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Translation Books & Ephemera


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    €450.00

    Goreshti tsvietarnitsi: izbrani poemi i piesni [Serres chaudes: selected poems and songs]. Translated from the French by Geo Milev.; Knigi za bibliofili, [Books for bibliophiles] 4 by Maeterlinck, Maurice and Geo Milev

    Stara Zagora: Knigoizdatelstvo Vezni, 1920. Octavo (20 × 15 cm). Original decorative dust-wrapper, in imitation of pochoir, over blind wrappers; 40, [2] pp. Light wear and abrasions to the fragile wrappers; owner inscription to title; some foxing throughout; old bookstore stamp to rear wrapper. First Bulgarian translation of the Belgian Symbolist poet's poetry, selections from the 1889 collection "Serres chaudes" [Hothouses] and the 1896 volume "Douze Chansons." Translated, and with a two-page preface, by Geo Milev (1895-1925), the major Bulgarian literary critic and expressionist poet. Milev began his career as a translator and popularizer of Western poets and philosophers (such as Friedrich Nietzsche). He became a leading popularizer of modernist and avant-garde tendencies in Bulgaria and, by the early 1920s, his own work became increasingly political. In 1924 he began publishing the leftist journal "Plamak" (Flame). This is the fourth volume of a series titled "Books for bibliophiles" published by Milev's "Vezni" publishing house in the town of Stara Zagora. Not in Jacono. KVK, OCLC show a single copy at UCL.


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    €250.00

    Kam spěje Anglie? [Where Is Britain Going?] by Trockij, Lev and Bohumil Mathesius, translator

    Prague: Komunistické nakladatelství a knihkupectví v Praze, 1926. Octavo (19 × 14.2 cm). Original decorative wrappers; 173, [2] pp. Spine cocked; wrappers lightly discolored; still about very good. First and only separate edition in Czech of Trotsky's work, translated by Bohumil Mathesius, a prolific translator from a number of European languages, who also rendered the works of Aleksandr Blok and Vladimir Mayakovsky in Czech. It was first published in 1925 in Moscow, with US and British translations in 1925 and 1926 respectively. The rear wrappers feature a list of other publications by this important communist publisher, much of the output of which was confiscated throughout the 1930s. Among them works by Bukharin, Marx, Lenin, Plekhanov, Stalin, Trotsky, and Kamenev. KVK, OCLC only show the copy at the Czech National Library.


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    €750.00

    Armianskie poety [Armenian poets] by Sharti, S. Ia. [pseudonym of Sergei Iakimovich Mikirtumov]

    Tbilisi: self-published (Tipografiia, 1917. Octavo (19 × 15 cm). Original blue printed wrappers; 123, [4] pp. Light soil to wrappers; tiny tear to front wrapper; text evenly toned due to stock; still very good. Second edition of these translations of Armenian poetry from the seventeenth to the early twentieth century was assembled and translated into Russian by the poet Sergey Yakimovich Mikirtumov, who published under the pseudonym S. Ia. Sharti. Published at the height of the Armenian genocide (1915-1917), a systematic extermination of Armenians on the territory of the Ottoman Empire, the translation was likely an attempt to bring attention to the rich cultural history of Armenians. The collection starts with the poetic songs of so-called Ashiks (Ashkhs) - the seventeenth-century Nahapet Kuchak, eighteenth-century Sayat-Nova and nineteenth-century Jivani, national poet singers who, much like the French troubadours, often lived at court and accompanied their original compositions with a stringed instrument called saz. The collection also includes poetry of the nineteenth-century nationalist poets Mikayel Nalbandian, Petros Durian, as well as a number of young twentieth-century poets, such as Vahan Terian and Akop Akopian. The feminist poet Shushanik Kurghinian, credited with the birth of Feminist poetry in Armenia is also included in the collection. Little is known about the translator, who seems to have published two collections of his own poetry "Zhaloby serdtsa" (Laments of the heart) in 1906 and "Izbrannye stikhotvorenia 1905-1910" (Selected poems 1905-1910) in 1911 before launching into this translation project. The first edition appeared in Saratov in 1916. Turchinskii, p. 740. KVK, OCLC only show a copy of the 1917 edition at Bayerische Staatsbibliothek.


