Sign In | Register
image of Ulysses.


Ulysses

By Joyce, James




Ulysses is a modernist novel by James Joyce. It was first serialized in The Little Review from March 1918 to December 1920 and later published by Shakespeare and Company in 1922. Originally, Joyce conceived of Ulysses as a short story to be included in Dubliners, but decided instead to publish it as a long novel, situated as a sort of sequel to A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, picking up Stephen Dedalus’s life over a year later. Ulysses takes place on a single day, June 16, 1904, in Dublin.

Within the massive text of 265,000 words (not so “short” anymore, eh?), divided in 18 episodes, Joyce radically shifts narrative style with each new episode, completely abandoning the previously accepted notions of plot, setting, and characters. The presentation of a fragmented reality through interior perception in Ulysses, often through stream-of-consciousness, is one of many reasons it is a paramount of Modernist literature. 

Ulysses presents a series of parellels with Homer’s epic poem Odyssey (Ulysses is the Latinized name of Odysseus.) Not only can correspondences be drawn between the main characters of each text — Stephen Dedalus to Telemachus, Leopold Bloom to Odysseus, and Molly Bloom to Penelope, but each of the 18 episodes of Ulysses reflects an adventure from the Odyssey.

 In 1998, the American publishing firm Modern Library ranked Ulysses first on its list of the 100 best English-language novels of the 20th century.

First edition identification and notes

Unable to find a publisher in the U.S. or U.K., Ulysses was first published in book form by Shakespeare and Company in Paris in 1922. This first edition appeared in blue and white printed wrappers in an edition of only 1,000 copies which are among the most highly sought after modern first editions, commanding prices in the range of $40,000 - $75,000. A signed first edition could easily fetch over $100,000.

Other collectible or notable editions

There have been at least 18 editions and variations in different impressions of each edition, though some are certainly more notable than others. Harriet Weaver of the Egoist Press published the first “English edition” of Ulysses later in 1922. Following the publication of this edition, the text was banned and the novel forced underground. In 1933, Random House successfully applied to the US courts to overturn the ban and published its first American edition in January 1935. However, a pirated Roth edition was published in New York in 1929. Other notable editions include the first U.K. Edition, published by John Lane / the Bodley Head in London in 1936, the first U.S. Random House edition of 1935 and the Limited Editions Club edition of 1935 (with illustrations by Henry Matisse).


Available copies: Ulysses By Joyce, James


Showing best matches | Show all copies

image of Ulysses.

Ulysses.

Joyce, James

Paris: Shakespeare and Company, 1922. First edition, one of 750 numbered copies, this example is number 282. Quarto, original blue wrappers as issued. Inscribed by the author on the half-title page, "To Lewis Galantiere James Joyce Paris 11 February 1922." Ulysses was scheduled for publication on Joyce's fortieth birthday (February 2, 1922), but only two copies were ready on that date due to technical difficulties in printing the cover, the color of which Joyce wanted to match with the blue of the Greek flag. One of these was the copy delivered by Sylvia Beach to Joyce on February 2, which he then inscribed to his wife Nora, being the only known presentation copy to predate Galantiere's. The present copy in turn predates by two days the three copies presented to Sylvia Beach, Harriet Shaw Weaver and Margaret Anderson, and by three days the copy inscribed to Robert McAlmon, who helped Joyce prepare the final typescript. Galantiere was an American translator of French literature, writer, playwright and journalist. From 1920 to 1927 he was secretary of the International Chamber of Commerce in Paris, and came to know most of the literary figures of the day, including Hemingway. In a letter to Harriet Weaver of 17 April 1926, Joyce writes: "I am to read [from Finnegans Wake] ... to a small group, this time including ... a young American Galantiere who is preparing a course of lectures of Ulysses" (Joyce Letters vol 3, p 140). Slocum & Cahoon A17; Connolly The Modern Movement 42. In excellent condition with light rubbing, rebacked without the folding flaps. With Galantiere's marginal markings in pencil and in ink. Housed in a custom full morocco clamshell box. An exceptional rarity of this twentieth century milestone. Ulysses was published in Paris by Shakespeare & Company in 1922. "The novel is universally hailed as the most influential work of modern times" (Grolier Joyce 69). After working seven years on Ulysses, Joyce, desperate to find a publisher, turned to Sylvia Beach of Shakespeare and Company in Paris. "Within a month of the publication, the first printing of Ulysses was practically sold out, and within a year Joyce had become a well-known literary figure. Ulysses was explosive in its impact on the literary world of 1922... Then began the great game of smuggling the edition into countries where it was forbidden, especially England and the United States. The contraband article was transported across the seas and national borders in all sorts of cunning ways" (de Grazia, 27).

trust seal
$150,000.00

image of Ulysses.

Ulysses.

JOYCE, James.

Paris: Shakespeare and Company,, 1922. Quarto (259 × 202 mm). Contemporary purple sheep, dated 1922 in gilt at the foot of the front turn-in, marbled endpapers, top edge gilt, others uncut; original printed wrappers bound in. Sheep with small areas of wear, purple dye a little sunned and faded on front board, inscribed half-title slightly toned, an excellent copy. First edition, first printing, large paper issue, one of 150 copies on verge d'Arches, this copy number 136, one of three copies of this issue recorded in Sylvia Beach's notebook as sent to James Whitall on 28 March 1922; this copy additionally signed and dated by Joyce on the half-title, "James Joyce, Paris, 27.vi.[1]929". Brought up as a Quaker in Philadelphia, James Whitall (1888–1954) came to England just before the war, cushioned by an independent income. Through John Cournos, whom he had known in the United States, he met the Aldingtons in August 1914. His literary tastes were fairly conservative, but he became particularly friendly with HD, whose lover Bryher was a key financial supporter of Sylvia Beach's bookshop. Whitall never completed any original poetry or prose, but came to make his career as a translator of French and later, for a period, as a reader at Heinemann's. He gives an affectionate account of his friendship with the Aldingtons in English Years (London: Jonathan Cape, 1936). No correspondence between him and Joyce survives, and the book was probably signed for him by Joyce through Sylvia Beach's agency. Though without bookplate, this copy was latterly in the library of John and Janet Jameson, who likely acquired this copy in the 1950s, after Whitall's death. Ulysses was published in imitation of the traditional three-tiered French format aimed at both connoisseurs and readers: 100 copies were printed on Dutch handmade paper and signed by Joyce; 150 copies were printed on heavier vergé d'Arches to create this large paper format; and the remaining 750 copies formed a small format trade issue, printed on less expensive vergé à barbes stock. With its generous margins, the large paper format is the most aesthetically pleasing of the three formats.

trust seal
$120,400.00

image of Ulysses

Ulysses

JOYCE, JAMES

Paris: Shakespeare & Co., 1922. First Edition; one of 750 numbered copies. Original publisher’s wrappers. Minor rubbing and soiling of the wrappers; a little short of fine, but an excellent, unrestored copy. Never having read this effusively praised and influential book, this cataloguer will refrain from plagiarizing those who are actually familiar with it. In a custom clamshell box.

trust seal
$85,000.00

image of Ulysses.

Ulysses.

JOYCE, James.

