World Literature

From One Hundred Years Of Solitude to Quo Vadis, from The Little Prince to Odyssey, we can help you find the world literature books you are looking for. As the world's largest independent marketplace for new, used and rare books, you always get the best in service and value when you buy from Biblio.com, and all of your purchases are backed by our return guarantee.

Top Sellers in World Literature

One Hundred Years Of Solitude

One Hundred Years Of Solitude

by Gabriel Garcia Marquez

One Hundred Years of Solitude chronicles the life of Macondo, a fictional town based in part of Garcia Marquez's hometown of Aracataca, Columbia, and seven generations of the founding family, the Buendias. He creates a complex world with characters and events that display the full range of human experience. For the reader, the pleasure of the novel derives from its fast-paced narrative, humor, vivid characters, and fantasy elements. In this 'magic realism', the author combines imaginative flights of... Read more about this item
The Little Prince

The Little Prince

by Antoine De Saint-Exupery

The Little Prince by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry is a charming and philosophical novella that tells the story of a young prince who travels from planet to planet, encountering various eccentric characters along the way. Through his encounters, the prince learns valuable lessons about life, love, and human nature. The book explores themes of innocence, friendship, and the importance of seeing beyond the surface to discover deeper truths. With its whimsical illustrations and poignant prose, The Little Prince... Read more about this item
Anna Karenina

Anna Karenina

by Leo Tolstoy

Anna Karenina is a novel by Leo Tolstoy, published in 1877. The story is set in 19th-century Russia and follows the life of Anna Karenina, a married woman who embarks on an affair with the wealthy Count Vronsky. As their affair becomes more passionate, Anna must grapple with the societal norms and expectations of her time, which view infidelity as a serious transgression. The novel explores themes of love, desire, societal expectations, and the consequences of our actions. It is considered one of the... Read more about this item
The Master and Margarita

The Master and Margarita

by Mikhail Bulgakov

The Master and Margarita is a novel by Mikhail Bulgakov, woven around the premise of a visit by the Devil to the fervently atheistic Soviet Union. Many critics consider the book to be one of the greatest novels of the 20th century, as well as one of the foremost Soviet satires, directed against a social order seen as suffocatingly bureaucratic.
The Divine Comedy

The Divine Comedy

by Dante Alighieri

Dante Alighieri was born in 1265. Considered Italy's greatest poet, this scion of a Florentine family mastered in the art of lyric poetry at an early age. His first major work is La Vita Nuova (1292) which is a tribute to Beatrice Portinari, the great love of his life. Married to Gemma Donatic, Dante's political activism resulted in his being exiled from Florence to eventually settle in Ravenna. It is believed that The Divine Comedy—comprised of three canticles, The Inferno, The Purgatorio, and... Read more about this item
Siddhartha

Siddhartha

by Hermann Hesse

Hesse's famous and influential novel, Siddartha, is perhaps the most important and compelling moral allegory our troubled century has produced. Integrating Eastern and Western spiritual traditions with psychoanalysis and philosophy, this strangely simple tale, written with a deep and moving empathy for humanity, has touched the lives of millions since its original publication in 1922. Set in India, Siddhartha is the story of a young Brahmin's search for ultimate reality after meeting with the Buddha.... Read more about this item
The Plague

The Plague

by Albert Camus

Albert Camus' parable, The Plague, tells the tale of a town beset by a horrible disease carried in from rats in the sewer, and the lessons the main characters learn as they face humanity in the destruction of the plague.
The Republic

The Republic

by Plato

The Republic is Plato's most famous work and one of the seminal texts of Western philosophy and politics. The characters in this Socratic dialogue - including Socrates himself - discuss whether the just or unjust man is happier. They are the philosopher-kings of imagined cities and they also discuss the nature of philosophy and the soul among other things.
The Unbearable Lightness Of Being

The Unbearable Lightness Of Being

by Milan Kundera

The Unbearable Lightness of Being (1984), by Milan Kundera, is a philosophic novel about a man and his two women and their lives in the Prague Spring of the Czechoslovak Communist period in 1968. Although written in 1982, the novel was not published until two years later, in France; the Czech: Nesnesitelná lehkost bytí and French: l'Insoutenable légèreté de l'être titles are the more common worldwide.
The Prince

The Prince

by Niccolo MacHiavelli

The Prince is a political treatise by the Italian public servant and political theorist Niccolò Machiavelli. Originally called De Principatibus (About Principalities), it was originally written in 1513, but not published until 1532, five years after Machiavelli's death. The Prince was one of the first works of modern philosophy, in which pragmatic ends, as opposed to teleological concepts, are the purpose.
Heidi

