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Most valuable Science Fiction books

Curious what the most valuable and expensive science fiction books are? Below is a small sample of some of the most expensive books that have sold on Biblio.com:


Recent Arrivals in Science Fiction

Science Fiction

From The Hobbit to The Silmarillion, from The Hitchhiker's Guide To the Galaxy to Nemesis, we can help you find the science fiction books you are looking for. As the world's largest independent marketplace for new, used and rare books, you always get the best in service and value when you buy from Biblio.com, and all of your purchases are backed by our return guarantee.



Top Sellers in Science Fiction

    The Hobbit by J R R Tolkien

    The Hobbit tells the famous story of Bilbo Baggins, a hobbit who is caught up in the affairs of wizards. His journey through Mirkwood and the climactic confrontation with the dragon Smaug served as the launching point for Tolkien's transformative trilogy, The Lord of the Rings. Many of the essential elements of Tolkien's classic saga have their roots in this children's book. The first impression of the first edition ran as a limited printing of 1500 copies, and authentic copies with the dust jacket will include a well known hand correction, in black ink, of a misspelling of the last name of Reverend Charles Dodgson (better known as Lewis Carroll) on the back flap. A first edition, first printing of the original U.K. edition can run over $40,000. Signed copies of this edition have been appraised at over $100,000 U.S. Later printings of the first edition also retain much value for collectors. The first U.S. Edition, printed in 1938 by Houghton Mifflin Company, is prized and is commonly sold to collectors at prices well over $2,000. Chips to the cover, a missing dustcover, wear to the spine, and damage to the map in the endpaper, are some of the more common flaws for this book. The story remains popular, and stands as one of the most enduring (and endearing) stories of the last century. The Hobbit sparked a creative explosion in speculative fiction, a fire that burns brightly to this day. The revival in interest in recent years, in part due to the popularity of the film series inspired by Tolkien's books only shows the timelessness of his story, and the importance of his work.


    A Game Of Thrones by George R R Martin

    A Game of Thrones is the first of seven planned novels in A Song of Ice and Fire, an epic fantasy series by American author George R. R. Martin. It was first published on 6 August 1996. The novel won the 1997 Locus Award, and was nominated for both the 1998 Nebula Award and the 1997 World Fantasy Award. The novella Blood of the Dragon, comprising the Daenerys Targaryen chapters from the novel, won the 1997 Hugo Award for Best Novella.


    Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury

    Fahrenheit 451 (Ballantine Books, 1953) by Ray Bradbury is a dystopian novel that presents a future American society in which the masses are hedonistic and critical thought through reading is outlawed. Written in the early years of the Cold War, the novel is a critique of what Bradbury saw as issues in American society of the era. Bradbury combined two of his early short stories, "The Pedestrian" and  "Bright Phoenix," into The Fireman, a novella published in the February 1951 issue of Galaxy Science Fiction. Bradbury's publisher at Ballantine Books then suggested that he expand the work to make into a novel—Fahrenheit 451.


    Harry Potter and The Half-Blood Prince by J K Rowling

    Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince, released on 16 July 2005, is the sixth of seven novels from British author J. K. Rowling's popular Harry Potter series. Set during Harry Potter's sixth year at Hogwarts, the novel explores Lord Voldemort's past, and Harry's preparations for the final battle amidst emerging romantic relationships and the emotional confusions and conflict resolutions characteristic of mid-adolescence.


    Outlander by Diana Gabaldon

    Claire Randall is leading a double life. She has a husband in one century, and a lover in another...In 1945, Claire Randall, a former combat nurse, is back from the war and reunited with her husband on a second honeymoon--when she innocently touches a boulder in one of the ancient stone circles that dot the British Isles. Suddenly she is a Sassenach--an "outlander"--in a Scotland torn by war and raiding border clans in the year of our Lord...1743.Hurled back in time by forces she cannot understand, Claire's destiny in soon inextricably intertwined with Clan MacKenzie and the forbidden Castle Leoch. She is catapulted without warning into the intrigues of lairds and spies that may threaten her life ...and shatter her heart. For here, James Fraser, a gallant young Scots warrior, shows her a passion so fierce and a love so absolute that Claire becomes a woman torn between fidelity and desire...and between two vastly different men in two irreconcilable lives.From the Trade Paperback edition.