Paris: Shakespeare and Company,, 1922. Small quarto. Original blue wrappers, titles to cover in white. Housed in a turquoise quarter morocco solander box by the Chelsea Bindery. An unusually bright and fresh copy, with slight marks to spine panel and rear wrapper, tiny closed tear to wrappers at foot of spine but entirely sound, a little rubbing to tips of wrappers and spine, light crease to front wrapper and first few pages. A beautiful, unopened copy of this famously vulnerable production, unusually bright and fresh. First edition, first printing, number 724 of 750 copies, from a total edition of 1,000 copies. Ulysses was published in imitation of the traditional three-tiered French format aimed at both connoisseurs and readers: 100 copies were printed on Dutch handmade paper and signed by Joyce; 150 large paper copies were printed on heavier vergé d'Arches, and the remaining 750 copies formed this slightly smaller format trade issue. The recipient of this copy is not recorded in Sylvia Beach's notebook, but laid-in is a typed note signed from literary editor Burton Rascoe, on New York Herald Tribune headed paper and dated 10 October 1922, to Russell Loines, the American literary patron: "Lewis Galantière, in Paris, has sent to me a copy of 'Ulysses' to be forwarded to you. There is danger in sending it through the mails... Please direct me". Galantière "represented the International Chamber of Commerce in Paris from 1920 till 1927, where his literary interests brought him into contact with a wide array of expatriate writers".

trust seal
$79,120.00

image of Ulysses.

Ulysses.

Joyce, James

Paris: Shakespeare & Company, 1922. First edition. One of 750 numbered copies on handmade paper from a total edition of 1000 copies. Thick quarto, original blue and white wrappers. A near fine example, internally fresh and largely unopened, the wrappers not significantly soiled or faded, and completely unrestored. Housed in a custom half morocco clamshell box. This is copy #992, and has laid in the front panel of the original prospectus with the tipped-on reproduction of the 1918 photo of Joyce by C. Ruf. The front panel of the prospectus has been amended, as often, to indicate the book "is now ready," and the original buyer must have jumped at the opportunity, as the order panel of the prospectus has been neatly cut away. Sisley Huddleston's 5 March 1922 review from The Observer is also laid in (though both items are in prophylactic sleeves that have prevented any offsetting). Also laid into the slipcase is some correspondence relating to the sale of this copy in 1972 by Duschnes in New York City. A very sharp example with exceptional provenance. Ulysses was published in Paris by Shakespeare & Company, 1922. It was a struggle for the author to find a publisher, a comic irony considering that Ulysses is "[u]niversally hailed as the most influential work of modern times" (Grolier Joyce 69). Ulysses was an immediate success. The first printing sold out, and "within a year Joyce had become a well-known literary figure. Ulysses was explosive in its impact on the literary world of 1922" (de Grazia, 27). Even so, the book faced difficulties in global reception. It was banned in the U.K. and was prosecuted for the obscenity in the Nausicaa episode (Ellmann, 1982). Joyce's inspiration for the novel began as a young boy reading Charles Lamb's Adventures of Ulysses and writing an essay entitled "My Favorite Hero" after being impressed by the wholeness of the character (Goreman, 1939). The idea for the novel grew from a story in Dubliners in 1906, which Joyce expanded into a short book in 1907, before reconceptualizing it as the heady novel in 1914 (Ellmann, 1982). The book can initially seem unstructured and chaotic, and Joyce admitted that he "put in so many enigmas and puzzles that it will keep the professors busy for centuries arguing over what I meant" (The Observer, 2000). The French translator Stuart Gilbert published a defense of Ulysses shortly after its publication in which he supported the novel's use of obscenity and explained its internal structure and links to the Odyssey against accusations of ambiguity. Every episode, Gilbert explained, is connected to the Odyssey by theme, technique, and correspondence between characters. Another instance of Ulysses' literary contribution is his use of stream-of-consciousness, a technique employing carefully structured prose, both humorous and charactering, and involving puns and parodies. Joyce was a precursor to the use of stream of consciousness in the later decades. Similar narrative techniques were used by his contemporaries Virginia Wolfe, William Faulkner, and Italo Svevo. Their style can be better characterized as an "interior monologue, rather than stream of consciousness, is the appropriate term for the style in which [subjective experience] is recorded, both in The Waves and in Woolf's writing generally" (Stevenson, 1992).

trust seal
$75,000.00

image of Ulysses.

Ulysses.

JOYCE, James.

Paris: Shakespeare and Company,, 1922. Small quarto (233 x 178 mm). Contemporary blue half morocco with the original wrappers bound-in, decorative gilt spine, blue linen sides, top edges gilt, marbled endpapers. Housed in a custom made blue cloth solander box, red calf label. Joints rubbed but professionally refurbished; bound without the final blank. An excellent copy. First edition, first printing, number 795 from a total edition of 1,000 copies, one of 750 copies on vergé à barbes. Signed by Joyce on the blank before the half-title: "James Joyce, Paris, 26 February 1924". At this time Joyce was already at work on Finnegans Wake and on the previous day (25 February) had penned a postcard to Ford Madox Ford asking "can you please let me have my typescript back and the first proofs?"; Ford, editing the transatlantic review, was to publish the first fragment in the April 1924 issue (see Richard Ellmann, Letters of James Joyce, vol. III, 1966, p. 89). Ulysses was published on 2 February 1922 in imitation of the traditional three-tiered French format aimed at both connoisseurs and readers: 100 copies were printed on Dutch handmade paper and signed by Joyce; 150 copies were printed on heavier vergé d'Arches to create a large paper format; and the remaining 750 copies formed a small format trade issue, printed on less expensive vergé à barbes stock.

trust seal
$75,680.00

image of Ulysses

Ulysses

JOYCE, James

Paris: Shakespeare & Co, 1922. First. paperback. near fine. Thick large 8vo, original blue wrappers printed in white. Preserved in a 1/4 red morocco slipcase. Paris: Shakespeare & Co., 1922. First edition. From a total printing of 1000, this is one of 750 copies on handmade paper. A fresh copy with only very small chips where the wrappers meet the spine; completely un-restored. Number 507 of 1000 numbered copies. S & C. A17.

trust seal
$65,000.00

image of Ulysses.

Ulysses.

JOYCE, James.

Paris: Shakespeare and Company,, 1922. Small quarto. Original blue wrappers, titles to upper wrapper in white. In a blue quarter morocco solander case. Housed in a turquoise quarter morocco solander box by the Chelsea Bindery. Edges rubbed with some typical separation at the spine, some very minor loss at the spine, a few light scratches to the wrappers but a fresh and entirely unrestored example with particularly strong colour. First edition. From a total edition of 1,000 copies this is copy number 355 of the last 750 on handmade paper. There were also 100 signed copies on thicker paper and 150 large paper copies.

trust seal
$51,600.00

image of Ulysses - First Edition 1922 - no. 700/750

Ulysses - First Edition 1922 - no. 700/750

Joyce, James

Paris: Shakespeare and Company, 1922. Paris: Shakespeare and Company 1922. Small quarto. Original blue wrappers, titles to upper wrapper in white. First edition, first printing. The paper covers have benefitted from some restoration from the world's leading paper restorer and now presents very well indeed. From a total edition of 1000 copies - this is copy 700 of the last 750 on handmade paper. In addition, there were also 100 signed copies on thicker paper and 150 large paper copies.

trust seal
$37,840.00

Ulysses

JOYCE, JAMES

Paris: Shakespeare & Co., 1922. Full gilt lettered turquoise leather with the original turquoise wraps bound in. Housed in matching clamshell box. This is the first edition limited to 750 copies on handmade paper of which this is #629. The wraps are complete (minus spine) with some scuffing and minor marking to them. Otherwise a very sharp clean copy attractively rebound. The most influential, if not the greatest, novel of the 20th century by the greatest of all wordsmiths published by the adoring Sylvia Beach at Shakespeare and Co. Joyce was the only author she ever published. What a choice! . 1st Edition. Leather (wraps Bound in ). VG+/VG+. 8vo.

trust seal
$35,000.00

image of Ulysses.

