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Turkish No. 3
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Turkish No. 3

By JONES, Owen (1809-74)

London: Day & Son, 1856. Colour-printed lithograph. Very good condition. A fine image from Owen Jones's "The Grammar of Ornament," universally regarded as the classic reference work on Victorian aesthetics, and a visual synopsis of the major forms of decoration from around the world. It was Jones's goal to record for the future the aesthetic motifs of the past in order to enrich the ornamental arts. Indeed, Jones's work was inspirational to William Morris and the Arts and Crafts movement in England and remains today an important source of decorative ornament. Not surprisingly, Jones "was among those who made the selection of objects from the Great Exhibition of 1851, which formed the foundation of the Victoria and Albert Museum's collections" (Susan Lambert ed., Pattern and Design: Designs for the Decorative Arts 1480-1980 ). Cf. Ray England 228.

$240.00

Illuminated Mss No. 3
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Illuminated Mss No. 3

By JONES, Owen (1809-74)

London: Day & Son, 1856. Colour-printed lithograph. Good condition, stain left margin, slightly intruding on image. A fine image from Owen Jones' "The Grammar of Ornament", universally regarded as the classic reference work on Victorian aesthetics, and a visual synopsis of the major forms of decoration from around the world. It was Jones' wish to record for the future the artistic knowledge of the past in order to enrich the progress of Ornamental Art. Indeed, Jones' work was inspirational to William Morris and the Arts and Crafts movement in England and remains today an important source of decorative ornament. Not surprisingly, Jones "was among those who made the selection of objects from the Great Exhibition of 1851 which formed the foundation of the Victoria and Albert Museum's collections" (Susan Lambert ed. Pattern and Design: Designs for the Decorative Arts 1480-1980 ). Cf. Ray England 228.

$240.00

View of Grand Cairo
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View of Grand Cairo

By SALT, Henry (1780-1827)

London: William Miller, 1809. Hand-colored aquatint by D. Havell. Sheet size: 21 1/2 x 29 3/4 inches. In this large panoramic view, Salt demonstrates the appropriateness of the sobriquet, "City of a Thousand Minarets". In the foreground is the great Sultan Hussan Mosque, one of the largest mosques in Cairo. As we look through the streets towards the distant Nile, we see many neighborhood mosques and holy places. Henry Salt, artist, traveller, diplomat and collector of antiquities, was born at Lichfield, Staffordshire, England 14 June 1780. He was destined to be a portrait-painter, and on leaving school was taught drawing by Glover, the watercolour-painter of Lichfield. In 1797 he went to London and became a pupil of Joseph Farington, R.A., and (in 1800) of John Hoppner, R.A. The turning point in his career was 3 June 1802, when Salt left London for an eastern tour with George, viscount Valentia (afterwards Lord Mountnorris), whom he accompanied as secretary and draughtsman. He visited the Cape, India, Sri Lanka, and (in 1805) Abyssinia, returning to England on 26 Oct. 1806. He made many drawings, some of which served to illustrate Lord Valentia's Voyages and Travels to India, published in 1809. The present image is from a work titled Twenty-four Views in St. Helena, the Cape, India, Ceylon, the Red Sea, Abyssinia and Egypt , published by William Miller, with hand-coloured aquatints by D. Havell and J. Bluck from Salt's own drawings. The originals of all these drawings were retained by Lord Valentia, who also retained the ownership of the copper plates after Salt's death. The format and style of presentation of the plates is similar to Thomas and William Daniell's great work, Oriental Scenery (1795-1808), and displays great artistry by both Salt and his engravers.

$3750.00

Mosque at Lucknow
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Mosque at Lucknow

By SALT, Henry (1780-1827)

London: William Miller, 1809. Hand-colored aquatint by John Hill. Sheet size: 21 1/8 x 29 5/8 inches. The Grand Mosque of the Bada Imambara, one of the architectural wonders of India This great Mughal shrine was completed in 1784 by the Nawab of Awadh, Asaf-ud-Daula. Henry Salt, artist, traveller, diplomat and collector of antiquities, was born at Lichfield, Staffordshire, England 14 June 1780. He was destined to be a portrait-painter, and on leaving school was taught drawing by Glover, the watercolour-painter of Lichfield. In 1797 he went to London and became a pupil of Joseph Farington, R.A., and (in 1800) of John Hoppner, R.A. The turning point in his career was 3 June 1802, when Salt left London for an eastern tour with George, viscount Valentia (afterwards Lord Mountnorris), whom he accompanied as secretary and draughtsman. He visited the Cape, India, Sri Lanka, and (in 1805) Abyssinia, returning to England on 26 Oct. 1806. He made many drawings, some of which served to illustrate Lord Valentia's Voyages and Travels to India , published in 1809. The present image is from a work titled Twenty-four Views in St. Helena, the Cape, India, Ceylon, the Red Sea, Abyssinia and Egyp t, published by William Miller, with hand-coloured aquatints by D. Havell and J. Bluck from Salt's own drawings. The originals of all these drawings were retained by Lord Valentia, who also retained the ownership of the copper plates after Salt's death. The format and style of presentation of the plates is similar to Thomas and William Daniell's great work, Oriental Scenery (1795-1808), and displays great artistry by both Salt and his engravers. Abbey Travel II 515 no.3.

