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Military Fiction

From Gone With the Wind to Death and Honor, from The Mauritius Command to Legion Of the Damned, we can help you find the military fiction books you are looking for. As the world's largest independent marketplace for new, used and rare books, you always get the best in service and value when you buy from Biblio.com, and all of your purchases are backed by our return guarantee.


Top Sellers in Military Fiction

    Gone With the Wind by Margaret Mitchell

    Margaret Mitchell only published one complete novel, but it was quite the book - Gone With the Wind earned her the Pulitzer Prize in 1937 and National Book Award for 1936. The epic romance tale set in and around Atlanta, Georgia during the American Civil War has remained a bestseller, even before the equally popular film starring Clark Gable and Vivian Leigh was made in 1939.


    For Whom the Bell Tolls by Ernest Hemingway

    Many consider  For Whom the Bell Tolls  to be author Ernest Hemingway’s finest work. Inspired by Hemingway’s time as a war correspondent for The North American Newspaper Alliance during the Spanish Civil War,  For Whom the Bell Tolls  is a stark and brutal commentary on the nature of war, sacrifice, and death. In fact, many believe his work is among the best depictions of the Spanish Civil War written. As with some of Hemingway’s other work, many of the characters, experiences, and events were based off real people and battles Hemingway saw.  One of the most interesting qualities of  For Whom the Bell Tolls  is the use and restraint of profanity. Even though Hemingway had already written much about war and tribulations and had never seemed inclined to limit the use of vulgar language, For Whom the Bell Tolls is a clear exemption. When writing dialogue, Hemingway would insert the word “obscenity” instead of writing the exact word or phrase. There has been a lot of discussion about the reason for such omissions, and while some believe Hemingway was worried about the book being banned and thus wanted to make the book as reader-friendly as possible for a brutally violent war novel, others believe the omissions of profanity was due to transliteration problems and the author’s attempt to be as honest to the dialogue he heard as possible.  There is no arguing with the legacy and influence Hemingway had not only on American culture, but also on generations of future writers. The Beatnik generation referred to Hemingway as “Papa” with a quite reverence, and Hemingway inspired countless journalists with his in-depth profiles and wartime articles. Even the cities where he wrote his books are now places for pilgrimage among his most devoted fans. Hemingway first started writing  For Whom the Bell Tolls  in Cuba and later finished it in Sun Valley, Idaho. In fact, both hotel rooms are now popular tourist destinations.


    All Quiet On the Western Front by Erich Maria Remarque

    YOTAM OTTOLENGHI owns an eponymous group of four restaurants, plus the high-end restaurant, NOPI, in London. His previous cookbooks-- Plenty, Jerusalem, and Ottolenghi --have all been on the New York Times bestseller list. Yotam writes for The Guardian and appears on BBC. He lives in London. The author lives in London, UK.


    Catch-22 by Joseph Heller

    Catch-22 is Joseph Heller’s first novel and his most acclaimed work. Set during World War II, the novel uses a distinctive non-chronological third-person omniscient narration, mainly focusing on the life of Captain John Yossarian, a U.S. Army Air Forces B-25 bombardier. Occasionally, the narrator also shows us how other characters, such as the chaplain or Hungry Joe, experience the world around them. As the novel’s events are described from the different points of view through separate out-of-sequence storylines, the timeline of Catch-22 develops along with the plot. The novel's title refers to a plot device that is repeatedly invoked in the story. Catch-22 starts as a set of paradoxical requirements whereby airmen mentally unfit to fly did not have to, but could not actually be excused. By the end of the novel, the phrase is invoked as the explanation for many unreasonable restrictions. “Catch-22” has since entered the English language and can be understood as an unsolvable logic puzzle, a difficult situation from which there is no escape. Upon publication, the book was not a best seller in the United States. It was merely a cult favorite until the publication of the paperback edition in 1962, which set record sales — most likely benefitting from a national debate about the pointlessness of the Vietnam War. Catch-22 has since been ranked as one of the 100 best English-language novels of the 20th century by the Modern Library, one of the 20th century's top 100 novels by the Radcliffe Publishing Course, and one of the 100 greatest novels of all time by The Observer. 