Heidi

by Johanna Spyri

Heidi is a classic children's book first published
in 1881 in Germany by Swiss author Johanna Spyri in two parts: Heidi:
Her Years of Wandering and Learning, and Heidi: How She Used
What She Learned. Subtitled: "Geschichten für Kinder wie
auch für Solche, Welche Kinder lieb haben von Johanna Spyri” Stories for children as well as those that love children by Johanna
Spyri). It is one of the best-selling books ever written, and one of
the best-known pieces of Swiss literature.Heidi tells the story of... Read more about this item
Madame Bovary

Madame Bovary

by Gustave Flaubert

Madame Bovary is Gustave Flaubert's first novel and considered his masterpiece. The story focuses on a doctor's wife, Emma Bovary, who has adulterous affairs and lives beyond her means in order to escape the banalities and emptiness of provincial life. Though the basic plot is rather simple, even archetypal, the novel's true art lies in its details and hidden patterns.
The Trial

The Trial

by Franz Kafka

It is the fate and perhaps the greatness of that work that it offers everything and confirms nothing' Albert CamusThe terrifying tale of Joseph K, a respectable functionary in a bank, who is suddenly arrested and must defend his innocence against a charge about which he can get no information. A nightmare vision of the excesses of modern bureaucracy wedded to the mad agendas of twentieth-century totalitarian regimes.
The Magic Mountain

The Magic Mountain

by Thomas Mann

Thomas Mann was born in 1875 in Germany. He was only twenty-five when his first novel, Buddenbrooks, was published. In 1924 The Magic Mountain was published, and, five years later, Mann was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature. Following the rise of the Nazis to power, he left Germany for good in 1933 to live in Switzerland and then in California, where he wrote Doctor Faustus (first published in the United States in 1948). Thomas Mann died in 1955.
The Neverending Story

The Neverending Story

by Michael Ende

The Neverending Story is a German fantasy novel by Michael Ende, first published in 1979 under the title Die unendliche Geschichte. The standard English translation, by Ralph Manheim, was first published in 1983. The novel was later adapted into several films. The majority of the story takes place in the parallel world of Fantastica (Phantásien in the original German version; referred to as Fantasia in the films), a world being destroyed by the Nothing, which represents and constitutes people's lack of... Read more about this item
Don Quixote

Don Quixote

by Cervantes Miguel De

Don Quixote, fully titled The Ingenious Hidalgo Don Quixote of La Mancha, is a novel written by Spanish author Miguel de Cervantes. Cervantes created a fictional origin for the story by creating a fictional Moorish chronicler for Don Quixote named Cide Hamete Benengeli. Published in two volumes a decade apart (in 1605 and 1615), Don Quixote is the most influential work of literature to emerge from the Spanish Golden Age and the entire Spanish literary canon.
Demian

Demian

by Hermann Hesse

Demian: The Story of Emil Sinclair's Youth is a bildungsroman by Hermann Hesse, first published in 1919; a prologue was added in 1960. Demian was first published under the pseudonym "Emil Sinclair", the name of the narrator of the story, but Hesse was later revealed to be the author. The novel was written in just three weeks.
Fathers and Sons

Fathers and Sons

by Ivan Turgenev

Turgenev?s timeless tale of generational collision, in a sparkling new translation When Arkady Petrovich returns home from college, his father finds his eager, naïve son changed almost beyond recognition, for the impressionable Arkady has fallen under the powerful influence of the friend he has brought home with him. A self-proclaimed nihilist, the ardent young Bazarov shocks Arkady?s father with his criticisms of the landowning way of life and his determination to overthrow the traditional values... Read more about this item
The Castle

The Castle

by Franz Kafka

The Castle (original title: "Das Schloß") is the story of K., the unwanted Land Surveyor who is never to be admitted to the Castle nor accepted in the village, and yet cannot go home. As he encounters dualities of certainty and doubt, hope and fear, and reason and nonsense, K.'s struggles in the absurd, labyrinthine world where he finds himself seem to reveal an inexplicable truth about the nature of existence. Kafka began The Castle in 1922 and it was never finished, yet this, the last of his three... Read more about this item
Austerlitz

