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    $274.99

    THE LIFE AND SELECTED WRITINGS OF THOMAS JEFFERSON Franklin Library by Jefferson, Thomas

    Franklin Center, Pennsylvania: Franklin Library. 1982. First Edition; First Printing. Hardcover. Very Good+, Leather Bound. Book accented in 22kt gold. Printed on archival paper with gilded edges. The endsheets are of moire fabric with a silk ribbon page marker. Smyth sewing and concealed muslin joints to ensure the highest quality binding. This book is in full leather with hubbed spines. A limited edition published under the auspices of The American Revolution Bicentennial Administration. ; A Limited Edition.; 8vo 8" - 9" tall .


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    $3,500.00

    Jefferson's Religious Stance against Slavery by THOMAS JEFFERSON

    A Federal Era newspaper printing of Query XVIII from Notes on the State of Virginia , Jefferson's key section on slavery. Also George Washington's Letter to the Philadelphia Convention of the Episcopal Church, Proposed Revisions to the Bill of Rights, &c. Contains an extract from Jefferson's Notes on the State of Virginia. [THOMAS JEFFERSON]. Newspaper. The Massachusetts Centinel . Jefferson's Notes on the State of Virginia . August 29, 1789. Boston: Benjamin Russell. 4 pp. Excerpt: "The whole commerce between master and slave is a perpetual exercise of the most boisterous passions, the most unremitting despotism on the one part, and degrading submission on the other.– Our children see this, and learn to imitate it. If a parent could find no other motive, either in his philanthropy or his self-love, for restraining the intemperance of passion towards his slave, it should always be a sufficient one that his child is present. But generally it is not sufficient.– The parent storms, the child looks on, catches the lineaments of wrath, puts on the same airs in the circle of smaller slaves, gives a loose to his worst of passions – and thus nursed, educated, and daily exercised in tyranny, cannot but be stamped by it with odious peculiarities. The man must be a prodigy who can retain his manners and morals undepraved by such circumstances. And with what execration should the statesman be loaded, who permitting one half the citizens to trample on the rights of the other, transforms those into despots, and these into enemies ; destroys the morals of one part, and the amor patriae of the other. With the morals of the people, their industry also is destroyed ; for, in a warm climate, no man will labour for himself who can make another labour for him. And can the liberties of a nation be thought secure, when we have removed their only firm basis, a conviction that these liberties were the gift of God ? That they are not to be violated but with his wrath ? Indeed, I tremble for my country when I reflect that God is just : That his justice cannot sleep forever : That considering numbers, nature, and natural means only, an exchange of situation is among possible events, and that it may become probable by supernatural interference. The Almighty has no attribute which can take side with us in such a contest. But it is impossible to be temperate, and to pursue this subject through the various considerations of policy, of morals, of history natural and civil. We must be contented to hope, they will force their way into every one's mind. I think a change already very perceptible since the origin of the present revolution. The spirit of the master is abating, that of the slave rising from the dust, his condition molifying, the way, I hope, preparing, under the auspices of Heaven, for a total emancipation , and that this is disposed, in the order of events, to be with the consent of the masters, rather than by their extirpation." Also in this issue is Washington's August 19, 1789 letter to the Philadelphia Convention of the Protestant Episcopal Church in New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, and South Carolina. "It affords edifying prospects indeed, to see christians of different denominations dwell together in more charity, and conduct themselves…with a more christian-like spirit, than ever they have done in any former age, or in any other nation. / I received with the greater satisfaction your congratulations on the establishment of the new Constitution of Government, because, I believe its mild, yet efficient operations, will tend to remove every remaining apprehension … And because the moderation, patriotism and wisdom of the present Federal Legislature, seem to promise the restoration of order and our ancient virtues ; the extension of genuine Religion, and the consequent advancement of our respectability abroad, and of our substantial happiness at home." Reports on three additional amendments being proposed to the Bill of Rights and voted down by a majority – "To take from Congress the power of direct Taxation;" "respecting Titles of Nobility;" "and another against establishing Mercantile Companies with exclusive privileges." [The House of Representatives had approved a 'first draft' of seventeen amendments to the Constitution on August 24, 1789, which was then sent to the Senate for concurrence, and by September 25, had been condensed and pared down to twelve, ten of which became our Bill of Rights.] "An Act to Establish an Executive Department, to be denominated the Department of War," & "An Act for the Establishment and support of Light-Houses…and Publick Piers," both signed in fancy script type by Washington. The story of a captured African Prince's bow and quiver making their way to America with him, and ultimately being used by his master's wife to defend her home from the British, is related with news of the bow being presented to Charles Willson Peale's Museum. Condition Very good


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    $7.95

    Jeffersonianism and the American Novel by Jones, Howard Mumford

    New York: Teachers College Press. Very Good in Very Good- dust jacket; Orange cloth hardcover with gilt . titles; dust jacket 2 closed tears at top of front panel; clean pages; . tight binding.. 1966. First Edition; 1st Printing. Hardcover. "...the suthor discusses salient trends in American fiction.... ; Studies in Culture & Communication Series; 8vo 8" - 9" tall; 77 pages .


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    $3,500.00

    Genêt Offers a Rather Inadequate Explanation of the Citizen Genêt Affair by EDMOND-CHARLES GENÊT