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    €600.00

    Amerikanskie milliardery. S 16 portretami i prilozheniem stat'i Andr'iu Karnegi: Predubezhdeniia protiv trestov. Perevod s frantsuzskago pod redaksiei A. E. Ianovskago [American billionaires. With sixteen portraits and, as a supplement, Andre Carnegie's essay, "Popular Illusions about Trusts." Translated from the French and edited by A. E. Ianovskii] by Norven, A. de (e.g. L. de Norvins, pseudonym); Andrew Carnegie

    St. Petersburg: XX Vek, 1902. Octavo (18.3 × 12.3 cm). Contemporary beige cloth; [4], 379 pp. Sixteen photographic portraits on separate leaves; numerous decorative head pieces and vignettes. Original wrappers perished; stamp of a non-existing lending library to title; else about very good. First and only edition of this sensationalist account of the life of American billionaires of the Gilded Age, supposedly written by a French journalist with exclusive access to the likes of Carnegie, Rockefeller, Vanderbilt, and Morgan. The supposed author -- according to the preface a former contributor to the journal 'Revue de revues' -- is likely a pseudonym; the original French was published as "Les milliardaires américains" around 1899, by one L. de Norvins. The goal of the book is to expose the sheer power and inherent corruptness of the American financial and industrial elites, as demonstrated through descriptions of their business practices, but also their daily lives and intrigues. Chapters are devoted to the "first four hundred" and their families; to the daily life and psychology of the wives and daughters of America's richest; to their eccentricities and other gossip; as well as to their children and the system of lineage. Translated and edited by Abel' E. Ianovskii. The author is particularly critical of the practice of holding companies, or trusts, and the translator has here appended his Russian translation of Andrew Carnegie's essay, "Popular Illusions about Trusts" ("Predubezhdeniia protiv trestov"). Carnegie himself is the subject of the short chapter, "The Steel King." Complete, with all sixteen portraits. Rare; not traced through KVK or OCLC.


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    $175.00

    Jen zem (Rien que la terre) [Nothing but the earth] by Morand, Paul and Jarmila Fastrova, translator

    1928. Prague: Václav Petr, 1928. Octavo (23 × 13.8 cm). Original pictorial wrappers by C. Bouda; 116, [1] pp. Very good, in protective mylar. A Czech translation of a fictional travelogue, written in 1926 by the French modernist Paul Morand (1888-1976). The photo-montage cover design was done by the celebrated graphic artist Cyril Bouda (1901-1984) in the style of Czech poetism, as a "picture poem." First introduced by the artist Karel Teige and poet Vitseslav Nezval in 1923, this avant-garde movement dominated Czech book design throughout the interwar period. KVK, OCLC show copies at Toronto, Boulder, BnF and Dresden.


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    €600.00

    Doktrina fashizma s prilozheniem Khartii truda [The Doctrine of Fascism appended with the "Labour Charter of 1927"] by Mussolini, Benito; Novikov, V. N., translator

    Paris: Vozrozhdenie, 1938. Octavo (19 × 14 cm). Original printed wrappers; 60, [2] pp. Unopened and uncut. Light foxing to front wrapper, still very good or better. First edition. First Russian translation of Benito Mussolini's programmatic essay on fascism, originally published in the Italian Encyclopedia of Science in 1932. A Russian fascist Viacheslav Novikov translated the text and wrote an introduction to this edition, in which he glosses the rising interest in fascism within the Russian white émigré community, starting with the attempted formation of a Russian fascist party in 1924 in Serbia, under the leadership of Prof. D.P. Ruzskii and Gen. P.V. Cherskii. A Russian fascist party was finally formed within the White émigré community in Manchuria in 1931. Novikov also discusses the publication of the fascist journal "Klich" (Cry) in Belgium in which he seems to have published under the pseudonym Verista. Viacheslav Novikov (-1966) was a St. Petersburg lawyer, later a legal counsel to Aleksander Kolchak during his tenure as the head of the White government in Siberia (1918-1920). From 1920 onward, Novikov lived in emigration in Paris. In 1926 he published a monograph "Fascism. Notes on Italian Fascism", with this translation as his second major contribution to the development of Russian fascist thought. KVK, OCLC show copies at Amherst, NYPL, UNC, Ohio, Wisconsin, Stanford and the British Library.