Austerlitz

by W G Sebald

W. G. Sebald taught at the University of East Anglia in Norwich, England, for thirty years, becoming Professor of European Literature in 1987, and from 1989 to 1994 was the first Director of the British Centre for Literary Translation. His three previous books won several international awards, including the L.A. Times Book Award for fiction, the Berlin Literature Prize and the Literatur Nord Prize. W. G. Sebald was killed in a car accident at age 57 in December 2001.
Hopscotch

Hopscotch

by Julio Cortazar

JULIO CORTAZAR was born in 1914 in Belgium to Argentinean parents, grew up in Buenos Aires, and moved to Paris in 1951. An acclaimed and influential novelist, short-story writer, poet, playwright, and essayist, he was also a human rights advocate and amateur jazz musician. He died in Paris in 1984.
My Name Is Red

My Name Is Red

by Orhan Pamuk

My Name Is Red (Benim Adım Kırmızı) is a Turkish novel by Nobel laureate author Orhan Pamuk. It won the International IMPAC Dublin Literary Award in 2003, as well as the French Prix du meilleur livre étranger and Italian Premio Grinzane Cavour awards in 2002. The novel and its English translation established Pamuk's international reputation and contributed to his winning of the Nobel prize.
The Emigrants

The Emigrants

by W G Sebald

The Flowers Of Evil

The Flowers Of Evil

by Charles Baudelaire

Quo Vadis

Quo Vadis

by Henryk Sienkiewicz

World Literature Books & Ephemera

The Little Prince

The Little Prince

by Saint-Exupery, Antoine De

The Little Prince by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry is a charming and philosophical novella that tells the story of a young prince who travels from planet to planet, encountering various eccentric characters along the way. Through his encounters, the prince learns valuable lessons about life, love, and human nature. The book explores themes of innocence, friendship, and the importance of seeing beyond the surface to discover deeper truths. With its whimsical illustrations and poignant prose, The Little Prince... Read more about this item
The Trial

The Trial

by Kafka, Franz

It is the fate and perhaps the greatness of that work that it offers everything and confirms nothing' Albert CamusThe terrifying tale of Joseph K, a respectable functionary in a bank, who is suddenly arrested and must defend his innocence against a charge about which he can get no information. A nightmare vision of the excesses of modern bureaucracy wedded to the mad agendas of twentieth-century totalitarian regimes.
One Hundred Years Of Solitude

One Hundred Years Of Solitude

by Marquez, Gabriel Garcia

One Hundred Years of Solitude chronicles the life of Macondo, a fictional town based in part of Garcia Marquez's hometown of Aracataca, Columbia, and seven generations of the founding family, the Buendias. He creates a complex world with characters and events that display the full range of human experience. For the reader, the pleasure of the novel derives from its fast-paced narrative, humor, vivid characters, and fantasy elements. In this 'magic realism', the author combines imaginative flights of... Read more about this item
The Plague

The Plague

by Camus, Albert

Albert Camus' parable, The Plague, tells the tale of a town beset by a horrible disease carried in from rats in the sewer, and the lessons the main characters learn as they face humanity in the destruction of the plague.
Euripides

Euripides

by Euripides

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Text in Greek; introduction, notes, and commentary in English.
Mr Palomar

Mr Palomar

by Calvino, Italo

Mr. Palomar, whose name purposely evokes that of the famous telescope, is a seeker after knowledge, a visionary in a world sublime and ridiculous. Whether contemplating a cheese, a woman’s breasts, or a gorilla’s behavior, he brings us a vision of a world familiar by consensus, fragmented by the burden of individual perception. Translated by William Weaver. A Helen and Kurt Wolff Book
The Unbearable Lightness Of Being

The Unbearable Lightness Of Being

by Kundera, Milan

The Unbearable Lightness of Being (1984), by Milan Kundera, is a philosophic novel about a man and his two women and their lives in the Prague Spring of the Czechoslovak Communist period in 1968. Although written in 1982, the novel was not published until two years later, in France; the Czech: Nesnesitelná lehkost bytí and French: l'Insoutenable légèreté de l'être titles are the more common worldwide.
Wind, Sand and Stars

Wind, Sand and Stars

by Saint-Exupery, Antoine De

Recipient of the Grand Prix of the Académie Française, Wind, Sand and Stars captures the grandeur, danger, and isolation of flight. Its exciting account of air adventure, combined with lyrical prose and the spirit of a philosopher, makes it one of the most popular works ever written about flying. Translated by Lewis Galantière.
My Name Is Red

