon is a non-fiction book by Ernest Hemingway about the ceremony and traditions of Spanish bullfighting. It was originally published in 1932. The book provides a look at the history and magnificence of bullfighting, while also being a deeper contemplation on the nature of fear and courage. Any discussion concerning bullfighting would be incomplete without some mention of the controversy surrounding it.


    The Dangerous Summer by Ernest Hemingway

    The Dangerous Summer is Ernest Hemingway's firsthand chronicle of a brutal season of bullfights in 1959 .


    In Our Time by Ernest Hemingway

    In Our Time is the first published collection of Hemingway's short fiction.  The book collects several of the author's short stories about American life in the early 1920's, just after WWI. A few of these stories focus on the character Nick Adams. First published in Paris in 1924 by Three Mountains Press under the title in our time - in all lower case - the first state of this work was a set of 18 vignettes and numbered 32 pages in total.  Only 300 copies were printed, but due to a printing mistake, only 170 copies were released for sale. Each copy is numbered and bears the statement of limitation that reads "of 170 copies printed rives hand-made paper this is number".  The first American publication was in 1925 by Boni & Liveright.  Although this is recognized as the next edition of the same work, it bears substantial differences.  Twelve short stories have been added.  Sixteen of the eighteen vignettes have been used as short pieces interspersed between the short stories.  Two of the original vignettes have been rewritten as the short stories "The Revolutionist" and "A Very Short Story" and the work numbers 136 pages. Hemingway regretted the lowercased title and published this version as In Our Time .


    True At First Light by Ernest Hemingway

    Both revealing self-portrait and dramatic fictional chronicle of his final African safari, Ernest Hemingway's last unpublished work was written when he returned from Kenya in 1953. Edited by his son Patrick, who accompanied his father on the safari, True at First Light offers rare insights into the legendary American writer. The book opens on the day his close friend Pop, a celebrated hunter, leaves Ernest in charge of the safari camp and news arrives of a potential attack from a hostile tribe. Drama continues to build as his wife, Mary, pursues the great black-maned lion that has become her obsession and Ernest becomes involved with a young African girl whom he supposedly plans to take as a second bride. Increasingly enchanted by the local African community, he struggles between the attraction of these two women and the wildly different cultures they represent. Spicing his depictions of human longings with sharp humor, Hemingway captures the excitement of big-game hunting and the unparallel beauty of the landscape. Rich in laughter, beauty and profound insight. True at First Light is an extraordinary publishing event -- a breathtaking final work from one of our most beloved and important writers.


    The Nick Adams Stories by Ernest Hemingway

    The Nick Adams Stories is a volume of short stories written by Ernest Hemingway. Hemingway's short stories which featured the character Nick Adams were compiled in one volume and republished posthumously in 1972. The Nick Adams Stories includes 24 stories and sketches, 8 of which were previously unpublished. Some of Hemingway's earliest work such as "Indian Camp" is represented, as well as some of his best known stories such as "Big Two-Hearted River".


    Ernest Hemingway by Carlos Baker



    The Hemingway Reader by Ernest Hemingway



    True At First Light by Ernest; Hemingway, Patrick Hemingway



    Ernest Hemingway by Carlos; Ernest Hemingway Baker



    Papa Hemingway by A E Hotchner



    Hemingway by James R Mellow



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