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    €1,000.00

    Geschichte des Pugatschew'schen Aufruhrs. Aus dem Russischen des Alexander Puschkin von H. Brandeis [History of the Pugachev Rebellion; in the original: Istoriia Pugachevskogo bunta] by Pushkin, Aleksandr Sergeevich (Puschkin, Puskin); Hirschmann Brandeis, translator

    Stuttgart: Johann Friedrich Cast, 1840. Octavo (19 × 11.5 cm). Publisher's printed green wrappers; XVIII, 258 pp. Light wear to wrapper edges; else about very good; an uncut and unopened copy. First German translation of Pushkin's controversial narrative of the peasant uprising led by the Don Cossack Emelian Ivanovich Pugachev (1742-1775), and almost certainly the first translation of the work into any language other than Russian. Pushkin's lively interest in this popular revolt inspired him to write both his better-known novel 'The Captain's Daughter' (1836) and this non-fiction account of the events. In addition to traveling to the site of the rebellion, Pushkin also studied archival documents related to the life of Pugachev, who was executed in Moscow. In spite of his initial reservations, Tsar Nicholas I granted Pushkin's request to publish the work, but required the title to be changed. It was published in 1834. Pushkin's considerable sympathy towards Pugachev and the impoverished masses scandalized numerous conservative critics. The translator, Hirschmann Brandeis (born 1793), was a German medical doctor and historian of medicine; this appears to be his only published book-length translation. With twenty pages of often highly subjective geographica, historical, and linguistic notes by the author, which form an interesting case study of the early reception of Russian culture in Germany. Among other things, Brandeis discusses the concept of "samozvanets" (usurpator), Russian hospitality, and gives a rather romantic account of the Cossacks. Interestingly, the year 1840 saw a number of translations of Pushkin's poetry and prose into German, a result of the growing interest in the poet after his untimely death. Cat. Russica P-1193. Quite scarce, especially in such excellent condition. In North America, KVK and OCLC only show copies at Columbia, Harvard, and Syracuse.


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    €300.00

    Rva [Rvach; The Grabber] by Erenburg, Ilja (Il'ia Ehrenburg)

    Prague: Aventinum, 1926. First Czech Edition. Octavo (20 × 14 cm). Original decorative wrappers; [6], 405, [2] pp. Signed by Erenburg, in pencil, on the front fly leaf, with the former owner's note in ink below indicating that this copy was signed after a lecture at the Um lecká beseda; a brief newspaper clipping about the lecture is also affixed to the leaf. Pages loose in wrappers (as issued). Wrappers worn and dust-soiled; small chips to the spine. Famous for The Thaw (1954), the novel which gave its name to the more liberal period following Stalin's death, Erenburg (1891- 1967) was a key figure in twentieth-century Russian culture. After enjoying a bohemian lifestyle in Paris in the 1910s, he returned to Russia following the October Revolution. Although he had been a member of the Communist Party previously, he initially rejected the Bolshevik takeover, but soon became a prominent Soviet journalist and translator who spent much of the 1920-30s in Western Europe, where he maintained close ties with avant-garde artists, émigré circles, and left-leaning writers, while serving as a Soviet press correspondent and cultural ambassador. Rvach, written in Paris in 1925, was one of three novels by Erenburg that addressed the socio-economic failures of the so- called New Economic Policy introduced in 1921. Too controversial for publication in the Soviet Union, the novel was instead issued in Paris in 1925 and translated into Czech the following year. This copy of the first Czech edition was signed by Erenburg during his stay in Prague in 1926, where avant-garde artist and critic Karel Teige invited him to lecture on the fate of Constructivism in the Soviet Union.