    EDMOND-CHARLES GENÊT. Autograph Letter Signed in French, to Secretary of State Thomas Jefferson, July 9, 1793, Philadelphia. 2 pp., 8 x 13¼ in. Historical Background Genêt wrote this letter regarding the 1793 Genêt Affair precipitated by the capture of British vessel Little Sarah , offering a riveting account of this erstwhile emissary's explanation of his actions. "Citizen Genêt," as he was known by American Francophiles, was charged with encouraging France's former ally, the newly liberated United States, to repay its debts. Another more dubious diplomatic goal was to ensure support for France's war with Britain, either through obtaining credit or supplies in the United States, or as Genêt would attempt, by entangling the new nation in the conflict. Sometime in the spring of 1793, the French frigate Embuscade commandeered the British vessel Little Sarah and dragged it into Philadelphia. The ship was there outfitted as a French privateer and renamed La Petite Démocrate . On June 22, the Washington administration began to investigate the disturbing claims coming from the nation's capital. Thomas Jefferson prevented a public relations disaster by dispersing a local militia that had mustered in response to fears that La Petite Démocrate would leave Philadelphia without presidential approval. Genêt wrote this letter in the middle of the Affair in response to Jefferson's request for further information. Jefferson and Genêt met in person just two days before this letter was written, discussing some of the same points later addressed in written form. Jefferson chose to regard Genêt's equivocal statements as a promise that La Petite Démocrate would not sail until President George Washington returned to consider the case. On the following day, July 8, Jefferson met with Secretary of the Treasury Alexander Hamilton and Secretary of War Henry Knox. Hamilton and Knox wanted to place a battery manned by militia on Mud Island, seven miles below Philadelphia, to prevent the ship from leaving the Delaware River. Jefferson dissented from the opinion. Genêt then had La Petite Démocrate moved to Chester, below the proposed fortifications on Mud Island. In this letter, Genêt explains that the ship, which featured a copper hull, four cannon, and catapults, could employ many stranded French sailors who were " exposed to danger " in Philadelphia. " I formed the opinion that the acquisition of this vessel would be advantageous to the Republic ," Genêt blithely writes. Washington returned on July 11 and assembled his cabinet on July 12. Prior to the cabinet meeting, Jefferson received Genêt's assurance that La Petite Démocrate would remain in Philadelphia until further notice. The cabinet decided to obtain counsel from the justices of the U.S. Supreme Court on questions regarding American neutrality, and Jefferson asked Genêt to keep La Petite Démocrate from sailing until the justices had time to respond. A few days later, Genêt dispatched La Petite Démocrate to attack British shipping in the Atlantic, in clear violation of his pledge to Jefferson. On August 1, the cabinet agreed to request Genêt's recall as French ambassador, fewer than three months after he had arrived in the capital. Complete Translation from French Note pertaining to la Petite Démocrate captured by frigate Embuscade heretofore The Little Sarah that Citizen Genet has had armed on behalf of the Republic and whose launching was opposed by some. *1 British property and equipped by the enemy with 4 cannon and several catapults and other arms. *2 her rigging and her masts in good condition Philadelphia, July 9, 1793, 2nd year 2 of the Republic Lieutenant Commandant General to Mr Jefferson Sir, You have asked me for details about the Brigantine la Petite Démocrate, previously called the Little Sarah, which is at this moment armed and ready to leave from Delaware. This warship,*1 Sir, was captured by the Republic's frigate Embuscade and sent to Philadelphia. The construction was elegant and solid, her hull lined with copper, and her molding superior.*2 Based on the Embuscade's captain's report and that provided by other knowledgeable sailors, I formed the opinion that *3 I have entrusted the command to Citizen [ Annot ?] , an ensign not in the service of the Navy of the Republic *4 of the Republic and of my specific instructions, as soon as it is ready. the acquisition of this vessel would be advantageous to the Republic, and this consideration, along with my wish to procure employment for a rather large number of French sailors here who are exposed to the dangers that often accompany idleness and misery, made me determined to acquire her on behalf of the State. I had her repaired right away. I outfitted her with more cannon that were on board of 4 French vessels*3 and I will appoint her better [pending] a letter from the Executive Council.*4 I have to limit myself, Sir, to relating these facts which are not susceptible to advance discussion by me, nor will give rise to any by your government. Edmond-Charles Genêt , also known as Citizen Genêt (1763-1834) was born in Versailles and was a prodigy who could read seven languages by age twelve. At age eighteen, he became a court translator. Sent to St. Petersburg in 1788, Empress of Russia Catherine II expelled him from the imperial court in 1789. In 1793, he was dispatched to the United States to promote American support of France in its wars with Great Britain and Spain. Genêt commissioned four privateering vessels, and his activities in the United States threatened American neutrality. When he met President George Washington in Philadelphia, he asked for a reversal of American neutrality in favor of France. When Secretary of State Thomas Jefferson objected to his actions, Genêt protested. Washington ultimately sent him a letter of complaint on the unusually united advice of both Jefferson and Secretary of the Treasury Alexander Hamilton. Genêt's reply was obstinate, and Washington asked the French government to recall Genêt. Fearing the guillotine if he returned, Genêt asked for asylum in the United States and moved to New York. There, he married the daughter of Governor George Clinton and lived out Alexis de Toqueville's dream of the life of the American farmer until his death some forty years later.


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    Jefferson through the Fog. An Address Delivered at Monticello on 13 April 1959 by Wiggins, James Russell

    Charlottesville: Thomas Jefferson Memorial Foundation, 1959. First edition. Stapled paper wrappers. A fine copy. As new.. 18 pp. 16mo.


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    $2,000.00

    In His State of the Union Address, Thomas Jefferson Commends Lewis and Clark for Their Successful Explorations by THOMAS JEFFERSON. LEWIS AND CLARK

    THOMAS JEFFERSON. [LEWIS AND CLARK]. Newspaper. Connecticut Courant . Hartford, Conn., December 10, 1806. 4 pp, 12½ x 20½ in. After purchasing the Louisiana Territory in 1803, President Jefferson sent his former personal secretary, Meriwether Lewis and Army officer William Clark to explore the huge tract of land. In his December 2, 1806, State of the Union address, Jefferson praised the expedition's success. His address, in full on page 3, includes this important paragraph: Excerpt: " The expedition of Messrs. Lewis and Clarke, for exploring the river Missouri, and the best communication from that to the Pacific Ocean, has had all the success which could have been expected. They have traced the Missouri nearly to its source, descended the Columbia to the Pacific Ocean....and it is but justice to say that Messrs. Lewis and Clarke, and their brave companions, have, by this arduous service, deserved well of their country. " Meriwether Lewis (1774 - 1809) was best known for leading, along with William Clark, the expedition that explored the Louisiana Purchase from 1804-1806. He was a largely self-taught naturalist and outdoorsman, and soldier in the Army's First Infantry Regiment. In 1801, he joined Thomas Jefferson's staff as his personal secretary. In 1804, Jefferson picked his old friend and fellow Virginian to lead the transcontinental expedition. Jefferson named him Governor of the Louisiana Territory in 1807. Lingering effects of wounds suffered returning from the expedition dogged him until he died under mysterious circumstances, apparently by suicide, in 1809. William Clark (1770 – 1838) joined the Kentucky territory's volunteer militia and fought in the Northwest Indian War in 1789. He was promoted to captain in 1790, and played a decisive role in the Battle of Fallen Timbers, victory in which brought an end to the entire war in 1794. He is best known for his role leading, along with Meriwether Lewis, the expedition exploring the Louisiana Purchase in 1804. He was later governor of the Missouri territory in 1812, and Superintendant of Indian Affairs in 1822. Condition Very good. Disbound. Subscriber's name inked on front page.


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    $14.00

    2008 THOMAS JEFFERSON RETURNS Letters Received and Recorded by Jaccaci, August Thayer

    Unity Scholars. Good+. 2008. First Edition. Softcover. Signed by author on second title-page. Wrinkling to the spine. Edgewear to the covers. Owner's inscription on first title-page. Most pages printed one side only. ; 4to 11" - 13" tall; 140 pages; Signed by Author .