Ulysses.

JOYCE, James.

London: John Lane, The Bodley Head,, 1936. Quarto. Original white vellum, titles to spine and the Gill-designed Homeric bow device to boards, top edge gilt, others uncut. With the publisher's slipcase. Pencilled ownership inscription of the endocrinologist and Joyce collector Alfred T. Cowie, 1951. Spine very slightly faded but a particularly nice copy in the somewhat rubbed and marked slipcase. First UK edition, first impression. From a total printing of 1,000 numbered copies, this is one of 100 on handmade paper, bound in vellum and signed by the author. This deluxe issue of the Bodley Head Ulysses is one of the triumphs of 20th century book production. It established the text for the succeeding 25 years and printed as appendices the International Letter of Protest against Samuel Roth's piracy and the famous legal judgement by John M. Woolsey lifting the ban in America on the publishing of the book.

trust seal
$34,400.00

Ulysses

JOYCE, James

Paris: Shakespeare & Co, 1922. Limited. paperback. very good(-). Thick large 8vo, original blue wrappers printed in white. Paris: Shakespeare & Co., 1922. First edition. From a total printing of 1000, this is one of only 150 large paper copies on verge d'Arches, measuring 10.375 x 8.9375 inches. Housed in a blue half morocco clam-shell case. A large, uncut copy in original wrappers, paper lacking from the spine and with small chips at the joints; faint discoloration on copyright and limitation pages from old paper once laid in; a handful of other pages with brownish spatter. Number 174 of 1000 numbered copies. Although the series of 750 were numbered 251- 1000 they were actually printed first. The series of 100 was done next, and the large format run last. Because of the larger format the printer had to reimpose the forms, which gave Joyce the opportunity to correct one typo, "borad" to "board" on p. 31, l. 10. S & C. A17.

trust seal
$30,000.00

image of ULYSSES

ULYSSES

Joyce James

Paris: Shakespeare and Co., January 1924. First Edition, the fourth printing. AN IMPORTANT AND RARE COPY INSCRIBED BY JOYCE on a preliminary blank ‘To A.K. Griggs / James Joyce / Paris/ 16.iv [1]934’ With 4 pp. of “Ulysses Additional Corrections” bound in at the end. 8vo, in a French binding of wine-red cloth, the spine with black morocco lettering label gilt, and with a fine slipcase, marbled endleaves, and with the original white wrappers printed in blue bound in. 736 pp. A fine copy, the paper lightly browned overall as is usual with this printing, some marginal tears or chips, primarily at the prelims. THE MOST IMPORTANT NOVEL OF THE TWENTIETH CENTURY. A RARE AND IMPORTANT INSCRIBED COPY OF JOYCE’S MASTERWORK. ULYSSES can be viewed as the pinnacle of the Modernist movement, and its impact on all subsequent western literature is unmistakable. Such writers as Virginia Woolf, John Dos Passos, William Faulkner, Samuel Beckett, Malcolm Lowry, and Anthony Burgess have all paid tribute, consciously or unconsciously, to Joyce's influence. Burgess as well pronounced it the greatest single work in the English literature of this century, and he is not alone in that opinion. According to James Spoerri, "This fortunate combination of printer and publisher resulted in the appearance of ULYSSES as a book whose physical aspect is particularly suited to its content. It is a fat and inviting volume, the blue and white of its covers subtly evocative of the Greece whose epic it so closely parallels" (quoted in the catalogue for the Garden Sale, Sotheby's 1989, first edition, first issue). "Universally hailed as the most influential work of modern times" (Grolier Joyce 69). After working for seven years on Ulysses, Joyce, desperate to find a publisher, turned to Sylvia Beach of Shakespeare and Company in Paris. "Within a month of the publication, the first printing of Ulysses was practically sold out, and within a year Joyce had become a well-known literary figure. Ulysses was explosive in its impact on the literary world of 1922... Then began the great game of smuggling the edition into countries where it was forbidden, especially England and the United States. The contraband article was transported across the seas and national borders in all sorts of cunning ways..." (de Grazia, 27). Arthur Kingsland Griggs, the recipient of this copy of ULYSSES, inscribed by Joyce, lived from 1891-1934. He was editor and translator of Léon Daudet’s MEMOIRS (1925) and the MEMOIRS OF QUEEN HORTENSE (1928). He also published MY PARIS, AN ANTHOLOGY OF MODERN PARIS FROM THE WORKS OF CONTEMPORARY FRENCH WRITERS (1932) and wrote a popular (and often reprinted) guidebook, PARIS FOR EVERYMAN - HER PRESENT, HER PAST & HER ENVIRONS (1926). COPIES OF ULYSSES INSCRIBED BY JOYCE ARE TRULY RARE. THIS IS A HANDSOME AND DESIRABLE COPY OF A CORNERSTONE LITERARY WORK.

trust seal
$27,500.00

image of Ulysses.

Ulysses.

JOYCE, James.

Paris: Shakespeare & Co.,, 1922. Quarto (258 × 200 mm) in eights. Finely bound by the Chelsea Bindery in greenish blue morocco, titles and decoration to spine gilt, raised bands, twin rule to boards gilt, Greek key to turn-ins gilt, japan vellum doublures, top edge gilt, others untrimmed. Housed in a matching leather entry slipcase. A fine copy. First edition, first printing, number 164 of 150 large paper copies numbered between 101 and 250. Ulysses was published in imitation of the traditional three-tiered French format aimed at both connoisseurs and readers: 100 copies were printed on Dutch handmade paper and signed by Joyce; 150 copies were printed on heavier vergé d'Arches to create this large paper format; and the remaining 750 copies formed a small format trade issue, printed on less expensive vergé à barbes stock. With its generous margins, the large paper issue is the most aesthetically pleasing of the three.