    Ender's Game by Orson Scott Card

    Originally published as a short story in 1977 in Analog Science Fiction and Fact , Ender's Game is a science fiction novel by Orson Scott Card, published in book form in 1985 by Tor. A futuristic novel, the protagonist, Ender Wiggin is taken at a very young age to a training center known as the Battle School, where he learns military tactics and maneuvers. As part of his supposed training, he is sent on a simulation battle only to find - upon his victory against the invading Buggers - that it was not in fact a simulation at all, but was in fact real. Ender's Game has remained popular and collectible since its publication. It won both the Hugo and Nebula awards for Science fiction and later a major motion picture was made from it in 2013. As a result, it is very collectible, and a signed first edition, while not particularly rare, can be found for $2,000-3,000. Easton Press later issued a leather bound signed edition , which is typically available for several hundred dollars. The aforementioned original appearance, in short story form can be found as well in the same price range.


    Harry Potter and The Goblet Of Fire by J K Rowling

    Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire (Harry Potter, #4) keeps having horrible dreams that wake him with the scar on his forehead throbbing. He is relieved to return to the magical realm from his summer break early to attend the Quidditch World Cup with the Weasleys, but the relief quickly gives way to a dark threat that looms over the magical world. Being a teenager is hard enough without having a Dark Lord seeking your destruction! Hugo Award for Best Novel (2001) , Mythopoeic Fantasy Award for Adolescent Literature (2008) , Publieksprijs voor het Nederlandse Boek (2001) , Golden Archer Award for Middle/Junior High (2002) , Indian Paintbrush Book Award (2002)  


    Alice's Adventures In Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass by Lewis Carroll

    Lewis Carroll's Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and its sequel, Through the Looking Glass and What Alice Found There, tell the story of a young girl in a fantasy world filled with peculiar, anthropomorphic creatures. The classic tale of literary nonsense takes the reader on an exploration of logic and absurdities. The Alice books — sometimes combined or referred to with the abbreviated title Alice in Wonderland — have been translated into at least 97 languages with over a hundred different editions. The books have also been adapted numerous times into films (both live action and cartoon), plays, and musicals.


    Dragonfly In Amber by Diana Gabaldon

    Dragonfly in Amber, the second book in the best-selling Outlander series, is written by Diana Gabaldon. Her books are difficult to classify by genre, since they contain elements of romantic fiction, historical fiction, and science fiction. The stories center around a time-travelling 20th-century nurse (Claire Randall) and her 18th-century Scottish husband (Jamie Fraser), and are located in Scotland, France, the West Indies, and America.


    Harry Potter and The Deathly Hallows by J K Rowling

    Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows is the seventh and final of the Harry Potter novels written by British author J. K. Rowling. The book was released on 21 July 2007, ending the series that began in 1997 with the publication of Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone. This book chronicles the events directly following Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince (2005), and leads to the long-awaited final confrontation between Harry Potter and Lord Voldemort.


    Harry Potter and The Order Of the Phoenix by J K Rowling

    Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix (Harry Potter, #5) shows us how the plot begins to thicken in this  renowned series.  The tale grows darker and becomes psychologically intense as the teenaged boy wizard much handle his social life as well as the dark forces that seek to take him down! The greater community begins to doubt Harry and the existence of Voldemort's return, and Hogwarts is overtaken by an oppressive representative from the Ministry of Magic.  We meet the dread Dementors, and Harry loses loved ones in this tale of his exhausting fifth year! Bram Stoker Award for Works for Young Readers (2003) , Anthony Award for Young Adult (2004) , Mythopoeic Fantasy Award for Adolescent Literature (2008) , Books I Loved Best Yearly (BILBY) Awards for Older Readers (2004) , Colorado Blue Spruce Young Adult Book Award (2006) ...more Colorado Blue Spruce Young Adult Book Award (2006) , Golden Archer Award for Middle/Junior High (2005) , ALA Teens' Top Ten (2004) , Carnegie Medal Nominee (2003)