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    $2,750.00

    Madison, Monroe, Talleyrand and Jefferson's "Crimes" and "back door pimps" in Negotiations to Buy Florida From Spain by KILLIAN K. VAN RENSSELAER

    " Randolphs charges agt. Jefferson are that he recommended one thing in his private message, which he counteracted by his 'back door pimps' and obtained 2 Millions of Dollars to give Talleyrand, to open the door with Spain for Negotiation //- Also, for having nominated Gen.l Wilkinson Governor of upper Louisiana - blending the military with the civil. " " R [andolph]- remarked in a reply to B [idwell], that he considered the 'half formed opinion, from the half bred Attorney, as not worthy an answer, unless it was to tell him, that he was like the rest of the political wood cocks, with which he associated, that had run their Bills in the mud, and therefore wished not to see, nor to be seen.' " KILLIAN K. VAN RENSSELAER. Autograph Letter Signed, April 2, 1806. 4 pp. Historical Background On December 3, 1805, Thomas Jefferson sent his fifth annual message to Congress. In that document, he proposed strengthening the militia and the Navy in response to the actions of European powers, including Spanish activities along the Florida-U.S. border. Three days later, Jefferson sent a confidential message to Congress recounting troubles with Spain arising from the Louisiana Purchase, and suggesting that France could arbitrate a boundary settlement over Spanish-held Florida. The House referred the president's secret message to a select committee chaired by John Randolph, whom the administration had unsuccessfully tried to oust as Ways and Means Committee chairman just a few days earlier. Meanwhile, Jefferson confided to Congressman Barnabas Bidwell and Secretary of the Treasury Albert Gallatin that he wanted Congress to pass a series of resolutions regarding Spanish offenses against the United States, after which Congress would secretly appropriate two million dollars to purchase Florida. Randolph convened the select committee on December 7, 1805, and Bidwell introduced a resolution authorizing the appropriation. Randolph believed that this reeked of intrigue and was thus a betrayal of Republican party principles; he quickly adjourned the committee. In subsequent meetings with Jefferson, Secretary of State James Madison, and Gallatin, Randolph stated that he would never support the secret appropriation. On January 11, 1806, the House voted down Randolph's report and three days later approved Bidwell's resolution. Randolph's split with the Jeffersonian Republicans was now permanent. On January 27, 1806, the U.S. Senate confirmed by a vote of 17 to 14 the appointment of the controversial General James Wilkinson as governor of the Louisiana Territory. Wilkinson would soon be implicated in the Burr conspiracy, in which former Vice President Aaron Burr apparently plotted the creation of an independent republic from lands of the Louisiana Territory, with himself to serve as president. Burr also may have planned to launch a military expedition against Spanish-held Mexico and incorporate that land within his empire. Transcript [in another hand] M.C [member of Congress] from New York, 1801-03 April 2. 1806 Gentlemen Randolphs charges agt. Jefferson are that he recommended one thing in his private message, which he counteracted by his "back door pimps" and obtained 2 Millions of Dollars to give Talleyrand, to open the door with Spain for Negotiation //- Also, for having nominated Gen.l Wilkinson Governor of upper Louisiana - blending the military with the civil. Also for having withheld the most important dispatches from Monroe until after the Secret Bill had passed, which if the house of Repre.s had, had before, the 2 Million Bill would not have been enacted into a Law. Against Madison, for making interest in favor of a douceur for Talleyrand and making the attempt to obtain the Money from the Treasury without an appropriation. Against Secy Smith for calling on merchants for their Notes which were discounted at Banks (on the good faith of Govert.) and the Monies appropriated without a Law. In a debate about taking off the injunction of secrecy, Randolph drove Bidwell, Crownenshield, Smilie, Findley, Thomas Eppes off the floor, by his usual irony & sarcasm. Bidwell is down, and cannot be brot' up to face Randolph in any thing, since R [andolph] remarked in a reply to B [idwell], that he considered the "half formed opinion, from the half bred Attorney, as not worthy an answer, unless it was to tell him that he was like the rest of the political wood cocks with which he (Bidwell) associated, that had run their Bills in the mud, and therefore wished not to see, nor to be seen." The inclosed paper contains our Minutes of the secret sittings. Randolph has said in his place , that the Minutes are garbled and incorrect , and has called on the state printer for a fair statement. If I can obtain an extra copy, I shall forward a true Bill . Thus you see, all is ready to be hove down. Jefferson is down, and the only question now is, who is to be next president! Yours in haste &c K VRensselaer Killian K. Van Rensselaer (1763-1845) was born in New York and attended Yale College. He studied law and was admitted to the bar in 1784. He served as a private secretary to General Philip Schuyler . He served as a Federalist in the U.S. House of Representatives from 1801 to 1811, when he returned to New York and the practice of law. This Killian was a descendant of Kiliaen Van Rensselaer (1586-1643), a diamond and pearl merchant from Amsterdam, who became a founder and director of the Dutch West India Company, and the only patroon successful in establishing American settlements. (Patroonships were large tracts of land with manorial rights granted to individuals to encourage Dutch colonization and settlement in New Netherland.) When the English assumed control and New Netherland became New York in the seventeenth century, Rensselaerswyck became an English manor containing all of the land around Albany, New York, along both sides of the Hudson River. Alexander Hamilton's mother-in-law was another Van Rensselaer descendant. John Randolph (1773-1833) was known as John Randolph of Roanoke to distinguish him from kinsmen. A diminutive man of mercurial temperament, he engaged in several duels, including one with Henry Clay that arose out of Randolph calling the Kentuckian a "blackleg" for his role in the controversial 1824 presidential election. From 1799 Randolph served intermittently in Congress until his death, including as a manager of impeachment proceedings against Judge John Pickering and Supreme Court Justice Samuel Chase. In 1806, Randolph broke with Jefferson and James Madison and headed an arch-conservative Congressional faction called "Tertium Quids," Latin for "The Third Somethings." The Quids insisted on strict adherence to the Constitution and other "Old Republican" principles, and supported James Monroe over Madison in the 1808 presidential election. Randolph summarized Old Republican principles as "love of peace, hatred of offensive war, jealousy of the state governments toward the general government; a dread of standing armies; a loathing of public debts, taxes, and excises; tenderness for the liberty of the citizen; jealousy, [and] Argus-eyed jealousy of the patronage of the President." Randolph was a member of the Virginia constitutional convention at Richmond in 1829, and he briefly served as Minister to Russia the following year. John Smilie (1741-1812) was a native of Ireland who served in the American Revolutionary War. He was a member of the Pennsylvania state legislature, and the U.S. House of Representatives (1793-1795, 1799-1812). Robert Smith (1757-1842) was a Revolutionary War veteran, lawyer, member of the Maryland state legislature, Secretary of the Navy (1801-1809), and Secretary of State (1809-1811). Charles Maurice de Talleyrand -Périgord (1754-1838) was a French prince and diplomat. Talleyrand was made Bishop of Autun by Louis XVI in 1788 and served in a number of influential posts, including in the National Assembly. His support for the new revolutionary France and his criticism of the Church led to his excommunication by the pope in 1791. However, he remained politically active as minister of foreign affairs, and was instrumental in drafting the French Declaration of Rights. He strongly supported Napoleon and helped prepare the coup d'état that brought him to power, but tension between the two was evident as early as 1805. In 1814 Talleyrand led the opposition, and sought to restore Louis XVIII. Talleyrand was primarily responsible for persuading the allies who occupied Paris in 1814 to return the Bourbon dynasty to the French throne. Louis XVIII, brother of Louis XVI, reappointed him to the position of minister of foreign affairs. Talleyrand is perhaps best known in the United States for his role in the XYZ Affair, in which he demanded bribes from a trio of American diplomats. Barnabas Bidwell (1763-1833) was a Massachusetts lawyer, state legislator, U.S. representative, and attorney general of Massachusetts. Around 1815 he moved to Canada and settled near Kingston, where he practiced law. He won a seat in the provincial assembly, but his opponents had him expelled for being an American citizen and fugitive, and having immoral character. He is buried in Cataraqui, Ontario. John Wayles Eppes (1773-1823) was a U.S. Representative and a U.S. Senator from Virginia and a son-in-law of Thomas Jefferson. He would defeat John Randolph in an 1813 congressional election. William Findley (1741/1742-1821) was a Pennsylvania legislator and U.S. Representative. Jacob Crowninshield (1770-1808) was a merchant, Massachusetts state senator, and U.S. representative. Jefferson had been re-elected in 1804. In the first half of 1805, James Monroe was in Madrid engaged in fruitless negotiations with the Spanish over the Florida boundary and other matters. In 1806, Madison was elected as the fourth president.