trust seal
$26,832.00

image of Ulysses

Ulysses

JOYCE James

1924. Signed. JOYCE, James. Ulysses. Paris: Shakespeare and Company, 1924. Square octavo, contemporary full maroon cloth, black morocco spine label, marbled endpapers; original paper wrappers bound in. Housed in custom slipcase. $25,000.Fourth Shakespeare and Company printing of Ulysses, issued just two years after the first, inscribed on the front flyleaf, “To A.K. Griggs, James Joyce, Paris 16.vi.934.” With original wrappers bound in. Any copies of Ulysses inscribed by Joyce are extremely rare.“Universally hailed as the most influential work of modern times” (Grolier Joyce 69). After working for seven years on Ulysses, Joyce, desperate to find a publisher, turned to Sylvia Beach of Shakespeare and Company in Paris. “Within a month of the publication, the first printing of Ulysses was practically sold out, and within a year Joyce had become a well-known literary figure. Ulysses was explosive in its impact on the literary world of 1922… Then began the great game of smuggling the edition into countries where it was forbidden, especially England and the United States. The contraband article was transported across the seas and national borders in all sorts of cunning ways…” (de Grazia, 27). “Universally hailed as the most influential work of modern times” (Grolier Joyce 69). After working for seven years on Ulysses, Joyce, desperate to find a publisher, turned to Sylvia Beach of Shakespeare and Company in Paris. “Within a month of the publication, the first printing of Ulysses was practically sold out, and within a year Joyce had become a well-known literary figure. Ulysses was explosive in its impact on the literary world of 1922… Then began the great game of smuggling the edition into countries where it was forbidden, especially England and the United States. The contraband article was transported across the seas and national borders in all sorts of cunning ways…” (de Grazia, 27). “The fourth, fifth and sixth printings were issued in white covers with the title and author printed in blue… The fourth and fifth were printed on a thick paper of inferior quality” (Slocum A17). Recipient Arthur Kingsland Griggs edited and translated several works, including Léon Daudet’s Memoirs, and also wrote the popular guidebook Paris for Everyman. Original wrappers bound in.Light embrowning and minor chipping (largely confined to the first few leaves) to fragile text, as usual. Moderate marginal stain to page 33, touching still easily legible text. Minor restoration to inner paper hinge at front flyleaf, barely affecting the “P” of “Paris” in Joyce’s inscription. Copies of Ulysses inscribed by Joyce are extraordinarily rare. A handsome copy, most scarce and desirable inscribed.

trust seal
$25,000.00

image of Ulysses

Ulysses

Joyce, James

Paris: Shakespeare and Company, 1930 First edition, eleventh printing. Presentation copy; signed and inscribed to Martin and Lily O'Connor by Joyce on the half-title: "To Martin and Lily O'Connor, / James Joyce / Wimbledon / Whit Sunday, 1931". Original publisher's teal paper wrappers, lettered in white. Very good, with some wear to the extremities, repairs to spine (see provenance), minor marginal repairs to the first three leaves, and some toning to the otherwise clean pages. Overall, a bright and clean copy. Housed in a custom three-quarter morocco clamshell box. This copy of Ulysses was presented by Joyce to his friends Martin and Lily O'Connor, a wealthy Irish couple living in Wimbledon, London. In addition to owning significant amounts of property in the Wimbledon area, the O'Connors were part of the social elite, and Martin regularly hosted the important literary and political figures of his day, including the Irish novelists Samuel Beckett and James Joyce. The 1930s were a tumultuous time for Joyce, with Sylvia Beach relinquishing her publication rights of Ulysses and both his and his daughter's health failing. As A. Nicholas Fargnoli, Michael Patrick Gillespie explain in their biography, "The family spent much of their time traveling around the continent consulting various specialists." The combination of his physical ailment and new publication responsibilities "made Joyce more reclusive, and he became increasingly dependent on friends like Eugene and Maria Jolas and Lucie and Paul Léon" (James Joyce A to Z: The Essential Reference to the Life and Work p.122). Similarly, Joyce relied on the generosity of Martin and Lily O'Connor during his brief stay in England in 1931. Although he famously never returned to Ireland and seldom returned to the United Kingdom, Joyce resided in Wimbledon for a few months prior to his marriage to his long-term partner Nora Barnacle on the 4th of July. Joyce, a known spendthrift, could not fully financially support himself during this period and so was unable to properly monetarily reimburse the O'Connors for their hospitality. As compensation, he offered this copy of Ulysses to the couple and inscribed it to them May 15th, celebrated by the Christian Church as Whit Sunday or Pentecost. While Martin happily accepted the gift, his wife Lily, considered the book the final link of indecency in a long chain of egregious behavior. More introverted and reserved than her husband, Lily was both scandalized by having such a controversial author as her extended houseguest and exasperated by his inability to provide for himself. According to the O'Connor's nephew Edmund Moriarty, Lily was enraged when Joyce presented her with his explicit novel, which was still banned in all English speaking countries, and "attempted to destroy the book, tearing off the front cover." Luckily, Martin was able to prevent her from causing much more damage, and the book has since been repaired. Considered one of the most important works of Modernist literature, Ulysses was first published serially in The Little Review from March 1918 through December 1920 before the first book edition was published by Sylvia Beach in Paris in 1922. Censored for sexual passages deemed obscene, the text was banned in the United States for over a decade before US Judge John Monro Woolsey lifted the ban on December 6, 1933. Notably the first authorized American edition, published by Random House in 1934, was the first widely available English language edition of Ulysses, which was still banned in England and would not be published until the Bodley Head's 1936 edition. Ulysses is a stream-of-consciousness novel that follows Leopold Bloom through Dublin on the ordinary day June 16, 1904. Joyce chose this date because it was when he went on his first date with Nora Barnacle, who would later become his wife; today June 16th is celebrated by Joycians as Bloomsday, which is often commemorated with public readings of Ulysses.. Inscribed by Author. Soft Cover. Very Good.

trust seal
$25,000.00

image of ULYSSES.

ULYSSES.

JOYCE. JAMES

Shakespeare and Company. Paris. 1922. FIRST EDITION. Number 811 of a limited edition of 1,000 copies and one of 750 copies printed on handmade paper. There were 100 signed copies on thicker Dutch handmade paper numbered 1 - 100 and 150 large paper copies on verge d'Arches numbered 101 - 250 in addition to the 750 copies on handmade paper. Small quarto (235 x 185 mm). Contemporary blue half morocco, spine gilt in compartments with titles direct, blue cloth sides ruled in gilt, top edge gilt, others untrimmed, marbled endpapers. Extremities very lightly rubbed, endleaves a little finger-marked. An excellent copy in an attractive binding.

trust seal
$22,704.00

image of Ulysses.

Ulysses.

JOYCE, James.

Paris: Shakespeare and Company,, 1922. Quarto (235 x 185 mm) in eights. Contemporary blue half morocco, spine gilt in compartments with titles direct, blue cloth sides ruled in gilt, top edge gilt, others untrimmed, marbled endpapers. Extremities very lightly rubbed, endleaves a little finger-marked. An excellent copy in an attractive binding. First edition, first impression. One of 750 copies printed on handmade paper, this number 811. Of the edition of 1,000 copies, in addition to the 750 copies on handmade paper, there were 100 signed copies on thicker Dutch handmade paper numbered 1–100 and 150 large paper copies on vergé d'Arches numbered 101–250.

trust seal
$22,704.00

image of Ulysses.

Ulysses.