    The Hunt For Red October by Tom Clancy

    The Hunt for Red October is a novel by Tom Clancy. The story follows the intertwined adventures of Soviet submarine captain Marko Aleksandrovich Ramius and CIA analyst Jack (John) Patrick Ryan. The novel was originally published by the U.S. Naval Institute Press—the first fictional work they ever published and still their most successful.


    The Second World War by Winston S Churchill

    Dealing with war on a giant scale, THE GRAND ALLIANCE focuses on events as Britain, after fighting a desperate battle alone, was joined in the struggle against the enemy by Soviet Russia and the United Sates. Hitler's invasion of Russia brought to an end a period of almost exactly a year during which Britain and her Empire had stood alone. Six months later, the United States, attacked by Japan, joined the war and the Grand Alliance was born. It was a momentous turn in the course of the war and Sir Winston Churchill noted, 'United we could subdue everybody else in the world. Many disasters, immeasurable cost and tribulation lay ahead, but there was no more doubt about the end.'


    Behind the Lines by W E B Griffin

    Behind the Lines is W. E. B. Griffin's powerful novel of World War II -- and the courage, patriotism, and sacrifice of those who fought it.By 1942, the Japanese have routed the outnumbered American forces and conquered the Philippines. But deep in the island jungles, the combat continues. Refusing to surrender, a renegade Army officer organizes a resistance force and vows to fight to the last man. A Marine leads his team on a mission through the heart of enemy territory.And the nation's proudest sons fight uncelebrated battles that will win -- or lose -- the war . . .


    Battleground by W E B Griffin

    W.E.B. Griffin is a bestselling phenomenom, an American master of authentic military action and drama. Now, in this electrifying new novel, he reveals the story of one of the bloodiest conflicts of the Pacific, the epic struggle for Guadalcanal...Daredevil pilot Charles Galloway learns the hard way how to command a fighter squadron. Lt. Joe Howard teams up with the Coastwatchers. Jack "No Middle Initial" Stecker leads his infantry battalion into the thickest of fighting, at a terrible price. And Navy Captain Pickering grabs a helmet and rifle to join the ranks at Guadalcanal...


    In Danger's Path by W E B Griffin

    An explosive new package for a New York Times bestselling Corps novel.In his new capacity, Brigadier General Fleming Pickering sees many of his trusted men called to duty, plus one he never expected: his son. Together, they will venture into terra incognita.


    Shepherd, The by Frederick Forsyth

    The Shepherd is a 1976 novel by Frederick Forsyth. Forsyth created as an original work as a Christmas gift to his wife after she request a ghost story be written for her. Written on Christmas Day, and published near that time a year later, the idea came while trying to think of a setting away from the typical haunted homes, and seeing planes flying overhead. Many have speculated references to preexisting RAF folklore.


    The Killer Angels by Michael Shaara

    The Killer Angels is a historical novel by Michael Shaara that was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction in 1975. The book tells the story of four days of the Battle of Gettysburg in the American Civil War: June 30, 1863, as the troops of both the Union and the Confederacy move into battle around the town of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, and July 1, July 2, and July 3, when the battle was fought. The story is character driven and told from the perspective of various protagonists.


    The Caine Mutiny by Herman Wouk

    For the Broadway play, see The Caine Mutiny Court-Martial. The Caine Mutiny is a 1951 Pulitzer Prize winning novel by Herman Wouk. The novel grew out of Wouk's personal experiences aboard a destroyer-minesweeper in the Pacific in World War II and deals with, among other things, the moral and ethical decisions made at sea by the captains of ships. The mutiny of the title is legalistic, not violent, and takes place during a historic typhoon in December 1944.


    The Naked and The Dead by Norman Mailer

    Acclaimed as a successful expression of the futility of war, Norman Mailer's The Naked and the Dead follows the story of an army platoon of foot soldiers fighting for the possession of the Japanese-held island of Anopopei during World War II. The novel, which embodies wartime disillusionment, is partly based on Mailer’s own experiences with the 112th Cavalry in the Pacific. Through its four parts, The Naked and the Dead addresses themes of loneliness, death of fear and dying, and brotherhood. The novel is written in gritty, journalistic detail. However, this tone was dialed back as publishers persuaded Mailer to use to euphemism “fug” in lieu of the mother of all curse words — the “F” word — in his novel. The Naked and the Dead sold 200,000 copies in its first three months and was a New York Times best seller for over a year. Despite some controversy among critics, the novel remains important in American literature. The Naked and the Dead is ranked 51st on Modern Library’s “100 Best” English-language novels of the 20th century. The novel was later adapted into a film of the same name in 1958.