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    The Life And Selected Writings Of Thomas Jefferson by Jefferson, Thomas

    New York: Modern Library. Very Good in Good+ dust jacket. 1951. Hardcover. Text is clean. Pages tanning lightly. Cover shows normal wear. Upper corner bumped, head/base of spine rubbed lightly. Dust jacket shows wear, flap edges stained, light spotting. Includes the index not included in 1944-1950 printings. ; Toledano binding style '8', Kent endpapers in light grey, dust jacket style 'i', listing 379 titles. First of three dust jacket releases. Homeschool curricula reference: [Berquist, Designing Your Own Classical Curriculum, pg. 161 (9th grade) - Notes on the State of Virginia & First Inaugural Address]; The Modern Library; Vol. 234.2; 730 pages .


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    $22,500.00

    Thomas Jefferson Signed Act of Congress Authorizing Alexander Hamilton to Complete the Famous Portland Maine Lighthouse by THOMAS JEFFERSON

    Secretary of State Thomas Jefferson signs an act of the First Congress authorizing Secretary of the Treasury Alexander Hamilton to complete construction of a lighthouse in Maine's Portland Harbor. The $1,500 in funds allocated for the work, one of the earliest federal construction projects, was to be appropriated from duties paid on imports and tonnage. The "Portland Head Light" is the oldest lighthouse in Maine and the first to be constructed under the jurisdiction of the U.S. government. It has been memorialized in countless photographs and paintings, most notably a series of 1920s watercolors by Edward Hopper. It is now a museum, owned and operated by the town of Cape Elizabeth. It is considered to be the most photographed lighthouse in the United States. THOMAS JEFFERSON. Printed Document Signed as Secretary of State, An Act authorizing the Secretary of the Treasury to finish the Light-House, on Portland-Head, in the District of Maine . August 10, 1790, [New York, N.Y.: Francis Childs and John Swaine]. Signed in type by George Washington as President, Frederick Augustus Muhlenberg as Speaker of the House of Representatives, and John Adams as Vice President, and president of the Senate. 1p. 9¾ x 15¼ in. Evans #22955. Excerpt "… That there be appropriated and paid out of the monies arising from the duties on imports and tonnage, a sum not exceeding fifteen hundred dollars, for the purpose of finishing the light-house on Portland-head, in the District of Maine; and that the Secretary of the Treasury, under the directions of the President of the United States, be authorized to cause the said light-house to be finished and completed accordingly" Historic Background On August 7, 1789 the First Congress passed "an Act for the establishment and support of Lighthouses, Beacons, Buoys, and Public Piers." The measure made the U.S. Treasury responsible for existing lighthouses and other navigational aids, provided the states in which they were located ceded them to the federal government within one year. Construction of the Portland Head Light had begun in 1787 with a $750 appropriation from the Massachusetts legislature. (Maine would not become a separate state until 1820.) On June 10, 1790, Massachusetts agreed to cede its lighthouses to the federal government. Two weeks later, on June 24, Hamilton wrote to Benjamin Lincoln, then the collector of customs for the port of Boston, and asked him to procure "an Account of the Cost of the Light House, so far as it is built—the height to which it is carried—the height to which it is proposed to be carried, and an estimate of the expence that will attend the Completion of it." Lincoln replied on July 3 after consulting with one of the builders that the structure currently stood 58 feet high and would cost $700 to complete. On July 30, Hamilton responded that he was holding off requesting an appropriation from Congress until the state's notice of cession had been received. Passage of this act gave Hamilton the money needed. On October 4, he instructed Lincoln "that no time may be lost" The 72-foot lighthouse was completed before the end of the year. On January 10, 1791, newly-appointed keeper Joseph Greenleaf lit the 16 whale oil lamps powering the lantern for the first time. Several changes were made to the structure over the years. During the Civil War, for instance, while raids on shipping became common and ships needed to be able to spot the lighthouse as soon as possible, the tower was raised eight feet. Legislative measures signed by Jefferson as Secretary of State Following a law passed on September 15, 1789, Thomas Jefferson, as Secretary of State, signed two copies of each law, order, vote, or resolution of Congress for distribution to the executive of every state. At the time this resolution was passed, there were 13 states, so it is very likely that just 26 copies were signed by Jefferson to be sent to the governors.