    The Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain

    Commonly named among the Great American novels, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, written by Mark Twain, is generally regarded as the sequel to his earlier novel, The Adventures of Tom Sawyer; however, in Huckleberry Finn, Twain focused increasingly on the institution of slavery and the South. Narrated by Huckleberry “Huck” Finn in Southern antebellum vernacular, the novel gives vivid descriptions of people and daily life along the Mississippi River while following the adventure of Huck and a runaway slave, Jim, rafting their way to freedom.


    Dragon Reborn by Robert Jordan

    The Dragon Reborn (abbreviated as tDR by fans) is the third book of American author Robert Jordan's fantasy series The Wheel of Time. It was published by Tor Books and released on September 15, 1991. The unabridged audio book is read by Michael Kramer and Kate Reading.


    Lord Of the Rings, The by J R R Tolkien

    The Lord of the Rings is an epic high fantasy novel written by philologist and Oxford University professor J. R. R. Tolkien. The story began as a sequel to Tolkien's earlier, less complex children's fantasy novel The Hobbit (1937), but eventually developed into a much larger work. It was written in stages between 1937 and 1949, much of it during World War II.


    A Storm Of Swords by George R R Martin

    A Storm of Swords is the third of seven planned novels in A Song of Ice and Fire, an epic fantasy series by American author George R. R. Martin. It was first published on 8 August 2000 in the United Kingdom, with a United States edition following in November 2000. Its publication was preceded by a novella called Path of the Dragon, which collects some of the Daenerys Targaryen chapters from the novel into a single book. To date, A Storm of Swords is the longest novel in the series.


    A Clash Of Kings by George R R Martin

    A Clash of Kings (A Song of Ice and Fire, #2) The Seven Kingdoms have fallen asunder, as the sadistic teenager, Joffrey of House Lannister, ascends the Iron Throne following the death of his "father," Robert the Usurper. The Stark family in the North rises to power to combat this ascension, and the empowered Daenerys, the exiled last heir of the former ruling family, seeks a way to return to Westeros and rule it. Meanwhile the Night's Watch, the orphans and criminals who guard Westeros from the barbarians who live beyond the Wall find their numbers dwindling in the face of fantastical forces. Nebula Award Nominee (2000) , Locus Award for Best Fantasy Novel (1999)


    The Road by Cormac McCarthy

    The Road is a 2006 novel by American writer Cormac McCarthy. It is a post-apocalyptic tale of a journey taken by a father and his young son over a period of several months, across a landscape blasted by an unnamed cataclysm that destroyed all civilization and, apparently, almost all life on earth. The novel was awarded the 2007 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction and the James Tait Black Memorial Prize for Fiction in 2006.


    Voyager by Diana Gabaldon

    This is the third novel in the bestselling outlander series. Jamie Fraser is lying on the battlefield of Culloden, where he rises wounded, to face execution or imprisonment. Either prospect pales beside the pain of loss - his wife is gone. Forever. But sometimes forever is shorter than one thinks. In 1746, Claire Fraser made a perilous journey through time, leaving her young husband to die at Culloden, in order to protect their unborn child. In 1968, Claire has just been struck through the heart, discovering that Jamie Fraser didn't die in battle. But where is Jamie now? With the help of her grown daughter, Claire sets out to find the man who was her life - and might be once again.