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    €150.00

    Hlos hrudy [Voice of the soil] by Lysohorsky, Óndra (Erwin Goj, 1905-1989)

    Prague: Družstevní Práce, 1935. Octavo (19.8 × 12 cm). Original embossed ochre cloth, orange dust wrappers by Ladislav Sutnar; [8], 115, [2] pp. Frontis drawing by Ferdiš Duša. Light sun-tanning to spine; else very good or better in very good dust jacket. [Pioneer of "Lach" Literature] Scarce third book of poems by this Silesian poet, who became famous for defending the rights of speakers of the so-called Lach dialects, a group of dialects situated between the Czech and Polish languages. Although Lysohorsky grew up speaking German and initially published in German, he later refused to write in standard Czech, publishing numerous works in Lachian. A scholar of Slavic studies, he systematized the grammar of Lachian and created the first published works using this dialect. Claiming persecution by Czech authorities, who refused to recognize Lachian as an independent language, he later asked Stalin to intercede on his behalf. He spent time in the Soviet Union and Boris Pasternak even translated several volumes of his poetry. Because of his controversial status in Czechoslovakia, his books were later banned and removed from libraries and the book trade. Nevertheless, because he was a poet of the oppressed and of the working class, Lysohorsky found acclaim with the Czechoslovak interwar leftist literary and artistic scene. This book also serves as an introduction to the Lach dialect, with a long dictionary, and introduction to pronunciation, and a note that the orthography and grammar is based on an 1898 work by Jan Loriš. Binding by František Muzika, typographic design and wrappers by Ladislav Sutnar. Outside the Czech Republic, KVK, OCLC show copies at Bamberg and Regensburg University, Herder Institut, Oxford, UCL, and Urbana-Champaign.


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    €500.00

    Portretnaia galereia mongol'skoi dinastii [The portrait gallery of the Mongolian dynasty] by Baranov, Ippolit Gavrilovich

    Harbin: Club of Natural Science and Geography, 1941. Quarto (26 × 19 cm). Original printed wrappers. pp. 101-106, eleven black and white illustrations on six leaves of plates. Old vertical creases; small nick to lower right corner; alse about very good. Rare Russian-language offprint from "News of the Club of Natural Science and Geography", in which Baranov presents photographic reproductions of little-known portraits of Yuan dynasty Mongol leaders, previously held at a Beijing palace. He also provides a Russian translation of the Chinese and Mongolian text accompanying these images, with his own annotations and clarifications. Among the Mongol leaders depicted are Genghis Kahn, Ogedei Khan, Kublai Khan as well as some of their wives. Baranov (1886-1972) was a translator and Sinologist who taught Chinese language, ethnography, history and literature to employees of the Russian Far Eastern Railway and various universities in Manchuria. He authored over 150 works within his areas of specialization. In 1958 he immigrated to the Soviet Union, where he settled in Almaty, Kazachstan. KVK, OCLC only show the copies at Staatsbibliothek zu Berlin and Stanford Unviersity.


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    €100.00

    Tony úzkosti i spočinutí, jež vyloudili ruští básníci na lyře náboženské a jež v souzvuk s českou řečí uvedl Frant. Klein [Sounds of distress and repose, elicited by Russian poets on the religious lyre, and brought into accord with the Czech language by Frant. Klein]. Wrapper title: Tony úzkosti i spočinutí: náboženské verše ruských básníků [Sounds of distress and repose: religious verse by Russian poets]. Privately printed by Klein, František, editor and translator

    Nový Jičín: Kryl a Scotti, 1932. Octavo (23 × 17 cm). Publisher's printed wrappers; 30, [2] pp. Frontis drawing by R. Michalik. Very good. Bibliophile edition of Klein's translations of Russian poems, primarily of religious or mystical nature and dated to the nineteenth century. Among the authors are Surikov, Maikov, Kozlov, Koltsov, Zhukovsky, Pushkin, Filaret, Khomyakov, A. K. Tolstoy, I. S. Nikitin, and several others. Printed in a run of 280 copies, of which nos. 1-160 were given to attendees of the fifth gathering of Moravian Bibliophiles on May 15, 1932. This is copy no. 105. Sáňka 5170. Outside the Czech Republic, KVK and OCLC only show the copy at Bayerische Staatsbibliothek.