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    A Stone/Force Printing of the Declaration of Independence by DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE

    " IN CONGRESS, JULY 4, 1776. The unanimous Declaration of the thirteen united States of America. " DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE. Copperplate engraving printed on thin wove paper. Imprint at bottom left, " W. J. STONE SC WASHN " [William J. Stone for Peter Force, Washington, D.C. ca. 1833]. Printed for Peter Force's American Archives , Series 5, Vol I. Approx 26 x 29 in. The United States emerged from the War of 1812 truly independent. The country had survived its second conflict with Great Britain, and the Louisiana Purchase had doubled the size of the nation. Tested in war and peace, America was on the verge of enormous physical, political, and economic expansion. It was a time of optimism, widely known as the "Era of Good Feelings." As the 50th anniversary of independence approached, a new generation sought out icons of the nation's founding. The Declaration of Independence, with its not-yet-famous signatures, became the subject of several engravings of varying quality. By 1820 the original Declaration of Independence, now housed at the National Archives in Washington, D.C., already showed signs of age and wear from handling. Secretary of State John Quincy Adams, noticing the original engrossed document's deterioration, suggested creating exact copies for posterity. With Congressional approval, he commissioned engraver William J. Stone to create a facsimile. There is still debate about whether Stone used a "wet" or chemical process to trace the original manuscript, helping to make the exact copy; we have found differences that lead us to believe that he did not. Stone finished his copperplate engraving in 1823, and printed 201 copies on vellum for distribution to the three surviving signers (John Adams, Thomas Jefferson, Charles Carroll), current President James Monroe, Vice President Daniel D. Tompkins, former President James Madison, governors, educational institutions, and the Marquis de Lafayette, among others. Just over a quarter of the vellum first editions are known to survive. Despite the creation of the replicas, the federal government did not safely store away the engrossed Declaration manuscript. It was displayed in direct sunlight for more than thirty years and suffered disastrously faulty conservation work and other insults that have rendered it mostly illegible today. Therefore, the Stone/Force printings are the best representation of the Declaration as it was when members of the Continental Congress put their lives on the line to sign the manuscript in August of 1776. Several years later, noted archivist Peter Force planned to include facsimiles in his planned documentary history. Congress authorized the project as The Documentary History of the American Revolution on March 2, 1833, and the State Department agreed to purchase 1,500 sets. Force immediately went to Stone to have copies of the Declaration printed, with only two differences: the second editions were on thin wove paper, and the imprint line was shortened and moved to the bottom left. The new imprint read, " W. J. STONE SC WASHN ," with "SC" standing for "sculpsit," meaning "engraver." On July 21, 1833, Stone invoiced Force for 4,000 Declaration copies. (Force likely hoped to sell as many as 2,500 additional copies of his series.) Force also expanded the scope of his documentary collection, renamed American Archives: A Documentary History of the United States ,to encompass six series from colonial settlement to the organization of the federal government in 1789. The fourth series was to cover the period from March 7, 1774 to the Declaration of Independence in 1776. The fifth series focused on the Declaration of Independence to the Treaty of Paris in 1783. After mounting expenses and increasing production delays, Force received Congressional re-authorization for Series IV in 1843, but he scaled back his subscription plan to 500 copies. However, Stone had already printed the Declaration facsimiles. Stone published six volumes in the fourth series, and three in the fifth series. The first volume of the fifth series, which included the Stone facsimile of the Declaration, appeared in 1848. Congress canceled the project in 1853, and Force sold his enormous collection of original documents to the Library of Congress for $100,000 in 1867. Librarians originally cataloged Stone's second facsimile edition as having been printed in 1848, when Peter Force finally published his American Archives: A Documentary History of the United States of America , Series V, Volume I, which included the Declaration facsimile. William J. Stone (1798-1865) was born in London and brought to America as a child in 1804. After studying engraving with Peter Maverick in New York, he established a business in Washington, D.C. in 1815. He did much work for the federal government, and in 1820, Secretary of State John Quincy Adams commissioned Stone to make an exact facsimile of the Declaration of Independence. In July 1823, Stone printed 201 copies on vellum for distribution to political leaders and educational institutions. Stone also received a patent for a printer's inking apparatus in 1829. Stone continued to work as a printer and engraver in Washington for the rest of his career, and he became one of Washington's wealthiest citizens, with $157,000 in real property in 1860. Stone was an officer in the Agricultural Society of the United States, and a founding member (with Peter Force) of the National Institute for the Promotion of Science. During the Civil War, the Army constructed a hospital on his farm. In 1821, Stone married Elizabeth Jane Lenthall (1804-1892) and she also became an engraver, specializing in maps. They had at least four children. Peter Force (1790-1868) was born near Passaic Falls, New Jersey, to a Revolutionary War veteran and his wife. Force moved to New York City, where he learned the printing trade and joined the printers' trade union, of which he served as president from 1812 to 1815. During the War of 1812, Force served in the army, rising to the rank of lieutenant. At the end of the war, he moved to Washington, D.C., and worked for public printer William A. Davis. In 1822, Force received a patent for a method of color printing. He founded and published the National Journal from 1823 to 1830. He supported John Quincy Adams for president in 1824 and served as mayor of Washington from 1836 to 1840. His primary achievements were as a collector and editor of historical documents. He published a series of rare pamphlets in four volumes between 1836 and 1846. From 1837 to 1853, Force published nine volumes of his American Archives: A Documentary History of the United States , under the authority of Congress and the sponsorship of the State Department. The seventh volume included a precise facsimile engraving of the Declaration of Independence by William J. Stone. Force had planned to compile twenty volumes to cover from colonial origins to 1789, but Congress canceled the project in 1853. His compilation is an essential source for the history of the United States between 1774 and 1776. In 1867, Congress purchased Force's collection of original documents for $100,000, and added them to the collections of the Library of Congress.


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    Jefferson's Response to the New Haven Merchants' Remonstrance, and his First Inaugural Address by THOMAS JEFFERSON, WILLIAM CRANCH