Joyce, James

Paris: Shakespeare & Company, 1922. First edition of Joyce's masterpiece. One of 750 numbered copies on handmade paper from a total edition of 1000 copies, this is number 318. Thick quarto, bound in full blue morocco, with the original wrappers bound in. In near fine condition. Ulysses was published in Paris by Shakespeare & Company, 1922. It was a struggle for the author to find a publisher, a comic irony considering that Ulysses is "[u]niversally hailed as the most influential work of modern times" (Grolier Joyce 69). Ulysses was an immediate success. The first printing sold out, and "within a year Joyce had become a well-known literary figure. Ulysses was explosive in its impact on the literary world of 1922" (de Grazia, 27). Even so, the book faced difficulties in global reception. It was banned in the U.K. and was prosecuted for the obscenity in the Nausicaa episode (Ellmann, 1982). Joyce's inspiration for the novel began as a young boy reading Charles Lamb's Adventures of Ulysses and writing an essay entitled "My Favorite Hero" after being impressed by the wholeness of the character (Goreman, 1939). The idea for the novel grew from a story in Dubliners in 1906, which Joyce expanded into a short book in 1907, before reconceptualizing it as the heady novel in 1914 (Ellmann, 1982). The book can initially seem unstructured and chaotic, and Joyce admitted that he "put in so many enigmas and puzzles that it will keep the professors busy for centuries arguing over what I meant" (The Observer, 2000). The French translator Stuart Gilbert published a defense of Ulysses shortly after its publication in which he supported the novel's use of obscenity and explained its internal structure and links to the Odyssey against accusations of ambiguity. Every episode, Gilbert explained, is connected to the Odyssey by theme, technique, and correspondence between characters. Another instance of Ulysses' literary contribution is his use of stream-of-consciousness, a technique employing carefully structured prose, both humorous and charactering, and involving puns and parodies. Joyce was a precursor to the use of stream of consciousness in the later decades. Similar narrative techniques were used by his contemporaries Virginia Wolfe, William Faulkner, and Italo Svevo. Their style can be better characterized as an "interior monologue, rather than stream of consciousness, is the appropriate term for the style in which [subjective experience] is recorded, both in The Waves and in Woolf's writing generally" (Stevenson, 1992).

trust seal
$20,000.00

ULYSSES

JOYCE, JAMES

PARIS: SHAKESPEARE AND COMPANY. NEAR FINE. PUB 1929 (1927). FIRST AMERICAN. SLOCUM/CAHOON #19 /This is a pirated edition that used the legitimate 9th Shakespeare printing of May 1927 / . This is the true First American Edition (unauthorized) of 1929. This pirated edition of the 9th Shakespeare And Company ULYSSES was printed by Adolph & Rudolph Loewinger, 230 West 17th St., New York for Samuel and Max Roth. Of the 2000 -3000 copies printed, many copies of this piracy were seized by "The Society for the Suppression of Vice" on October 5, 1929. One of these pirated copies, sent by Joyce to Bennett A. Cerf of Random House was used in setting up the first authorized American Edition of "ULYSSES". Blue cloth covered boards with "ULYSSES / JOYCE" in gilt on spine. The blue printed wrapped (sans flaps as called for by Slocum.) book was bound into this case binding only loosing the original unprinted spine of the wraps. A beautiful clean and tight copy. .

trust seal
$13,500.00

Ulysses

JOYCE, JAMES

London: John Lane/ The Bodley Head, 1936. First Edition printed in England; trade issue (there was also a vellum-bound issue of 100 numbered and signed copies). Front hinge started; fine in a dust jacket with light wear and creasing; very uncommon in such excellent condition. These elegant, restrained designs by Eric Gill, remain the most beautifully presented edition of Ulysses.

trust seal
$12,500.00

image of Ulysses

Ulysses

Joyce, James

Paris: Shakespeare and Company, 1922. First Edition. Paperback. Very good. 1st edition, 1st issue of 750 copies (the first ones on Feb. 2nd), before the 100 on Dutch paper (Feb. 13th) and the 150 on large paper (Mar. 4th). Original printed paper wrappers, rebacked, one corner, one edge flap, and 5 blank page corners repaired, rear endpaper restored, little chips along the edges, else good condition, complete, and we're being precise, and other depictions are suspiciously vague. 1st editions of Ulysses for what we're asking are gone. The cheapest equivalents start at twice our price and go up from there, and the only thing 4 generations of "1st thus" reprints share in common is declining demand, but a new generation of readers is on the rise. They've heard it's the supreme modernist novel and industrial strength psychological realism, and they're told it was condemned as scandalous erotica, in the days when safe sex meant a padded headboard, and they've read it was stoutly suppressed by authorities fearful of any novel portraying chastity as an unlit lamp, or adult abstinence as malnutrition. But millennials don't care what squares thought about sex 95 years ago, or that from the 1940s to the 1970s Ulysses' meaning was mused upon as a cypher in some language twins teach each other. They just face it as a long and arduous 732 page, 265,000 word legacy, a test of focus, set in turn of the century Dublin, and only worth the effort because it recaptures life in a signally fascinating time and place. So the motivation for reading Ulysses has been protean in each generation, but it always stayed the best of its type, and that flexibility of appeal is the profile of conscious art. Let's try to narrow the gap between you and James Joyce. Here he is on the moon: "Her antiquity in preceding and surviving succeeding tellurian generations: her nocturnal predominance: her satellitic dependence: her luminary reflection: her constancy under all her phases, rising and setting by her appointed times, waxing and waning: the forced invariability of her aspect: her indeterminate response to inaffirmative interrogation: her potency over effluent and refluent waters: her power to enamour, to mortify, to invest with beauty, to render insane, to incite to and aid delinquency: the tranquil inscrutability of her visage: the terribility of her isolated dominant resplendent propinquity: her omens of tempest and of calm: the stimulation of her light, her motion and her presence: the admonition of her craters, her arid seas, her silence: her splendour, when visible: her attraction, when invisible." -Ulysses Ready to read it? Here's a boost. Don't hesitate. Proceed aggressively. If your comprehension lapses-even for pages at a time-it's better to push on seeing as you're going to get lost in the random flux, where things encountered early are not explained until much later, so you'll have to reread it anyway.

trust seal
$11,000.00

image of ULYSSES

ULYSSES

Joyce, James

Paris: Shakespeare and Company, 1927. Oblong octavo. Original blue wrappers. Extremities somewhat shelfworn, with small sliver loss at crown of lower joint, a few creases to spine, otherwise a very good copy. Half morocco folding slipcase, with inner cloth chemise. The 9th printing, printed from the wholly new and corrected setting of type prepared for the eight edition. Inserted in front of this copy (by unknown parties, at a time unknown, and for unknown reasons) is an extra leaf signed by the author: "James Joyce Paris 2-6- 28." SLOCUM & CAHOON A17n.

trust seal
$10,000.00

image of Ulysses

Ulysses

Joyce, James

Paris: Shakespeare and Co, 1925. Octavo. 7th printing. Inscribed by the author and dated Paris, 1926 to the well known artist Ivan Opffer who is remembered for his portraits of writers and other notable figures including James Joyce and it is also inscribed by Ivan Opffer dated Jan. 1927. Joyce's Ulysses went through several printing. The first printing was of 1000 numbered copies, The second printing by the Egoist Press of London printed 2000 copies of which 500 copies were burned by the New York Post Office Authorities. The third printing, of which there were 500 copies printed, 499 of those copies were seized by customs authorities. When Ulysses was first published, there was much controversy over its contents. It was banned in the U.K. and the United States because of the belief it contained too much obscenity ( for the period). Today, it is considered one of the most important works of Modern literature. The present copy is bound in a striking custom brown Niger goatskin binding decorated with an art deco flair of onlays in maroon, lighter brown and black with a portrait of James Joyce from a portrait by Ivan Opffer in blind on cream goatskin framed in turquoise, with gilt signature. Just a bit of toning to page edges otherwise a superb copy with a worthwhile provenance.