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    €150.00

    Stoprocentní vlastenec: historie patriotova [100%: The Story of a Patriot].; Lidové romány, sv. 4 by Sinclair, Upton

    Prague: Vydalo Kommunistické knihkupectví a nakl. R. Rejman, 1921. Octavo (19.5 × 13 cm). Original pictorial wrappers; 271, [1] pp. Frontis portrait of the author. Very good. First Czechoslovak appearance of Sinclair's novel (first published 1920). An earlier translation, by Jan Jiří Kárník, also appeared in New York, in the year the original was published. With an anonymous three-page introduction, presumably by the unidentified translator. The drawn cover illustration is also not attributed. The rear wrappers feature a list of other publications by this important communist publisher, much of the output of which was confiscated throughout the 1920-1930s. Among them other works by Sinclair, Clara Zetkin, G. Zinov'ev, Lenin, and Bogdanov's "Red Star" in Czech. Outside the Czech Republic, KVK, OCLC only show the copies at Kansas and Urbana Champaign.


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    €380.00

    Liudi - idioty. Budut li Liudi kak Bogi [L'Homme Stupide. Will Men Be Like Gods] by Charles Richet, Owen Francis Dudley and G. A. Gorin (translator)

    Shanghai, 1918. Octavo (26.5 × 19.5 cm). Original printed wrappers; 98 pp. Wrappers toned and foxed; text somewhat brittle; laid-in errata slip. A curious book that joins two works in Russian translation, "L'Homme Stupide" (1919) by Charles Richet (1850-1935), the French physiologist who won the Nobel Prize in 1913 and was also known as a spiritualist and parapsychologist. The second work, "Will Men Be Like Gods?" (1924) was written by the English priest Owen Francis Dudley (1882-1952). One can only presume that the texts were chosen by this Russian émigré in an attempt to explain the still relatively recent Bolshevik Revolution to his compatriots, although Richet's text, in particular, is full of extreme vitriol against humanity, which he dubs "Homo stultissimus" for such "idiocies" as self-mutilation, alcohol, venereal diseases and interracial marriage. Nothing is known about the translator. KVK, OCLC only show the copy at UNC Chapel Hill.


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    €280.00

    Rukovodstvo dlia nebol'shikh bibliotek. Perevod s 3 izdania, s ob"iasneniiami i dopolneniiami [Hints to Small Libraries. Translated from the third edition, with explanations and additions by the translator] by Plummer, Mary Wright (1856-1916); Sergei I. Povarnin, translator

    St. Petersburg: Tipografiia I. Kh. Usmanov, 1905. Octavo (19.5 × 13.3 cm). Contemporary green cloth, title in red to spine and front board; [4], 84, [1] pp. About very good; boards lightly soiled; pencil signature to title. First and only Russian edition of this guidebook for small libraries, authored by the prominent American librarian and second female president of the American Library Association (1915-1916). Plummer studied at Wellesley College, as well as under Melvil Dewey at Columbia, later serving at the Pratt Institute Free Library, where she developed a library studies course and ultimately became head of the library. She also authored 'Training for Librarianship', another guide for future librarians and held a range of leadership positions in her field. This Russian translation is based on the third edition of her work (Brooklyn, NY, self-published, 1902), but has been liberally altered by the author, both stylistically, and to account for the differences between Russia and America. For instance, while Plummer simply recommends the Dewey Decimal System, Povarnin begins by mentioning that a simple alphabetical categorization is more widely used in Russia's often very small lending libraries. In order to encourage Russian librarians to adopt the Dewey system, however, Povarnin includes what he refers to as the first attempt to modify the Dewey categories for Russian use. From its first discussion in Russia around 1895, the Dewey system remained controversial and it was not until the early 1910s, and especially after October Revolution, that the decimal system was widely applied. A second supplement also details the Cutter Expansive Classification system. Other chapters address matters such as cataloguing books, structuring and furnishing a library, reader registration and lending practices. The preface situates Plummer's guide in the existing literature in Russia, and refers to its great merits. Interestingly, the translator, writing in the revolutionary year of 1905, suggests a "new life" may soon begin for libraries. A scarce document on the history of librarianship in Russia, and the influence of American practices in its development: KVK, OCLC show a single copy, at the Polish National Library.