    [THOMAS JEFFERSON, WILLIAM CRANCH]. Pamphlet. An Examination of The President's Reply to the New-Haven Remonstrance; with …the President's Inaugural Speech, The Remonstrance and Reply … a List of Removals from Office and New Appointments . 1801. New York: George F. Hopkins. FIRST EDITION. Octavo. 69pp. "Of the various Executive duties, no one excites more anxious concern than that of placing the interests of our fellow citizens in the hands of honest men, with understandings sufficient for their station …In the case of Samuel Bishop however, the subject of your remonstrance, time was taken, information was sought, and such obtained as could leave no room for doubt of his fitness. From private sources it was learnt that his understanding was sound, his integrity pure, his character unstained …The will of the nation, manifested by their various elections, calls for an administration of government according with the opinions of those elected; if, for the fulfilment of that will, displacements are necessary, with whom can they so justly begin as with persons appointed in the last moments of an administration, not for it's own aid, but to begin a career at the same time with their successors, by whom they had never been approved, and who could scarcely expect from them a cordial cooperation? … I lament sincerely that unessential differences of opinion should ever have been deemed sufficient to interdict half the society from the rights & the blessings of self-government; to proscribe them as unworthy of every trust. It would have been to me a circumstance of great relief had I found a moderate participation of office in the hands of the Majority. I would gladly have left to time & accident to raise them to their just share, but their total exclusion calls for prompter correctives." Historical Background Jefferson's ascension to the presidency in 1801 marked the first time in American history that power was transferred from one political party to another. The peaceful transition removed fears of a counterrevolution, a welcome reassurance after the rancorous, drawn-out election of 1800. Jefferson's first "Inaugural Address" (which is printed in this pamphlet), with its famous call to unity ("We are all Federalists; We are all Republicans"); was received with some optimism, though many Federalists remained skeptical. One of the earliest actions of his administration seemed to bear out the Federalist's cynicism. Reacting against the Federalist bias of Adams and Washington in appointing federal officers, Jefferson began replacing Federalist appointees with his own Republican nominees. Jefferson was thorough in this process, replacing officers even in comparatively humble positions. One of the men removed by his administration was a popular customs official, Elizur Goodrich, at the port of New Haven. The reaction of the city's merchants was swift but respectful. Presuming, at least on paper, Jefferson's ignorance of local circumstances, they requested Goodrich's reinstatement. Jefferson's somewhat patronizing reply, which denied the merchant's request while developing a reply that seemed to presume their ignorance of constitutional matters, was criticized by both Federalists and some Republicans, who lamented what they saw as Jefferson's betrayal of his principles. Excerpt: Jefferson's First Inaugural Address: "… though the will of the majority is in all cases to prevail, that will, to be rightful, must be reasonable…the minority possess their equal rights, which equal law must protect, and to violate would be oppression . Let us then, fellow-citizens, unite with one heart and one mind; let us restore to social intercourse that harmony and affection without which liberty, and even life itself, are but dreary things. And let us reflect, that having banished from our land that religious intolerance under which mankind so long bled and suffered, we have yet gained little, if we countenance a political intolerance, as despotic, as wicked, and capable of as bitter and bloody persecutions…every difference of opinion is not a difference of principle. We have called by different names brethren of the same principle. We are all republicans; we are all federalists. If there be any among us who would wish to dissolve the Union, or to change its republican form, let them stand undisturbed as monuments of the safety with which error of opinion may be tolerated, where reason is left free to combat it…"


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    Jefferson’s Tragic Loss Sparks Hope for Reconciliation with Adams by THOMAS JEFFERSON

    A remarkable, poignant letter from a crucial chapter in Jefferson's life, his presidency, anticipating his famous reconciliation with his predecessor and longtime compatriot, Adams, but still holding one grudge. " He & myself have gone through so many scenes together…that I have never withdrawn my esteem, and I am happy that this letter gives an opportunity of expressing it to both of them. I shall do it with a frank declaration that one act of his life, & never but one, gave me personal displeasure, his midnight appointments. A respect for him will not permit me to ascribe that altogether to the influence of others, it will leave something for friendship to forgive. " THOMAS JEFFERSON. Autograph Letter Signed as President, to John W. Eppes, June 4, 1804, Washington D.C. 2 pp., 7¾ x 10 in. Complete Transcript Washington June 4. 04 I should much sooner have written to you but for the press of business which had accumulated at my return, and which is not yet entirely got under. We lamented much that you had not staid a day longer at Monticello, as on the evening of your departure the Eppington family arrived, and it would have added much to our happiness to have been all together the 4 or 5 days that the weather detained me at home. We consented to consign little Maria to the entreaties of Mrs Eppes until August when she promised to bring her back herself. Nature's laws will in time deprive her of all her older connections. It will then be a great comfort to have been brought up with those of her own age, as sisters & brothers of the same house, knowing each other in no other relation, and ready to become the parent of each other's orphan children. While I live both the children will be to me the dearest of all pledges, and I shall consider it as increasing our misfortune should we have the less of your society. It will in no wise change my views at Pantops, and should considerations, which ought not to be opposed by me in the actual state of things, induce you to change the purpose of your residence at Pantops, I shall still do there what I had always proposed to you; expecting it will some day become the residence of Francis. I may only take more time for it after Lilly shall have done at the mill, which I suppose will be by the time of my return home, there are then three jobs for him, the leveling at Pantops, the road along the river, and the leveling the garden at Monticello. Which of these he first enters on will depend on your views. If they be to get to Pantops as soon as you can; he shall first do that levilling, that it may be in readiness to begin a house the next season. In any other case I should set him about the road first. But I should be happier did the other order of things coincide more with your happiness. But I press nothing, because my own feelings as a parent teach me how to estimate & respect the feelings of parents. John W. Eppes [2] This subject you must give me your wishes with frankness as mine will be most gratified in taking the direction of yours. I inclose you a letter I received lately from Mrs Adams. The sentiments expressed in it are sincere. Her attachment was constant. Although all of them point to another object directly, yet the expressing them to me is a proof that our friendship is unbroken on her part. It has been a strong one, and has gone through trying circumstances on both sides. Yet I retain it strongly both for herself and Mr Adams. He & myself have gone through so many scenes together, that all his qualities have been proved to me, and I know him to possess so many good ones, as that I have never withdrawn my esteem , and I am happy that this letter gives me an opportunity of expressing it to both of them. I shall do it with a frank declaration that one act of his life, & never but one, gave me personal displeasure, his midnight appointments. A respect for him will not permit me to ascribe that altogether to the influence of others, it will leave something for friendship to forgive ; Patsy [Martha] is with you, communicate the letter to her, and be so good as to inclose it to me. I think I shall leave this about the 22d. of July, and shall hope to find you in Albemarle, and that you will soon be followed there by the Eppington family. I shall take my trip to Bedford soon after my arrival. Present me affectionately to the family at Eppington, keep Francis mindful of me, and give both of them my kisses. Affectionately adieu. Th: Jefferson Historical Background Thomas Jefferson's wife had died nineteen years before he became president. His two daughters, Maria Eppes and Martha Randolph, each married to talented, young Virginia politicians, shared hostess duties at the White House. However, Maria died on April 17, 1804, leaving behind a grieving husband and a devastated father. To a boyhood friend, Jefferson wrote, "having lost even the half of all I had, my evening prospects now hang on the slender thread of a single life. Perhaps I may be destined to see even this last chord of parental affection broken." In this letter, Jefferson counsels his son-in-law on the upbringing of the now motherless infant, Maria, and assures him that he will remain part of his family. He demonstrates this by discussing the continuing renovations of Monticello and neighboring Pantops, to which John and Maria were destined to move before her death. Pantops had been Jefferson's dowry to the couple on their wedding day in 1797. Abigail Adams had been a surrogate mother to Maria ("Polly") Jefferson when the little girl stayed with the Adamses in London in the mid-1780s. Hearing of Polly's death, Abigail wrote: "Reasons of various kinds withheld my pen" from writing Jefferson sooner, "until the powerful feelings of my heart have burst through the restraint, and called me to shed the tear of sorrow over the departed remains of your beloved and deserved daughter, an event which I most sincerely mourn." But Jefferson was wrong to think that Abigail had changed her feelings towards him, and wrong in thinking that his frank admission about the midnight appointments would clear the air. They only provoked a scathing letter from Abigail, in which she decided to be frank about her resentments against Jefferson--and there was more than one. By the time their exchange of letters finished five months later, relations were as bad between Monticello and Quincy as they had been on midnight, March 3, 1801. The "midnight appointments," to which Jefferson refers, were John Adams's appointments of several dozen judgeships in his last hours of office upon departing the presidency in 1801. Jefferson and Secretary of State Madison chose not to deliver the commission of one such appointment, William Marbury, which had been accidentally misplaced. This commenced the famous case of Marbury v. Madison , where Chief Justice John Marshall, also an Adams appointee and an inveterate enemy of Jefferson, pronounced the doctrine of judicial review. Jefferson felt that Adams had spitefully named Federalists to these positions, where they could only be removed by impeachment, when he should have allowed them to remain vacant until he assumed the office. Thomas Jefferson (1743-1826) Author of the Declaration of Independence, governor of Virginia, secretary of state under George Washington, third president of the U.S., (1801-1809) and Founder of the University of Virginia. Under Jefferson, the country began its westward expansion with the Louisiana Purchase (1803) and the Lewis & Clark Expedition (1804-1806). John Wayles Eppes (1773-1823) was the son-in-law of Thomas Jefferson and a lawyer and politician. He served successively in the state House of Delegates, the House of Representatives (advancing to chair the Ways and Means Committee), and the U.S. Senate.