trust seal
$9,000.00

image of ULYSSES

ULYSSES

JOYCE, James

New York: Limited Editions Club, 1935. Hardcover. Covers bright with no rubbing to the gilt. Fine in a Fine slipcase and quite uncommon in this condition. Henri Matisse. Large square octavo (9" x 11-1/2") in full brown buckram with a gold embossed design on the front cover and repeated on the spine; 420 pages. With an introduction by Stuart Gilbert and illustrations by Henri Matisse including twenty drawings and 6 ORIGINAL ETCHINGS printed by hand, being the earliest and one of the few instances by Matisse to represent physical agony and violence. Copy #509 of 1500 SIGNED in pencil by the artist on the colophon page.

trust seal
$7,500.00

ULYSSES

Joyce James

London: John Lane, The Bodley Head, 1936. First Edition, English Issuance, First Authorized English edition, one of 900 copies only, printed on special Japon vellum papers, probably the most beautiful First Edition of ULYSSES ever printed. Tall, thick, royal 8vo, publisher’s original full green polished linen buckram with the gilt lettering and pictorial decoration of the gilt bow designed by Eric Gill on the upper cover and spine, top edge gilt. [xvi], 766 pp. A beautifully preserved copy, the covers of the green cloth in bright and beautiful condition without any of the fading typical to the book, the back without the usual fading and only very slight mellowing to the panel. An excellent survival with all aspects of a collector’s demands in good order. A HIGHLY IMPORTANT LITERARY FIRST EDITION, ARGUABLY THE GREATEST WORK OF FICTION OF THE 2OTH CENTURY. This an especially well preserved and pleasing copy of the first authorized English edition. IT IS ALSO THE FIRST EDITION of ULYSSES PRINTED IN GREAT BRITAIN. The superb binding executed in full polished linen buckram has been especially designed for this great book. DESIGNS FOR THE BINDING, EXECUTED IN GILT WERE ACCOMPLISHED BY ERIC GILL, ONE OF THE MOST GIFTED MASTERS OF THE ART. The typeface is extremely attractive and very readable, the printing on fine paper makes the book unusually handsome and presents what is perhaps the most beautiful printing of ULYSSES ever accomplished. Along with the text, there are a series of appendices attached including copies of the International Protest against the unauthorized and mutilated printings of ULYSSES done especially in the United States; a copy of the injunction issued to prevent Samuel Roth from continuing his piracies of ULYSSES; a copy of Joyce’s letter to Bennet Cerf concerning the promotion, legal fight and publication of ULYSSES on the author’s behalf; a copy of the decision of the US District Court which was rendered on December 6, 1933 which lifted the ban on ULYSSES and a copy of the subsequent decision of the US Court of Appeals rendered in August of the following year which upheld the original decision; a copy of the forward to the first American edition and a bibliography of the works of James Joyce. ULYSSES can be viewed as the pinnacle of the Modernist movement, and its impact on all subsequent western literature is unmistakable. Such writers as Virginia Woolf, John Dos Passos, William Faulkner, Samuel Beckett, Malcolm Lowry, and Anthony Burgess have all paid tribute, consciously or unconsciously, to Joyce's influence. Burgess as well pronounced it the greatest single work in the English literature of this century, and he is not alone in that opinion.

trust seal
$5,225.00

image of Ulysses.

Ulysses.

JOYCE, James.

Hamburg: The Odyssey Press,, 1932. Octavo. Original white cloth, titles to upper board and spine in red. With the original cellophane dust jacket, wraparound band, and card slipcase. Spine and endpapers slightly toned. An excellent copy in the rare cellophane dust jacket, wraparound band, and card slipcase. First Odyssey edition single volume issue, the first printing of Ulysses issued in cloth. Stuart Gilbert edited the text of this edition with help from Joyce, and it remains one of the key lifetime printings. A really beautiful copy, scarce in this condition with the cellophane jacket and wraparound band.

trust seal
$5,160.00

image of Ulysses.

Ulysses.

JOYCE, James.

London, John Lane The Bodley Head,, 1936. Thick royal octavo. Finely bound by The Chelsea Bindery in dark blue morocco, titles and decoration to spine gilt, raised bands, twin rule to boards gilt, greek keys to turn-ins gilt, jap vellum doublures and endpapers, top edge gilt, others untrimmed. Housed in a dark blue leather entry slipcase. A fine copy. First UK Edition. The entire edition was limited to 1000 copies only, of which this is one of 900 numbered copies. This was the first issue to be entirely produced in Britain, with an appendix with documents relating to the legal history of Ulysses and with a bibliography.

trust seal
$5,160.00

Ulysses.

JOYCE, James.

London:: John Lane, The Bodley Head,, [1936].. First edition printed in England; No. 847 of 900 copies on Japon vellum. . publisher's green buckram stamped with Homeric bow in gold; in dust jacket.. Very slight browning to extremities of spine; else a fresh bright copy in a price-clipped jacket with some light wear to its extremities and some hand-soiling, particularly to the spine. Uncommon in dust jacket.. Small 4to,.

trust seal
$5,000.00

Ulysses

Joyce, James

Paris: Shakespeare and Company, 1926. This copy contains dozens of lightly-pencilled proof-reading corrections, in what appears to be Stuart Gilbert's handwriting. 8th printing, May 1926. Original wrappers very good. For this last edition to be published by Sylvia Beach, the type was entirely reset. Not all errors were caught, however. The next authorized edition to be printed was the two-volume Odyssey Press edition published in December 1932. As far as we can tell, all the corrections made in our copy were incorporated into that edition, which was edited or proof-read by Stuart Gilbert at Joyce's request. This may well have been one of Gilbert's working copies used in preparation of that text. Alistair McCleery's article, "The Reputation of the 1932 Odyssey Press Edition of Ulysses," in PBSA 100:1 (2006), pp. 89-103, discusses the extent of Gilbert's role in preparing the edition. This copy can be seen to mark a stage in the perfecting of the text of Ulysses.

trust seal
$4,500.00

image of ULYSSES

ULYSSES

Joyce, James

Paris: Published for the Egoist Press, London, by John Rodker, 1922. Small, thick quarto. Original blue and white wrappers. Quarto gathering of errata laid in. Wrappers chipped at spine ends, with partial splits of wrapper joints at extremities, a few light rubs or soft creases to wrappers, a bit of minor foxing to errata and endleaves, but internally very good, and if properly bound, a quite agreeable copy. "First English edition," but more precisely the second impression of the first edition, printed from the largely unaltered plates used for the first impression, and intended for distribution in Britain. Copy #645 of 2000 numbered copies printed on handmade paper (i.e. a copy from the sequence erroneously alleged to have been burnt by US customs). SLOCUM & CAHOON A18. MODERN MOVEMENT 42.

trust seal
$4,500.00

image of Ulysses.

Ulysses.

JOYCE, James.

