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1856 cover & letter from Madeira to Washington DC via the African SS Co \
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1856 cover & letter from Madeira to Washington DC via the African SS Co "Niger & the Cunard Line Canada from England to Boston

By Dt George Clymer

The African Steamship Company was a British shipping line in the 19th and early 20th centuries The company was founded in 1852 by Macgregor Laird, the younger son of the shipbuilder William Laird, and based in Birkenhead. The main focus of the company at first was trading with the Niger River area and other west African ports, bringing west-African palm oil back to Britain. The monthly mail steamer to the then Gold Coast (now Ghana), appointed by Royal Charter, came with a subsidy of 30,000 pounds sterling per year from the British Government, starting from 1852 This is an excellent example of a letter carried on the African SS Co Niger, from Funchai, the capitol of Madeira, which is located off the coast of Africa. . The letter was written by Dr George Clymer, surgeon on the US Frigate, and stationed off San Antonio da Sierra, Madeira in July of 1856. It arrived in Plymouth, England where their cds was applied to the back of the letter, along with a red London transit cds. London debited the US 1.20, as shown on the front of the cover, and sent the letter on to the US via the Cunard Line "Canada" from Liverpool to Boston where the Boston British Pkt cds was applied. At Boston, the debit was increased to 1.40, as the clerk in Boston may have thought this was a ship letter. The letter is from Dr Clymer to his daughter in honor of her birthday.

$250.00

1812 stampless letter carried on the American Privateer Grecian to Annapolis- MD during the war of 1812- rare example of mail carried on a privateer
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1812 stampless letter carried on the American Privateer Grecian to Annapolis- MD during the war of 1812- rare example of mail carried on a privateer

By Samuel W Greene

The Grecian was an American schooner launched in 1812. During the war of 1812 she was issued a letter of Marque. She was captured by a ship of the Royal Navy on Feburary 5th, 1814 and was taken into service as the HMS Grecian. She was designed by Thomas Kemp of Baltimore. She was able to carry 20 guns, but never carried that many. Privateer ships were often used during the War of 1812, intercepting merchant shipping and carrying mail. Over 500 privateers captured 1300 enemy ships during the war. Offered is a stampless letter dated lined Bordeaux, France October 20, 1812, endorsed and carried by the American privateer ship "Grecian. It was addressed to Providence, RI, but the ship arrived at Annapolis MD.where it received a manuscript postmark, and a straight line ship marking. The letter was rated 22 cts in manuscript for the 300-500 mile rate, plus the 2ct ship fee. The letter relates to waiting down the river for a chance to proceed to sea. He writes about invoices, and letters pertaining to trade. This is an excellent example of a letter carried on an American privateer during the war of 1812. The letter was posted 3 weeks prior to the British blockade of the Chesapeake Bay.

$750.00

1803 stampless letter with New York clam shell postmark and manuscript Sh19 ship letter rate
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1803 stampless letter with New York clam shell postmark and manuscript Sh19 ship letter rate

By Benjamin Peirce

Britain declared war on France in 1803, but the US remained neutral from 1803-1806. During this time, the British were seizing British born-US naturalized citizens and forcing them to serve in the British Navy. This form of impressment of US citizens by the British was challenged by Thomas Jefferson, but the British failed to sign the treaty, and gave no concession regarding the matter of impressment. Offered is a stampless letter written by Benjamin Peirce to merchant William Vernon, of Newport, Rhode Island, in 1803. He writes about shipping brandy, and the cost of the brandy. "As soon as the ship is away, I shall return to Nantes and endeavor to get rid of the remainder of the cargo, if not sold before, and close the business. I fear the remainder of the indigo will go low, a large parcel having arrived at L'Orient very lately, but you may rest assured that I will do everything in my power for your advantage" The stampless letter has a black New York clam shell postmark, and a manuscript sh 19 for the 17ct inland postage from New York, to Newport, plus the 2ct ship fee.

$150.00

1797 stampless letter Benjamin Peirce autographed letter signed written at L\'Orient, France to William Vernon of Newport, RI
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1797 stampless letter Benjamin Peirce autographed letter signed written at L'Orient, France to William Vernon of Newport, RI

By Benjamin Peirce

As a result of the XYZ affair, relations with France soured to a point where a Quasi war was declared between the US and France. This stampless letter was written by Benjamin Peirce in L'Orient, France to William Vernon, the famous merchant of Newport, Rhode Island. He writes to Vernon " I wrote you the 21st September advising you of the William & cargo at the commercial tribunal (commercial court) in France & of the appeal of the captors to the civil tribunal at Vannes, but have found means to keep it off, tho expensive, until the commissioners were received, which gives me some distant hope of an acquittal" He writes that he has enclosed a certificate of the landing of the cargo, which could not be done before. He also writes about the cargo loaded onto the William, including sugar. He writes about sending copies of the commercial tribunal to congress, and also to the Vice Consul for the French Republic. " I do not believe all ships under the American flag are American property" Excellent references to the ongoing problems regarding seizure of American ships, leading up to the War of 1812

$250.00

1805 stampless letter with MHead manuscript postmark & mss Ship 19 for carriage to East Haddam Ct
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1805 stampless letter with MHead manuscript postmark & mss Ship 19 for carriage to East Haddam Ct

By Bartlet Shepard

Offered is a wonderful example of a stampless autographed letter carried by private ship into Marblehead, Massachusetts. The letter was placed in the mail, and received a manuscript MHead postmark, and was rated Sh 19, for the 17ct rate to East Haddam Ct, plus the 2ct ship fee for the captain. The captain writes to merchants at East Haddam Ct regarding his time at sea. Halifax November 17, 1805 has been crossed out and At Sea written in it's place. He writes that " I was boarded by the Cambrian Frigate and ordered on board with my papers. After they were examined the captain told me he should detain me and send me to Halifax. My mate and all my men, except the cook was taken out. A prize master mate and seven men put on board and made sail for this place" This letter is an example of events which lead up to the Embargo of 1807, and the War of 1812 HMS Cambrian was a Royal Navy 40 gun fifth rate frigate. She served in the English channel, and off North America. In 1805 Cambrian transferred to the Halifax station, where she harassed French and Spanish Shipping, and captured several privateers and merchantmen.

$800.00

rare 1841 unlisted William Henry Harrison illustrated campaign stampless letter sheet
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rare 1841 unlisted William Henry Harrison illustrated campaign stampless letter sheet

By A W Kinney

A rare unlisted illustrated campaign lettersheet, with images of William Henry Harrison, his cabin, and an eagle, with the imprint P A Mesier, 28 Wall St NY. the inscription under the cabin reads "poor but honest". This design is unlisted in Dr Milgram's book " Presidential campaign illustrated envelopes and etter paper 1840-1872. 1840 was the 1st year that campaign letter sheets were used as campaign material in a presidential election. The 1840 election was a contest between William Henry Harrison, and Martin Van Buren. Harrison won. The letter is datelined Stanhope Iron works, 1841, and was written by AW Kinney to John Simmons, who was the manager of the Ulster Iron Works, based in Saugerties, NY. Mr Kinney has written to Mr. Simmons asking him to quit his job and come to work for the Stanhope Iron works. He writes the correspondence will be in confidence. They are hoping to make pig iron at Stanhope, and writes about bar iron and the 3-5 furnaces, which are filled with coal, and fired up. This is an excellent letter regarding the iron business in Stanhope, NJ, combined with an unlisted political campain design. The stampless folded letter has a f red oval Stanhope, NJ postmark, and a manuscript postal rate.

$300.00