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    AUD $10.00

    Quarterly Essay Issue 52 [Found in Translation In Praise of a Plural World] by Jaivin, Linda

    Collingwood, Vic: Black Inc.. 2013. Large octavo size [16x24cm approx]. Very Good condition. 103 pages . 1st Edition. Softcover.


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    €200.00

    Američtí básníci. Anthologie. Překlady Arnošta Vaněčka [American poets. An anthology. Translations by Arnošt Vaněček]

    Prague: Odeon, 1929. Octavo (20 × 14 cm). Original decorative wrappers; 103 pp. About very good; very gentle crease to front wrapper. Uncommon anthology gathering translations of poems by Conrad Aiken, T. E. Hulme, Langston Hughes, Alfred Kreymborg, Amy Lowell, Ezra Pound, Edgar Lee Masters, Carl Sandburg, Wallace Stevens, Sara Teasdale and Carl Van Vechten. With a brief preface by the translator, and short biographical sketches. Published as no. 14 in the Malá edice Odeon (Small Odeon series), with front wrapper and title page designed by Czech avant-garde theoretician and book designer Karel Teige.


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    €400.00

    Rasskazy [Short stories]. Zapiski okhotnika [Notes of a Hunter]. Babushka [Grandmother]; Russkaia biblioteka [Russian library], 1-3 by Chekhov, Anton, Ivan Turgenev and Božena Němcova

    Prague: Melantrich, 1946. Octavos (17.5 × 13 cm). Original pictorial wrappers by Karel Teige; 208, [3]; 275, [I]; and 614, [6] pp. Light wear to wrappers, not affecting title text; one volume uncut and unopened; an attractive set. Complete set of these three Russian-language publications, featuring two Russian and one Czech literary classic. All three volumes were designed by Karel Teige (1900-1951), the outstanding Czech graphic designer, typographer and photographer. Teige was a formative member of the avant- garde movement "Devětsil" and served as a key conduit for West European avant-garde and surrealist tendencies to the Czech Republic in the interwar period, in addition to his own prolific work as an editor, graphic designer, and theoretician. Outside of the Czech Republic, KVK, OCLC only show volumes 1 and 2 at Oxford and a copy of volume 3 at Ljubljana.


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    €175.00

    Poteriannyi million [The Missing Million]. Translated by T.A.I.; Biblioteka sovremennykh pisatelei [Library of contemporary authors] by Wallace, Edgar

    Riga: Izdatel'stvo "Khronos", 1926. Octavo (20 × 14 cm). Original pictorial card wrappers; [2], 136 pp. Wrappers dust-soiled; small nick to lower spine end; a bit of wear to overlapping wrapper foreedge; overall a very good copy. The first translation into Russian of Wallace's 1923 novel. In 1929, at least ten further translations of works by Wallace appeared in Riga, in various publishing houses. About the present one, James Fraser writes, "Khronos publishing houe and its elusive publisher, Georg Leopoldovich Birkgan, managed to bring a bit of life to the graphics of his publishing venture through the choice of cover artists, notably Raimunds Sisko, and others who are unfortunately not credited." The publishing house was short-lived and ceased operation after publishing nine titles. See Fraser, Publishing and Book Design in Latvia, 1919-1945 (2014), on further examples of Wallace translations in interwar Riga. KVK, OCLC show only a single copy, at UC Los Angeles.


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    $4,000.00

    The Colloquies, or Familiar Discourses of Desiderius Erasmus of Roterdam, Rendered into English by Erasmus, Desiderius; "H.M. Gent" (translator, Henry More or Henry Munday)