My Name Is Red

by Pamuk, Orhan

My Name Is Red (Benim Adım Kırmızı) is a Turkish novel by Nobel laureate author Orhan Pamuk. It won the International IMPAC Dublin Literary Award in 2003, as well as the French Prix du meilleur livre étranger and Italian Premio Grinzane Cavour awards in 2002. The novel and its English translation established Pamuk's international reputation and contributed to his winning of the Nobel prize.
The Neverending Story

The Neverending Story

by Ende, Michael

The Neverending Story is a German fantasy novel by Michael Ende, first published in 1979 under the title Die unendliche Geschichte. The standard English translation, by Ralph Manheim, was first published in 1983. The novel was later adapted into several films. The majority of the story takes place in the parallel world of Fantastica (Phantásien in the original German version; referred to as Fantasia in the films), a world being destroyed by the Nothing, which represents and constitutes people's lack of... Read more about this item
The Master and Margarita

The Master and Margarita

by Bulgakov, Mikhail

The Master and Margarita is a novel by Mikhail Bulgakov, woven around the premise of a visit by the Devil to the fervently atheistic Soviet Union. Many critics consider the book to be one of the greatest novels of the 20th century, as well as one of the foremost Soviet satires, directed against a social order seen as suffocatingly bureaucratic.
The Magic Mountain

The Magic Mountain

by Mann, Thomas

Thomas Mann was born in 1875 in Germany. He was only twenty-five when his first novel, Buddenbrooks, was published. In 1924 The Magic Mountain was published, and, five years later, Mann was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature. Following the rise of the Nazis to power, he left Germany for good in 1933 to live in Switzerland and then in California, where he wrote Doctor Faustus (first published in the United States in 1948). Thomas Mann died in 1955.
The Divine Comedy

The Divine Comedy

by Alighieri, Dante

Dante Alighieri was born in 1265. Considered Italy's greatest poet, this scion of a Florentine family mastered in the art of lyric poetry at an early age. His first major work is La Vita Nuova (1292) which is a tribute to Beatrice Portinari, the great love of his life. Married to Gemma Donatic, Dante's political activism resulted in his being exiled from Florence to eventually settle in Ravenna. It is believed that The Divine Comedy—comprised of three canticles, The Inferno, The Purgatorio, and... Read more about this item
The Castle

The Castle

by Kafka, Franz

The Castle (original title: "Das Schloß") is the story of K., the unwanted Land Surveyor who is never to be admitted to the Castle nor accepted in the village, and yet cannot go home. As he encounters dualities of certainty and doubt, hope and fear, and reason and nonsense, K.'s struggles in the absurd, labyrinthine world where he finds himself seem to reveal an inexplicable truth about the nature of existence. Kafka began The Castle in 1922 and it was never finished, yet this, the last of his three... Read more about this item
Austerlitz

Austerlitz

by Sebald, W G

W. G. Sebald taught at the University of East Anglia in Norwich, England, for thirty years, becoming Professor of European Literature in 1987, and from 1989 to 1994 was the first Director of the British Centre for Literary Translation. His three previous books won several international awards, including the L.A. Times Book Award for fiction, the Berlin Literature Prize and the Literatur Nord Prize. W. G. Sebald was killed in a car accident at age 57 in December 2001.
Madame Bovary

Madame Bovary

by Flaubert, Gustave

Madame Bovary is Gustave Flaubert's first novel and considered his masterpiece. The story focuses on a doctor's wife, Emma Bovary, who has adulterous affairs and lives beyond her means in order to escape the banalities and emptiness of provincial life. Though the basic plot is rather simple, even archetypal, the novel's true art lies in its details and hidden patterns.
Hopscotch

Hopscotch

by Cortazar, Julio

JULIO CORTAZAR was born in 1914 in Belgium to Argentinean parents, grew up in Buenos Aires, and moved to Paris in 1951. An acclaimed and influential novelist, short-story writer, poet, playwright, and essayist, he was also a human rights advocate and amateur jazz musician. He died in Paris in 1984.
Demian

Demian

by Hesse, Hermann

Demian: The Story of Emil Sinclair's Youth is a bildungsroman by Hermann Hesse, first published in 1919; a prologue was added in 1960. Demian was first published under the pseudonym "Emil Sinclair", the name of the narrator of the story, but Hesse was later revealed to be the author. The novel was written in just three weeks.
The Time Of the Hero

The Time Of the Hero

by Vargas Llosa, Mario

Quo Vadis

Quo Vadis

by Sienkiewicz, Henryk

Odyssey

Odyssey

by Kazantzakis, Nikos