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    THE DOMESTIC LIFE OF THOMAS JEFFERSON by Randolph, Sarah N

    University of Virginia Press. Near Fine. 1978. Second Printing. Softcover. 8vo 8" - 9" tall; 452 pages .


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    THOMAS JEFFERSON AND HIS WORLD American Heritage Junior Library by Moscow, Henry

    Troll Associates. Near Fine. 1960. Hardcover. Slight touch of wear to the spine tips and corners. ; Small 4to 9" - 11" tall; 153 pages .


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    JEFFERSON AND MONTICELLO The Biography of a Builder by McLaughlin, Jack

    Henry Holt and Company. Near Fine in Near Fine dust jacket. 1988. First Edition. Hardcover. 8vo 8" - 9" tall; 289 pages .


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    The Life And Selected Writings Of Thomas Jefferson by Jefferson, Thomas

    New York: Modern Library. Very Good in Very Good dust jacket. 1951. Hardcover. Text is clean. Pages tanning lightly. Cover shows normal wear. Upper corner bumped, head/base of spine rubbed lightly. Dust jacket shows light wear, along edges, light chipping at spine. Includes the index not included in 1944-1950 printings. ; Toledano binding style '11', Kent endpapers in light grey, dust jacket style 'i'. Second of three dust jacket releases. Homeschool curricula reference: [Berquist, Designing Your Own Classical Curriculum, pg. 161 (9th grade) - Notes on the State of Virginia & First Inaugural Address]; The Modern Library; Vol. 234.2; 730 pages .


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    JEFFERSON AND THE NATURAL WORLD : AN ARTIST'S CHOICE The Catalogue of an Exhibition in Commeroration of the 250th Anniversary of the Birth of Thomas Jefferson by Morgan, Kathryn

    University of Virginia. Near Fine. 1993. 2000 copies. Stapled wraps. 8vo 8" - 9" tall; 27 pages .


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    “No Nation is Drunken where Wine is Cheap”: Jefferson’s Famous Letter on Government and Wine by THOMAS JEFFERSON