    The Sum Of All Fears by Tom Clancy

    The Sum of All Fears is the best-selling thriller novel by Tom Clancy, and part of the Jack Ryan series. It was the fourth book of the series to be turned into a film. An interesting note is that this book was released just days before the Moscow uprising in 1991, which finally signaled the dissolution of the Soviet Union. Russian politics in the aftermath of the destruction of the Berlin Wall is a main element of the book.


    The Red Badge Of Courage by Stephen Crane

    The Red Badge of Courage is an 1895 war novel by American author Stephen Crane. It is considered one of the most influential works in American literature. The novel, a depiction on the cruelty of the American Civil War, features a young recruit who overcomes initial fears to become a hero on the battlefield. The book made Crane an international success.


    The Winds Of War by Herman Wouk

    Follows the various members of the Henry family as they become involved in the events preceeding America's involvement in World War II.


    Red Storm Rising by Tom Clancy

    Red Storm Rising is a 1986 techno-thriller novel by Tom Clancy and Larry Bond about a Third World War in Europe between NATO and Warsaw Pact forces, set around the mid-1980s. Though there are other novels dealing with a fictional World War III, this one is notable for the way in which numerous settings for the action — from Atlantic convoy duty to shooting down reconnaissance satellites to tank battles in Germany — all have an integral part to play on the outcome.


    Without Remorse by Tom Clancy

    Without Remorse is a thriller novel published in 1993 by Tom Clancy and is a part of the "Ryanverse" series. While not the first novel of the series to be published, it is first in plot chronology. The main setting of the book is set during the Vietnam War, in the American city of Baltimore. The book focuses on the development of one of Clancy's recurring characters, John Kelly/John Clark, while providing the character some back-story.


    The Fighting Agents by W E B Griffin

    The Philippines, 1943: As the ragged remnants of the American forces stand against the might of the Imperial Japanese Army, a determined cadre of OSS agents becomes their only contact with the outside world-and their only hope for survival.


    Honor Bound by W E B Griffin

    October 1942. At a secret rendezvous point off the coast of neutral Argentina, a small merchant ship delivers supplies to Nazi submarines and raiders. The OSS is deternined to sabotage the operation by any means necessary. But one of the key saboteurs they've enlisted--a young U.S Marine--must fight his own private battle between duty and honor. Because he was chosen for a reason--to gain trust and support of his own flesh and blood. A powerful Argentinian called "el Coronel." The father he never knew...


    Exodus by Leon Uris



    Secret Honor by W E B Griffin



    Close Combat by W E B Griffin



    Death and Honor by W E B ; Iv, William E Butterworth Griffin



Military Fiction Books & Ephemera


    The Mauritius Command by O'Brian, Patrick

    The Mauritius Command is a historical naval novel by Patrick O'Brian. It is fourth in the series of stories that follow the partnership of Captain Jack Aubrey and the naval surgeon Stephen Maturin. It retells in fictional form the real campaign carried out by the Royal Navy in 1810 under Commodore Josias Rowley.


    The Fortune Of War by O'Brian, Patrick

    The Fortune of War, (1979) is a historical novel set during the War of 1812 and written by British author Patrick O'Brian.


    Sharpe's Gold by Cornwell, Bernard

    Sharpe's Gold is a historical novel by Bernard Cornwell. Set in August 1810 during the Peninsular War and featuring the destruction of Almeida it is the 9th (chronologically) in the Richard Sharpe Series.


    Ww IIi by Slater, Ian

    IAN SLATER, a former defense officer for the Australian Joint Intelligence Bureau, is the author of the WW III and the USA vs. Militia series. He holds a Ph.D. in political science, has taught a wide variety of university courses in the humanities, and is author of the acclaimed biography Orwell: The Road to Airstrip One. He lives in Vancouver, Canada.