London: John Lane The Bodley Head,, 1936. Crown octavo. Original green buckram with the Homeric bow device designed by Eric Gill to the front board gilt, top edge gilt, others uncut. With the dust jacket. Head and tail of spine and top edges of boards a touch faded, small bump to bottom edge of rear board. An excellent copy in a chipped, rubbed and tanned jacket. First UK edition. The entire edition was limited to 1000 copies, of which this is number 795 of 900 copies on japon vellum and bound in buckram. The Bodley Head Ulysses established the text for the succeeding 25 years and printed as appendices the International Letter of Protest against Samuel Roth's piracy and the famous legal judgement by John M. Woolsey lifting the ban in America on the publishing of the book.

trust seal
$4,472.00

image of Ulysses [published in Two Worlds Monthly, ed. Samuel Roth].

Ulysses [published in Two Worlds Monthly, ed. Samuel Roth].

JOYCE, James.

New York: Two Worlds Publishing Company, [July 1926–September, 1927]. 11 volumes, octavo. Original white and beige wrappers printed in red and black. Volume II number 4 with the original wrap-around band. A fine set. Unauthorized printing of 13 bowdlerized episodes from Ulysses by the New York publisher Samuel Roth (1893–1974). The set was originally released as 11 individual instalments containing 13 episodes. It was later published as two bound volumes containing 14 episodes including the final instalment (Vol. III, no. 4) that was never released separately and so is not included here. The publisher Samuel Roth was known for publishing sexually explicit literature and other underground material, including a pirated edition of Lady Chatterley's Lover. His pirating of Ulysses "resulted in considerable public indignation and provoked the 'International Protest' signed by 167 artists and writers and printed in transition I" (Slocum & Cahoon p. 100). Joyce was able to obtain an injunction against Roth, but not until after Two Worlds Monthly had already ceased publication. A fine set, exceptionally scarce in this condition.

trust seal
$4,128.00

image of Ulysses.

Ulysses.

Joyce, James

London: Random House, 1934. First American edition. Octavo, original white cloth. Fine in a near fine first state dust jacket with a small closed tear to the back panel and one spot to the spine. A very nice example of this dust jacket which is prone to tanning. In a review in The Dial, T.S. Eliot said of Ulysses: "I hold this book to be the most important expression which the present age has found; it is a book to which we are all indebted, and from which none of us can escape." He went on to asserted that Joyce was not at fault if people after him did not understand it: "The next generation is responsible for its own soul; a man of genius is responsible to his peers, not to a studio full of uneducated and undisciplined coxcombs." Named by Modern Library as one of the 100 greatest novels of the 20th century.

trust seal
$4,000.00

image of ULYSSES

ULYSSES

JOYCE. JAMES.;

John Lane The Bodley Head. London.,1936. FIRST BRITISH EDITION. Large 8vo.(10.3 x 7.9 inches). ONE OF 900 COPIES printed on Japon Vellum paper. This copy number 597, from a total edition of 1000 copies. xvi,768 pp(including blank leaves). Finely bound by Sangorski and Sutcliffe, for Heritage Bookshop of Los Angeles, in recent full dark green morocco. Spine with five raised bands. Compartments lettered in gilt. Gilt reproduction of Eric Gill's Homeric Bow design on the front board. Gilt rule to board edges. Marbled endpapers. Ruled gilt border on inner boards. Top edge gilt, others untrimmed. Housed in a felt lined green cloth slip case. A fine copy of this wonderful edition. The first British edition- Printed in Bristol by Western Printing Services Ltd-, published fourteen years after the books first appearance and including details of the books difficult printing history and a bibliography of Joyce`s works up to date:

trust seal
$4,128.00

Ulysses

JOYCE, James

London: Egoist, 1922. hardcover. very good. Thick large 8vo, original blue wrappers ; front cover detached; spine & edges rubbed. London: Printed for the Egoist Press by John Rodker, 1922. Limited Edition. First English edition, printed in Paris. Number 1516 0f 2000 numbered copies, of which 500 were reportedly destroyed by U.S. Customs. The Errata pages are present. In blue cloth slipcase.

trust seal
$3,800.00

image of Ulysses.

Ulysses.

JOYCE, James.

London: John Lane The Bodley Head,, 1936. Crown octavo (260 x 195 mm). Finely bound by the Chelsea Bindery in green morocco, block design of the bow first designed by Eric Gill gilt to front board, raised bands, titles to spine gilt, gilt roll to turn ins, cream coloured endpapers, top edge gilt, others untrimmed. Some minor spotting to a couple of leaves, an excellent copy in a fine binding. First UK edition, first impression. From a total printing of 1,000 numbered copies, this is one of 900 on japon vellum, unsigned. The Bodley Head Ulysses established the text for the succeeding 25 years and printed as appendices the International Letter of Protest against Samuel Roth's piracy and the famous legal judgement by John M. Woolsey lifting the ban in America on the publishing of the book.

trust seal
$3,784.00

image of Ulysses.

Ulysses.

JOYCE, James.

London: John Lane The Bodley Head,, 1936. Crown octavo. Finely bound by the Chelsea Bindery in green morocco, block design of the bow first designed by Eric Gill gilt to front board gilt, raised bands, titles to spine gilt, twin rule to turn ins, marble endpapers, top edge gilt, others untrimmed. A fine copy. First UK edition, number 883 of 900 copies on japon, unsigned. The Bodley Head Ulysses established the text for the succeeding 25 years and printed as appendices the International Letter of Protest against Samuel Roth's piracy and the famous legal judgement by John M. Woolsey lifting the ban on the publishing of the book in America.

trust seal
$3,784.00

image of Ulysses [published in Two Worlds Monthly, ed. Samuel Roth].

Ulysses [published in Two Worlds Monthly, ed. Samuel Roth].

JOYCE, James.

New York: Two Worlds Publishing Company,, 1927. 2 volumes, octavo. Original red pebble-grain cloth, printed paper labels to spines with limitation statements completed in manuscript, top edges gilt, red endpapers. Title pages printed in red and black. Vol. II inner hinges slightly tender with tape-repair to second leaf of advertisements. An excellent copy. First edition in book form of Samuel Roth's infamous piracy of Ulysses, number 94 of 500 copies produced specially for subscribers and bound from the parts with stab-holes visible. Roth had originally reprinted thirteen bowdlerised episodes from Ulysses across eleven individual instalments in his Two Worlds Monthly serial, Vols. I-III (July 1926 - October 1927), with Vol. III.4, containing the fourteenth episode, and a preface by Roth both appearing here for the first time. Roth was known for publishing sexually explicit literature and other underground material, including a pirated edition of Lady Chatterley's Lover. His pirating of Ulysses "resulted in considerable public indignation and provoked the 'International Protest' signed by 167 artists and writers and printed in transition I" (Slocum & Cahoon p. 100). Joyce was able to obtain an injunction against Roth, but not until after Two Worlds Monthly had already ceased publication. An excellent copy, scarce in this condition.

trust seal
$3,440.00

image of Ulysses

Ulysses

Joyce, James

Random House, 1934 First authorized US edition, fine in a very good dust jacket, first issue jacket with artist's name on front. Housed in a custom-made collector's slipcase.. 1st Edition. Hardcover. Fine/Very Good.

trust seal
$3,000.00

Ulysses

James Joyce

London: John Lane, The Bodley Head. Very Good +/No Jacket. 1936. First Edition. Hardcover. Limited to 1000 copies (900 in this binding, 100 in full vellum) this being copy 275. Large thick 4to in original green linen buckram with the Homeric bow device designed by Eric Gill in gilt on the cover. Top edge gilt, others uncut. Contemporary inscription on the front endpaper has all but completely faded. The spine strip is lighltly evenly faded otherwise a generally fine tight copy. In clear acetate cover. Text block printed on Japan vellum paper, First authorized English edition. 765p .

trust seal
$2,995.00

ULYSSES.