    London: E.T. and R.H. for H. Brome, B. Tooke, and T. Sawbridge, 1671. First edition in English of the complete Colloquia Familiaria of Erasmus, first published in 1518 and expanded by Erasmus over the next fifteen years, a lively collection of Latin dialogues that found a readership far beyond the Renaissance schoolroom. Originally intended to model colloquial conversation for students of Latin, the dialogues feature pointed, free-thinking exchanges on modern political, religious, and philosophical questions. In "Of the Abbot and Learned Woman," an ignorant abbot tries and fails to get the better of the classically educated Magdalia, a character almost certainly based on Thomas More's eldest daughter: "I think thou art some sophistress, thou protest so wittily." Magdalia: "I will not tell thee, what I think thou art." And later: "I have often heard it usually spoken, that a wise woman is twice a fool." Magdalia: "Indeed it useth to be said so, but by fools." The Colloquia Familiaria was widely read and debated across Europe, drawing immediate notice for its anticlerical satire: "its influence on the dialogues of Reformation Germany and Tudor England is a critical commonplace" (Zlatar, Reformation Fictions, 11). The original purpose of the Colloquies as a text for teaching Latin postponed its direct translation; this first complete English edition was published more than 150 years after the work's first appearance. The edition opens with a short life of Erasmus, and concludes with the first appearance in English of De utilitate colloquiorum, Erasmus's 1526 defense of the Colloquies, published after the Sorbonne condemned the book for impiety. In response, Erasmus makes a case for the educational value of his dialogues' humor: "I cannot tell whether any thing be learned more successfully than that which is learned in playing." Despite his efforts, the Colloquies would remain on the Papal Index of banned books through the end of the nineteenth century. Wing E-3190; PMM 53. A very good copy of a humanist landmark, in a handsome contemporary binding. Octavo, measuring 6.5 x 4.25 inches: [8], 555, [1]. Contemporary Cambridge-style full speckled calf, boards ruled and ornamented in blind, raised bands, red morocco spine label lettered and decorated in gilt, top edge stained. Engraved frontispiece portrait of Erasmus. Final leaf, containing second page of bookseller catalogue, excised. Joints and spine head expertly repaired; evidence of bookplate removal on front pastedown; effaced signature on title page; some running titles shaved.


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    €100.00

    The Russians Said It First: A Heritage of Proverbs selected and translated by Simeon Aller by Aller, Simeon and Nikolai Remisoff, illustrator

    Los Angeles: The Ward Ritchie Press, 1963. Hardcover. Remisoff, Nicolai (Re-My). Octavo (20.5 × 14 cm). Original illustrated cloth, unclipped dustjacket in mylar sleeve; v-viii, [1], 137 pp. With a preface by Upton Sinclair and fourteen leaves of black-and-white illustrations by Re-My (Nicolai Remisoff). Signed and inscribed by the author on the front fly leaf: "To Selia and Frank with Best Wishes Simeon." Light foxing to top and side edge; else a very attractive copy. With a typically idiosyncratic preface by Upton Sinclair, which concludes: "There are seven hundred proverbs in this book, so you will wish to pick out those which seem most striking. Read, mark, and inwardly digest them; for the Russians are too human and have suffered and thought in the same mysterious world. The airplane has made us neighbors forever." Illustrated by Nikolai Remizov (Re-Mi, or Re-My) an important Russian graphic designer, illustrator, and painter (1887-1975). In the years before the Revolution, Re-Mi was one of the leading artists of the satirical journal "Satirikon" and "Novyi Satirikon." He is also well-known for his illustrations for Kornei Chukovsky's children's tale "Krokodil" ("The Crocodile"). After emigrating in 1918, he settled briefly in Paris before moving to the US, where he was active as a set designer in Hollywood for some time after 1939.


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    €120.00

    Moi zhurnal dlia rasshireniia i uglubleniia poznanii po frantsuzskomu iazyku [My journal for expanding my knowledge of the French language]. Complete in twelve issues, each with a separate vocabulary supplement by Manshtein, S. A., editor

    St. Petersburg: S. A. Manshtein, 1912. Octavos (20.5 × 14.5 cm). Original staple-stitched self-wrappers; varying pagination, ca. 32 pp. per issue. Laid into protective card cover with printed spine title and inserted into original brown card slipcase. Case lightly rubbed; some rust to staples; contents very good. An appealing complete set of these small "journals," which contain adapted news articles and literary texts for students of French. Each issue is accompanied by a separate supplement which contains vocabulary and translations into Russian. Attractively housed in the publisher's card slipcase. The author, Sergei Andreevich Manshtein (1861-1934) was a Russian teach of ancient and Romance languages, among others at the Imperial Lyceum in Tsarskoe Selo. See "Bibliografiia periodicheskikh izdanii Rossii 1901-1916", no. 4800. Not found in KVK, OCLC.