    The Last Full Measure by Shaara, Jeff

    Last Full Measure is a ' relaunch novel, which was released on 25 April 2006.


    Battle Cry by Uris, Leon

    Battle Cry is the riveting Marine epic by the bestselling author of such classics as Trinity and Exodus.Originally published in 1953, Leon Uris's Battle Cry is the raw and exciting story of men at war from a legendary American author.This is the story of enlisted men – Marines – at the beginning of World War II. They are a rough–and–ready tangle of guys from America's cities and farms and reservations. Led by a tough veteran sergeant, these soldiers band together to emerge as part of one of the most elite fighting forces in the world. With staggering realism and detail, we follow them into intense battles – Guadalcanal and Tarawa – and through exceptional moments of camaraderie and bravery. Battle Cry does not extol the glories of war, but proves itself to be one of the greatest war stories of all time.


    Hornblower and The Atropos by Forester, C S

    Hornblower and the Atropos is a 1953 historical novel by C.S. Forester. In this novel, Horatio Hornblower is assigned to the Atropos, the smallest vessel in the English navy that qualifies to be commanded by a post-Captain, as he hunts for treasure in the Mediterranean Sea.


    Chains Of Command by Brown, Dale

    Former U.S. Air Force captain Dale Brown is the author of several best-selling military-action-aviation-adventure novels: Flight of the Old Dog (1987), Silver Tower (1988), Day of the Cheetah (1989), Hammerheads (1990), Sky Masters (1991), Night of the Hawk (1992), Chains of Command (1993), Storming Heaven (1994) and Shadows of Steel (1996). Dale's novels are published in 11 languages and distributed to over 70 countries. Dale was born in Buffalo, New York on November 2, 1956. He graduated from Penn State University and received an Air Force commission in 1978. He was a navigator-bombardier in the B-52G Stratofortress heavy bomber and the FB-111A supersonic medium bomber, and is the recipient of several military decorations and awards including the Air Force Commendation Medal with oak leaf cluster, the Combat Crew Award, and the Marksmanship ribbon. He flew over 2500 hours in various military tactical and training aircraft from 1978 to 1986 and was also a graduate of the U.S. Army Airborne School. Dale is a volunteer pilot for AirLifeLine, a non-profit national charitable medical transportation organization who fly needy persons free of charge to receive treatment. He also supports a number of organizations to support and promote law enforcement and reading. He is a member of the Airplane Owners and Pilots Association, The Writers Guild, and a Life Member of the Air Force Association and U.S. Naval Institute. He is a multi-engine and instrument-rated private pilot and can often be found in the skies all across the United States, piloting his Piper Aerostar 602P. On the ground, Dale enjoys tennis, scuba diving, and hockey. He lives in Incline Village, Nevada.


    Nimitz Class by Robinson, Patrick

    The U.S.S. Thomas Jefferson is one of the most powerful warships in the world. A nuclear-powered Nimitz-class aircraft carrier, it is believed to be impregnable. But when the Thomas Jefferson suddenly disappears at sea, the Pentagon is stunned. There was no warning. No apparent attack. And no survivors. All signs point to a nuclear accident. But subsequent reports suggest that a rogue submarine, armed with nuclear warheads, may be on the loose. Where did it come from? How could it get within striking distance of the Thomas Jefferson? Worse yet, where is it now? The deadly chase begins.


    Force 10 From Navarone by MacLean, Alistair

    Force 10 from Navarone is a World War II novel by Scottish author Alistair MacLean published in 1968. It is a sequel to MacLean's very popular 1957 The Guns of Navarone, but in terms of plot continuity chooses to follow the also popular 1961 film adaptation, such as including characters who were in the film but not in the book, although it dispenses with the film's major altered back-story.


    Hms " Ulysses by MacLean, Alistair



    Trial By Fire by Coyle, Harold



    The Commodore by O'Brian, Patrick



    Flight Of the Intruder by Coonts, Stephen



    Code Of Honor by Coyle, Harold



    Short Timers by Hasford, Gustav



    Fox by Hardy, Adam



    Legion Of the Damned by Hassel, Sven



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