JOYCE, James

JOYCE, James. ULYSSES. (New York):: (Random House),, 1934. First authorized American edition; advance review copy . Owner's late four-line ink inscription on front flyleaf (dated 1977). Bit of very faint, even tanning on spine, two small, faint soil marks on front cover, front hinge has a short closed tear (at lower edge, archivally mended), else a near fine, bright copy. . Laid into the book are the publisher's typed review slip (listing publication date as "January 25, 1934") and publisher's glossy black-and-white promotional photograph of Joyce (by Berenice Abbott) [the photograph depicts Joyce, from the chest up, in three-quarter profile, dressed in a striped shirt, bow-tie and white jacket]. [S&C 21]. Octavo, cloth, pp. xvii, 768.

trust seal
$2,750.00

ULYSSES

JOYCE, JAMES

NEW YORK NY: RANDOM HOUSE. VG+/VG. PUB 1934. FIRST EDITION. BOOK IS VERY NICE WITHOUT ANY MARKS TO THE BINDING OR THE TEXT BUTWITH THE SPINE LIGHTLY TANNED. D.J. IS LIGHTLY WORN AT THE CORNERS, CHIPWORN AT THE SPINE CORNERS, SHALLOW CHIPS TO THE SPINE HEEL SLIGHTLYAFFECTING THE PUBLISHER'S NAME, SPINE PANEL IS SOILED/TANED WITH A FEWEDGE TEARS, AND IS NOT PRICE-CLIPPED. A VERY NICE COPY. THIS COPY ALSOINCLUDES THE RARE POSTER (WHICH MEASURES 22" X 16") PRESENTED WITH THECOMPLIMENTS OF RANDOM HOUSE AND TITLED "HOW TO ENJOY JAMES JOYCE'SULYSSES".. Keywords: IRISH LITERATURE, NOVEL, INVISIBLE, ABCDEF.

trust seal
$2,650.00

image of ULYSSES

ULYSSES

JOYCE, JAMES

1927. Paperback. Fine. JOYCE, James. ULYSSES. Paris: Shakespeare and Company, 1927. The ninth printing. 735pp. A lovely copy in the original wrappers, scarce thus, housed in blue cloth covered custom box. A fine copy.

trust seal
$2,500.00

Ulysses

JOYCE, JAMES

London: Bodley Head, 1936. Olive buckram gilt lettered on spine with gilt bow to front panel (by Eric Gill).Edition limited to 1000 copies of which this is number 361.This is first edition to be printed in England.Top edge gilt.Includes the one page prospectus for this edition. Advertised as the final and definitive edition Wear to the extremities. Spine faded. . 1st UK Limited Edition. Cloth. VG. Large 8vo.

trust seal
$2,500.00

image of Ulysses

Ulysses

JOYCE, James

London: Egoist Press, 1922. Very Good. First English edition. Bound without wrappers in contemporary three-quarter black morocco and papercovered boards. Extremities rubbed and worn, half-title and title page a little smudged, still a nice and sound, very good copy that could use a little polishing. One of 2000 numbered copies. A nice copy of an increasingly scarce edition of one of the most important novels of the 20th Century. Connolly 100.

trust seal
$2,500.00

image of ULYSSES [IN] TWO WORLDS MONTHLY - COMPLETE SERIAL

ULYSSES [IN] TWO WORLDS MONTHLY - COMPLETE SERIAL

Joyce, James

New York: Two World Publishing Company, 1926-1927. Eleven octavo issues (24cm); printed wrappers; variously paged, with publication sequence as follows: Vol.1, Nos.1-4; Vol.2, Nos.1-4; Vol.3, Nos.1-3. All issues showing light overall wear, toning, and dustiness to wrappers, with occasional small nicks and tears to spine ends; wrappers on Vol.2, No.3, and Vol.3, No.1 re-glued at an early date; five issues with trace of soil/damping to upper or lower edges, extending into affected margins no more than 1/2 cm.; Vol.2, No.4 and Vol.3, No.3 with a few splits and tears to joints and spine-fold; chiefly clean internally; Very Good to Very Good+ overall. After finally getting Ulysses published in Paris, Joyce had encountered many problems before his novel finally saw publication by Random House in 1934. Between March 1918 and December 1920, The Little Review attempted to publish Ulysses serially; 23 installments appeared before publication was halted by actions brought by the Society for the Suppression of Vice. All issues were subsequently banned by the U.S. Post Office. As a result of the ban, and in an attempt to capitalize on public interest, publisher and writer Samuel Roth published Ulysses in bowdlerized form 14 episodes in 12 installments of Two Worlds Monthly. Vol.3, No.4 was never issued separately, and is found only in the later issued two volume set bound by the publisher. These reprints were unauthorized by Joyce, and the serialization "resulted in considerable public indignation and provoked the "International Protest" signed by 167 artists and writers and printed in Transition...Joyce's American legal representatives obtained an injunction against Samuel Roth and Two Worlds Publishing Company on December 27, 1928, over a year after Two Worlds Monthly had ceased publication (Slocum & Cahoon, p.100). Additional contributions include works by T.S. Eliot, Ezra Pound, Djuna Barnes, D.H. Lawrence, Stephen Crane, Norman Douglas, and others. An important and contentious debut of the author's most enduring work. Slocum & Cahoon C68; Connolly 100.

trust seal
$2,500.00

image of Ulysses.

Ulysses.

JOYCE, James.

Paris: Shakespeare and Company,, 1926. Small quarto (204 × 163 mm). Contemporary blue half morocco, spines gilt in compartments, blue cloth sides, marbled endpapers, top edge gilt. Original wrappers retained. Binding a little rubbed at extremities, some small spots to cloth, contents toned with occasional small spots and marks. Eight Shakespeare and Company printing, entirely reset. A handsomely bound copy from the library of American novelist Edward Dahlberg (1900–1977), with his ownership inscription to the chapter title of part I, "Edward Dahlberg, September 1926, Paris, France".

trust seal
$2,408.00

Ulysses

JOYCE, James

NY: Random House, 1934. The dust jacket is price-clipped. The book has one small digit number written on the ffep. The jacket shows a light bit of wear to top of spine and top of rear panel. Overall, a VERY nice copy of the first U.S. edition of Joyce's most popular work (stated on the copy right page). There is a date stamp on the rear endpaper of the book (Feb. 03 1934) . . . so the book could be some type of review copy. 768 pp. . First American Edition. Hard Cover. VG++/VG+ - Price-clipped.

trust seal
$2,250.00

Ulysses

JOYCE, James

London: John Lane/Bodley Head, 1936. Limited. hardcover. near fine. Thick 4to, original full green polished linen, with Eric Gill design stamped on front cover, and a gilt top. London: John Lane/Bodley Head, (1936). First edition to be published in England. Number 598 of 900 copies printed on Japon vellum. The spine is faded, as usual. Housed in a custom black cloth slipcase with the Eric Gill Homeric bow on the spine.

trust seal
$2,200.00