    The retired founding father offers thoughts on the political economy of wine importation and foretells the future stability and prosperity of France after Napoleon. " …her constitution, as now amended, gives as much of self-government as perhaps she can yet bear… No nation is drunken where wine is cheap; and none sober, where the dearness of wine substitutes ardent spirits as the common beverage. " THOMAS JEFFERSON. Autograph Letter Signed, to the Baron Hyde de Neville, December 13, 1818, Monticello. 2 pp., 7⅞ x 9⅝ in. Complete Transcript Monticello Dec. 13. 18. I thank your Excellency for the notice, with which your letter favors me, of the liberation of France from the occupation of the Allied powers. To no one, not a native, will it give more pleasure. in the desolation of Europe to gratify the atrocious caprices of Bonaparte, France sinned much: but she has suffered more than retaliation. once relieved from the Incubus of her late oppression, she will rise like a giant from her slumbers. her soil and climate, her arts and eminent science, her central position and free constitution, will soon make her greater than she ever was. and I am a false prophet if she does not, at some future day, remind of her sufferings those who have inflicted them the most eagerly. I hope however she will be quiet for the present, and risk no new troubles. her constitution, as now amended, gives as much of self-government as perhaps she can yet bear, and will give more when the habits of order shall have prepared her to receive more. besides the gratitude which every American owes her, as our sole ally during the war of independence, I am additionally affectioned by the friendships I contracted there, by the good dispositions I witnessed, and by the courtesies I received. I rejoice, as a Moralist, at the prospect of a reduction of the duties on wine, by our national legislature. it is an error to view a tax on that liquor as merely a tax on the rich. it is a prohibition of it's use to the midling class of our citizens, and a condemnation of them to the poison of whisky, which is desolating their houses. no nation is drunken where wine is cheap; and none sober, where the dearness of wine substitutes ardent spirits as the common beverage. it is in truth the only antidote to the bane of whisky. fix but the duty [2] at the rate of other merchandise, and we can drink wine here as cheaply as we do grog: and who will not prefer it? it's extended use will carry health and comfort to a much enlarged circle. every one in easy circumstances (as the bulk of our citizens are) will prefer it to the poison to which they are now driven by their government. and the treasury itself will find that a penny apiece from a dozen is more than a groat from a single one. this reformation however will require time. our merchants know nothing of the infinite variety of cheap and good wines to be had in Europe; and particularly in France, in Italy, and the Graecian islands: as they know little also of the variety of excellent manufactures and comforts to be had any where out of England. nor will these things be known, nor of course called for here, until the native merchants of those countries, to whom they are known, shall bring them forward, exhibit & send them at the moderate profits they can afford. this alone will procure them familiarity with us, and the preference they merit in competition with corresponding articles now in use. Our family renews with pleasure their recollections of your kind visit to Monticello, and joins me in tendering sincere assurances of the gratification it afforded us, and of our great esteem & respectful consideration Th: Jefferson Historical Background Jefferson imported both wines and grape vines for cultivation from Europe. His cellar had vintages from France, Italy, Spain, Greece, Portugal, Hungary, and Germany, and he advised other chief executives on the best wines to serve at federal functions. He concludes his letter to Baron de Neuville by recalling the pleasure of their last visit together; an event at which fine wine was undoubtedly served: " Our family renews with pleasure their recollections of your kind visit to Monticello, and joins me in tendering sincere assurances of the gratification it afforded us, and of our great esteem & respectful consideration. " Rather than a letter on prohibition, Jefferson actually extols the virtues of moderation, putting forth the idea that the consumption of wine is much more salubrious than whiskey drinking. " No nation is drunken where wine is cheap; and none sober, where the dearness of wine substitutes ardent spirits as the common beverage. " Although the subject of Jefferson's letter may seem to change abruptly, he had in fact already mentioned France's "soil and climate" as two of her great gifts, and the topic of wine duties was an appropriate one to discuss with the French minister. Madigan was projecting his own hostility to the eighteenth amendment when he described this letter as setting forth Jefferson's "views on the prohibition question." It is actually a carefully reasoned tribute to the health and economic benefits of wine, and one of longest passages on oenology by America's first great wine connoisseur. John Hailman's book, Thomas Jefferson on Wine (University Press of Mississippi, 2006), notes that "One of Jefferson's favorite topics in later life was how wine promoted sobriety," to which end he lobbied President Monroe and Treasury Secretary Alexander Dallas to lower import duties on French wine. Hailman cites a brief extract from this letter, lauding it because "it has so many quotable passages" (pp. 353–54). An extraordinary and revealing letter, beginning with a warm encomium to France, " our sole ally during the war of independence ," at the conclusion of the Napoleonic Wars. Jefferson, in contrast, reveals his longstanding antipathy to England and discomfiture at America's dependence on trade with England. Provenance Helen Fahnestock Hubbard (Parke-Bernet, March 27, 1956, lot 63). While the recipient of this letter is not indicated, the manuscript was purchased about 1930 by Thomas Madigan, who reveals in Word Shadows of the Great that "Among the papers of Baron de Neuville, French Minister to the United States … I came across a letter of Thomas Jefferson in which the great democrat set forth his views on the prohibition question."


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    A MANUAL OF PARLIAMENTARY PRACTICE FOR THE USE OF THE SENATE OF THE UNITED STATES Reprint of the First Edition of 1801 with Annotations by Jefferson, Thomas

    Government Printing Office. Very Good. 1993. Softcover. 8vo 8" - 9" tall; 129 pages .


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    Jefferson and His Time - Vol. 5 of 6 - Jefferson The President - Second Term 1805 - 1809 - Illustrated by Malone, Dumas

    Boston: Little, Brown and Company, 1970. 704 Pages Indexed. Blue cloth with gold spine lettering and decoration to front. Blue top page edges. No defects noted to this tight book with pointed corners and flawless interior text pages. Dust jacket has some minor edge wear, shelf rubbing, and a 3 inch tear to the jacket front. Illustrated with maps and drawings. In this Volume 5 Malone completes the story of Jefferson's presidency following his career that spanned some forty years. Jefferson has mounting problems even as he remained the major unifying factor in his party and the government. He was confronted by events that frustrated even his masterful statesmanship. Aaron Burr's conspiracy provided most of the drama on the domestic scene, while the highly controversial trial that followed Burr's arrest aggravated an already bitter relationship between the executive and judicial branches. In Congress, the once-cooperative John Randolph exerted his influence to obstruct land settlements in the Louisiana Territory. On the whole, it was a turbulent period of factionalism coupled with aggression from abroad, as foreign powers displayed little respect for the security of the lightly armed young Republic. Yet Jefferson's second term also produced several positive achievements. His leadership remained distinctly personal and he continued to attach fundamental importance to maintaining constitutional freedoms such as freedom of speech. He secured his greatest success with his western exploration with the Lewis and Clark expedition. He enjoyed constructive, cordial relations with most members of the Congress until near the end of his term. Jefferson left the presidency a troubled and discouraged man. Yet his withdrawal from office was only a prelude to the outstanding public service he rendered as a private citizen which is the subject of the final volume in this monumental biography. . Third Printing. Hard Back. As New/Good. 6 1/2" X 8 3/4".


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    AUTOBIOGRAPHY by Jefferson, Thomas

    The Thomas Jefferson Society. Good+. 2000. Softcover. Edgewear and creasing to the covers. ; 4to 11" - 13" tall; 83 pages .


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    Jefferson And His Time [6 Volumes Complete] by Malone, Dumas

    Boston, MA: Little, Brown And Company. Hardcover. Various Dates. 8vo . Fine in Very Good DJ. B&W Illustrations. Volume 5 DJ has a repaired tear at head of spine and the coating of the jacket has some bubbling. All other volumes are Fine/ Fine. Set includes: Jefferson the Virginian (1) ; Jefferson and the Rights of Man (2) ; Jefferson and the Ordeal of Liberty ( 3) ; Jefferson the President, First Term (4) ; Jefferson the President, Second Term (5) ; The Sage of Monticello (6) . Volume 1 is an 18th printing. Vol. 2 is a 12th printing. Vol. 3 is 1962 8th printing. Vol. 4 is 1970 4th printing. Vol. 5 is 1974 3rd printing. Vol. 6 is a 1981 first edition .


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    JEFFERSON'S WESTERN TRAVELS Over Virginia's Blue Ridge Mountains by Crotty, Gene

    The Author. Good. 2002. First Edition. Hardcover. Inscribed and signed by author on title-page: "To my "West Virginia" friend. Arthur Belton. Gene Crotty Dec 1, 2008". Light pencil underlining throughout. ; 8vo 8" - 9" tall; 225 pages .


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    L'Hotel de Langeac: Jefferson's Paris Residence / Residence de Jefferson a Paris 1785-1789 by Rice, Howard C

    Paris, France / Monticello, VA: Chez Henri Lefebvre / Thomas Jefferson Memorial Foundation, 1947. First edition. 4to: wraps. Very Good. Uncut. Rear cover and edges a little dusty. No markings.


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