    Slaughterhouse-Five by Kurt Vonnegut

    Slaughterhouse-Five, or The Children's Crusade: A Duty-Dance with Death is a satirical novel by Kurt Vonnegut and is generally recognized as his most influential and popular work. Set around World War II, the novels tells of the story of Billy Pilgrim, a chaplain’s assistant, and his experiences and journeys through time. Billy sees when, how, and why he will die, resulting in his becoming fatalistic. The refrain “so it goes” is used when death, dying, and mortality occur and it appears in the book 106 times. Additionally, the novel can be read as semi-autobiographical: Vonnegut was present during the firebombing of Dresden, a central event in the novel. Shortly after publication, Slaughterhouse-Five was nominated for two best novel recognitions, a Nebula Award and a Hugo Award, though it lost both to Ursula K. Le Guin’s The Left Hand of Darkness. The Modern Library ranked Slaughterhouse-Five eighteenth on its list of the “100 Best” English-language novels of the 20th century in 1998. It is also listed in TIME’s “100 Best Novels” (since 1923). However, mainly due to its irreverent tone and obscene content, Slaughterhouse-Five has been the subject of many attempts at censorship. The novel treats one of the most horrific massacres in European history—the firebombing of Dresden—with mock-serious humor and clear antiwar sentiment. It also depicts sexuality to a revolutionary extent as one of the first literary acknowledgments that homosexual men, referred to in the novel as “fairies,” were among the victims of the Nazi Holocaust. Thus, Slaughterhouse-Five is listed in the American Library Association's list of the “Most Frequently Challenged Books of 1990–1999” as well as the ALA's “Most Frequently Challenged Books of 2000–2009.”  The novel has been adapted more than a handful of times, most notably a film adaptation by the same name made in 1972. Although the film did poorly in the box office, it was critically praised, winning the Prix du Jury at the 1972 Cannes Film Festival.


    Nineteen Eighty-Four by George Orwell

    Nineteen Eighty-Four (1984) by George Orwell has become the definitive dystopian novel of the twentieth century. Originally published in on June 8, 1949 by Secker and Warburg in the United Kingdom, the book follows the main character, Winston Smith, through his disillusionment with totalitarianism and a doomed struggle of resistance. George Orwell is a pen-name, Orwell's real name was Eric Blair.


    Atlas Shrugged by Ayn Rand

    Atlas Shrugged is a novel by Ayn Rand, first published in 1957 in the United States. This was Rand's fourth, longest and last novel, and she considered it her magnum opus in the realm of fiction writing. As indicated by its working title The Strike, the book explores a dystopian United States where leading innovators, ranging from industrialists to artists, refuse to be exploited by society.


    Feast For Crows by George R R Martin

    A Feast for Crows is the fourth of seven planned novels in A Song of Ice and Fire, an epic fantasy series by American author George R. R. Martin. The novel was first published on 17 October 2005 in the United Kingdom, with a United States edition following on 8 November 2005; however, it appeared ahead of the publication date in several UK bookshops. Its publication was preceded by a novella named Arms of the Kraken, which collected the first four Iron Islands chapters together.


    Harry Potter and The Chamber Of Secrets by J K Rowling

    Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets (Harry Potter, #2) finds the hero of Hogwarts back to his humble home with the Dursleys for summer break.  Between their efforts, and that of a strange and much-abused house-elf, Harry feels like he might never make it back to complete his wizard training! Even back at Hogwarts, danger abounds!  A mysterious "Chamber of Secrets" has been opened, and the young wizard and his friends must use everything they can to save each other from certain doom! The truth lies behind a magical diary, a ghost who lives inside a toilet, a pompous new teacher and ends with the Dark Wizard Voldemort. Mythopoeic Fantasy Award for Adolescent Literature (2008) , British Book Award (1999) , Smarties Prize (1999) , Prijs van de Jonge Jury (2002) , Booklist 1999 Editor's choice (1999)


    The Silmarillion by J R R Tolkien

    The Silmarillion is a collection of J. R. R. Tolkien's mythopoeic works, edited and published posthumously by his son Christopher Tolkien in 1977, with assistance from Guy Gavriel Kay, who later became a noted fantasy writer. The Silmarillion, along with J. R. R. Tolkien's other works, forms a comprehensive, yet incomplete, narrative that describes the universe of Middle-earth within which The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings take place.