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    €950.00

    Zlatoe sochinenie Samuila Marokskago Ravvina Iudeiskago, zakliuchaiushcheesia v pis'makh k Isaaku, Ravvinu Kordubskomu, na oblichenie Iudeiskago zabluzhdeniia, v nabliudenii Moiseiskago zakona i ozhidanii Messii, iakoby eshche ne prishedshego. Perevod s Latinskago, vnov' ispravlennyi i nuzhnymi primechaniiami dopolnennyi v Kievopecherskoi Lavre [Golden Book of Rabbi Samuel of Morocco, consisting in letters to Isaac, Rabbi of Cordoba, on denouncing the Jewish error of observing the law of Moses in expectation of the Messiah, who supposedly has not yet arrived. Translated from the Latin, newly revised and supplied with necessary annotations at Kievo-Pecherskaia Lavra]. (Epistola Samuelis Maroccani ad Rabbi Isaacum) by Samuel, Marochitanus and Alfonsus Bonihominis, Bishop of Marrakech

    Moscow: V Sinodal'noi Tipografii, 1837. Third Edition. Octavo (21 × 14 cm). Contemporary marbled wrappers; VII, [2], 95 pp. Good or better; light soil to first two pages; binding starting; wrappers torn along spine. Third edition of this famous anti-Semitic treatise, a medieval Christian apologetic purportedly written in the eleventh century, but most likely written around 1339 by Alphonsus Bonihominis. "The author, a converted Jew, collects passages from the Old Testament in support of Christianity. The medieval Latin text which purports to be translated from an Arabic original by the Dominican friar Alphonsus Bonihominis in 1339, had a tremendous diffusion and was frequently printed and translated. Since no Arabic original of the text has ever been found, Steinschneider suggests that Alphonsus composed the letter himself, and merely imitated a different work by a Jew Samuel written in support of Islam after his conversion to that religion" (Paul Oskar Kristeller, Platonism, 188). Specifically, scholars assume Bonihominis was inspired by the Ifham al-Yahud by Samuel of Fez, another anti-Semitic treatise by a Jewish thinker who converted to Islam after seeing Muhammed in a prophetic dream. The work was first translated into Russian by hieromonk Varlaam (Glovatskii) and published in St. Petersburg in 1778; further editions followed in 1782, 1786, and 1827 before the present one, which is stated to be the third edition. All editions are scarce: KVK, OCLC show a copy of a 1827 edition at Brandeis and an 1855 copy at the NYPL.


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    €200.00

    Amerikánštiny: pestrá sbírka zajímavostí, momentky z amerického života, zvláštnosti za mořem i na pevnině... [Americanisms: a collection of curiosities, moments of life in America, and peculiarities overseas and on the continent...]

    Králové Pole: Nová eská myšlenka, 1914. Octavo (22 × 13.5 cm). Original staple-stitched pictorial wrappers; 80 pp. About very good; rust to staples; small nick to head of spine. A most curious digest of articles on American customs, daily life, history, and psychology, as seen through the eyes of this little-known publisher from Moravia. The book contains excerpts from the author's other works, with titles such as How to Make Money or A Guide to Success, or Czech Americanism. The texts focus on topics such as working life and sexuality in America, the psychology of success, and the secrets of financial and personal success. With a suitably grotesque depiction of Uncle Sam on the cover (not attributed). Not found in KVK or OCLC.


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    €225.00

    Ocel a dým [Smoke and steel] by Sandburg, Carl and František Gross, illustrator

    Prague: Družstvo Dílo, 1946. Octavo (23 × 17 cm). Original pictorial wrappers over blind wraps; 61, [2] pp. Three drawings in the text. Pages bound folded Chinese-style. Wrappers very lightly dust-soiled; still a very good copy. First edition of these Czech translations of Sandburg, an urban poet of great importance to the Skupina 42 group's interest in the city, translated by Jiří Kolář and Jiří Kotalík. With wrapper design and three illustrations by František Gross. This is copy 199 out of 1000 printed, signed by the translators on the colophon. KVK, OCLC only show the copy at the Czech National Library.


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