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American Locomotives A Pictorial Record of Steam Power, 1900-1950 by  Edwin P Alexander - Hardcover - Later printing - from Americana Books ABAA and Biblio.com

American Locomotives A Pictorial Record of Steam Power, 1900-1950

by Alexander, Edwin P

Condition: Very good/good


New York: Bonanza Books. Later printing. Hardcover. Very good/good. Quarto. 254pp. 98 plates. Hardcover with title and photograph on dust jacket. A few scuff marks on dust jacket lower spine. Previous owner's armorial bookplate on front paste down.


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Glossary

Some terminology that may be used in this description includes:
quarto
The term quarto is used to describe a page or book size. A printed sheet is made with four pages of text on each side, and the p...[more]
spine
The outer portion of a book which covers the actual binding. The spine usually faces outward when a book is placed on a shelf. A...[more]
jacket
Sometimes used as another term for dust jacket, a protective and often decorative wrapper, usually made of paper which wraps aro...[more]
bookplate
Highly sought after by some collectors, a book plate is an inscribed or decorative device that identifies the owner, or former o...[more]

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