Science Fiction Books & Ephemera


    The Hitchhiker's Guide To the Galaxy by Adams, Douglas

    " IRRESISTIBLE! " -- The Boston Globe: Seconds before the Earth is demolished to make way for a galactic freeway, Arthur Dent is plucked off the planet by his friend Ford Prefect, a researcher for the revised edition of The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy who, for the last fifteen years, has been posing as an out-of-work actor.Together this dynamic pair begin a journey through space aided by quotes from The Hitchhiker's Guide ("A towel is about the most massively useful thing an interstellar hitchhiker can have") and a galaxy-full of fellow travelers: Zaphod Beeblebrox--the two-headed, three-armed ex-hippie and totally out-to-lunch president of the galaxy; Trillian, Zaphod's girlfriend (formally Tricia McMillan), whom Arthur tried to pick up at a cocktail party once upon a time zone; Marvin, a paranoid, brilliant, and chronically depressed robot; Veet Voojagig, a former graduate student who is obsessed with the disappearance of all the ballpoint pens he bought over the years. Where are these pens? Why are we born? Why do we die? Why do we spend so much time between wearing digital watches? For all the answers stick your thumb to the stars. And don't forget to bring a towel!"[A] WHIMSICAL ODYSSEY...Characters frolic through the galaxy with infectious joy."--Publishers WeeklyFrom the Paperback edition.


    The Faded Sun by Cherryh, C J

    Publishedin 1978 The Faded Sun series by Cherryh has won much acclaim. Book #1 received the Hugo Award Nominee for Best Novel (1979) , Nebula Award Nominee for Novel (1978) , and Locus Poll Award Nominee for Best SF Novel (1979).


    The Fellowship Of the Ring by Tolkien, J R R

    The Fellowship of the Ring is the first of three volumes of the epic novel The Lord of the Rings by the English author J. R. R. Tolkien. It takes place in the fictional universe Middle-earth. It was originally published on July 29, 1954 in the United Kingdom. The volume consists of a Prologue "Concerning Hobbits, and other matters" followed by Book I and Book II.


    The Songs Of Distant Earth by Clarke, Arthur C

    The Songs of Distant Earth is the common title of several science fiction works by Arthur C. Clarke, including a science fiction short story, a short movie synopsis, and a 1986 science fiction novel that all bear the same title. This article deals with the novel.


    The Firebrand by Bradley, Marion Zimmer

    Born of noble blood, Kassandra is gifted with the ability to see into the futureand her visions tell of a battle that will bring the wrath of the gods upon all of Greece. She has foreseen the fall of Troy, but no one believes Kassandras prophecies, or heeds her warnings about the beautiful woman known as Helen...


    So Long, and Thanks For All the Fish by Adams, Douglas

    So Long, and Thanks for All the Fish is the fourth book of the Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy series written by Douglas Adams. Its title is the message left by the dolphins when they departed Planet Earth just before it was demolished to make way for a hyperspatial express route, as described in The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy.


    The Two Towers by Tolkien, J R R

    The Two Towers is the second volume of J. R. R. Tolkien's high fantasy novel The Lord of the Rings. It is preceded by The Fellowship of the Ring and followed by The Return of the King.


    The War Of the Worlds by Wells, H G

    The War of the Worlds (1898) is a science fiction novel by H. G. Wells describing an invasion of late Victorian England by Martians equipped with advanced weaponry. It is a seminal depiction of an alien invasion of Earth. The novel is narrated by an unnamed writer of scientific articles. Throughout the narrative he struggles to reunite with his wife, while witnessing the Martians rampaging through the southern English counties. The plot has been related to invasion literature of the time.


    The Robots Of Dawn by Asimov, Isaac

    The Robots of Dawn is a "whodunit" science fiction novel by Isaac Asimov, first published in 1983. It is the third novel in Asimov's Robot series. It was nominated for both the Hugo and Locus Awards in 1984.


    The Invisible Man by Wells, H G

    Invisible Man is a novel written by Ralph Ellison, and the only one that he published during his lifetime. It won him the National Book Award in 1953. The novel addresses many of the social and intellectual issues facing African-Americans in the early twentieth century, including black nationalism, the relationship between black identity and Marxism, and the reformist racial policies of Booker T. Washington, as well as issues of individuality and personal identity.


    The Return Of the King by Tolkien, J R R

    The Return of the King is the third and final volume of J. R. R. Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings, following The Fellowship of the Ring and The Two Towers.


    Mostly Harmless by Adams, Douglas

    Mostly Harmless is a novel by Douglas Adams and the fifth book in the Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy series. It is described on the cover of the first editions as "The fifth book in the increasingly inaccurately named Hitchhikers Trilogy".


    Trouble With Lichen by Wyndham, John

    Francis Saxover and Diana Brackley, two scientists investigating a rare lichen, discover it has a remarkable property: it retards the aging process. Francis, realising the implications for the world of an ever-youthful, wealthy elite, wants to keep it secret, but Diana sees an opportunity to overturn the male status quo by using the lichen to inspire a feminist revolution.As each scientist wrestles with the implications and practicalities of exploiting the discovery, the world comes ever closer to learning the truth . . .Trouble With Lichen is a scintillating story of the power wielded by science in our lives and asks how much trust should we place in those we appoint to be its guardians?


    The White Plague by Herbert, Frank

    Frank Herbert was born in Tacoma, Washington, and educated at the University of Washington, Seattle. He worked a wide variety of jobs--including TV cameraman, radio commentator, oyster diver, jungle survival instructor, lay analyst, creative writing teacher, reporter and editor of several West Coast newspapers--before becoming a full-time writer. He died in 1986.


    The Day Of the Triffids by Wyndham, John

    The Day of the Triffids is a post-apocalyptic novel written in 1951 by the English science fiction author John Wyndham. Although Wyndham had already published other novels, this was the first published under the John Wyndham pen-name. It established him as an important writer, and remains his best known novel. When Bill Masen wakes up blindfolded in hospital there is a bitter irony in his situation. Carefully removing his bandages, he realizes that he is the only person who can see: everyone else, doctors and patients alike, have been blinded by a meteor shower. Now, with civilization in chaos, the triffids - huge, venomous, large-rooted plants able to 'walk', feeding on human flesh - can have their day. The Day of the Triffids , published in 1951, expresses many of the political concerns of its time: the Cold War, the fear of biological experimentation and the man-made apocalypse. However, with its terrifyingly believable insights into the genetic modification of plants, the book is more relevant today than ever before.


    God Emperor Of Dune by Herbert, Frank

    God Emperor of Dune is a science fiction novel by Frank Herbert published in 1981, the fourth in the Dune series.


    Foundation by Asimov, Isaac

    One of the great masterworks of science fiction, the Foundation novels of Isaac Asimov are unsurpassed for their unique blend of nonstop action, daring ideas, and extensive world-building. The story of our future begins with the history of Foundation and its greatest psychohistorian: Hari Seldon. For twelve thousand years the Galactic Empire has ruled supreme. Now it is dying. Only Hari Seldon, creator of the revolutionary science of psychohistory, can see into the future--a dark age of ignorance, barbarism, and warfare that will last thirty thousand years. To preserve knowledge and save mankind, Seldon gathers the best minds in the Empire--both scientists and scholars--and brings them to a bleak planet at the edge of the Galaxy to serve as a beacon of hope for future generations. He calls his sanctuary the Foundation.But soon the fledgling Foundation finds itself at the mercy of corrupt warlords rising in the wake of the receding Empire. And mankind's last best hope is faced with an agonizing choice: submit to the barbarians and live as slaves--or take a stand for freedom and risk total destruction.From the Hardcover edition.


    Doctor Who by Dicks, Terrance



    Analog by Schmidt, Stanley



    Nemesis by Asimov, Isaac



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