$3750.00

[View of the Palace from the Lawn in the Royal Gardens at Kew]
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[View of the Palace from the Lawn in the Royal Gardens at Kew]

By [ROYAL BOTANIC GARDENS, KEW]

[Great Britain, 18th century]. Pen-and-ink and watercolour, on laid paper, inscribed in the upper left corner "Kew Palace to face p. 112." Sheet size: 7 3/4 x 14 1/2 inches. Tipped to a larger 18th century sheet. Early watercolour of His Royal Highness' House at Kew. Along the left side of the image are two potted trees, awaiting planting. This building, referred to as the White House after it was re-modelled and re-surfaced with white stucco by architect William Kent in 1731, was demolished in 1802.

$450.00

The Ashes of Ravana
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The Ashes of Ravana

By DANIELL, Thomas (1749-1840) after James WALES

London: Thos. Daniell R.A. Howland Street Fitzroy Square, 1803. Engraved by and under the direction of Thos. Daniell. Hand-coloured aquatint. Image size: 17 3/4 x 23 1/2 inches. Sheet size: 21 x 29 1/8 inches. A Hindu sanctuary at Ellora in western India The cave known as Ravana-ki Khai is single-storeyed excavation dating from the 7th Century and consists of a square columned mandapa and a verandah. The facade has lost several of its piers revealing the large pillared hall behind. The columns of the hall have pot and foliage capitals and rectangular brackets. Figural panels include Shaivite sculptures on the south wall and Vaishnava images on the north wall. The Daniells' Oriental Scenery is considered to be the finest illustrated works on India. Thomas Daniell and his nephew William spent nine years in India making studies, sketches and drawings of the scenery, architecture, and antiquities that graced the countryside. They then devoted a further thirteen years to publishing their remarkably accurate aquatints. In Britain, the impact was explosive. A cult of Indian architecture, landscaping and interior decoration arose, with the Royal Pavilion at Brighton as its centerpiece. The Daniells gave the English public their first accurate look at the exotic sub-continent. Their great achievement still lies in their ability to blend the picturesque with the real, resulting in images that capture the European taste for the sublime landscape, while still remaining faithful to their subjects. The Daniells brought the romance of the English landscape to the antiquities of India and provided England with an accurate vision of this wondrous country. Consisting of one hundred and forty-four views, published in six parts, the work was issued in seven stages: three sets of twenty-four plates titled Oriental Scenery with title dates of 1795, 1797, and 1801; twelve plates titled Antiquities of India dated 1799; twenty-four plates titled Hindoo Excavations dated 1803; twenty-four plates titled Views in Hindoostan dated 1807; and twelve further plates of Antiquities of India published without a title page in 1808. All plates were engraved by the Daniells and all are taken from their drawings save the twenty-four plates of Hindoo Excavations , which are after drawings by James Wales. Abbey Travel II.420 no.88; cf. Lowndes I, p.588; Martinelli/Michell India Yesterday and today ''140 - Ellora, Ravana-ki Khai'; cf. RIBA 799-804; cf. Sutton The Daniells (1954) p.156; cf. Tooley 172.

$2500.00

Cheval-Pettore in the Tinnevelly District
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Cheval-Pettore in the Tinnevelly District

By DANIELL, Thomas (1749-1840) and William DANIELL (1769-1837)

London: published by Thomas Daniell. Aquatint by and after Thomas & William Daniell, coloured by hand. Image size: 17 5/8 x 23 1/2 inches; sheet size: 21 1/8 x 29 1/8 inches. An impressive 18th century fortification in Souther India This fort, with its circular bastions made of sun-dried mud, was built by the Madurai Nayakas to withstand the incursions of the Nawabs of Arcot in the early 18th Century. It was set in a majestic landscape on the outskirts of the town of Srivilliputtur, dominated by the steep slopes of the Varushanad hills, but it has long ago disappeared. Srivilliputhur is in the Tamil Nadu district of southern India. The Daniells' Oriental Scenery is considered to be the finest illustrated work on India. Thomas Daniell and his nephew William spent nine years in India making studies, sketches and drawings of the scenery, architecture, and antiquities that graced the countryside. They then devoted a further thirteen years to publishing their remarkably accurate aquatints. In Britain, the impact was explosive. A cult of Indian architecture, landscaping and interior decoration arose, with the Royal Pavilion at Brighton as its centerpiece. The Daniells gave the English public their first accurate look at the exotic sub-continent. Their great achievement still lies in their ability to blend the picturesque with the real, resulting in images that capture the European taste for the sublime landscape, while still remaining faithful to their subjects. The Daniells brought the romance of the English landscape to the antiquities of India and provided England with an accurate vision of this wondrous country. Consisting of one hundred and forty-four views, published in six parts, the work was issued in seven stages: three sets of twenty-four plates titled Oriental Scenery with title dates of 1795, 1797, and 1801; twelve plates titled Antiquities of India dated 1799; twenty-four plates titled Hindoo Excavations dated 1803; twenty-four plates titled Views in Hindoostan dated 1807; and twelve further plates of Antiquities of India published without a title page in 1808. All plates were engraved by the Daniells and all are taken from their drawings save the twenty-four plates of Hindoo Excavations , which are after drawings by James Wales. Abbey Travel II.420 no.88; cf. Lowndes I, p.588; Martinelli/Michell India Yesterday and today ''92 Rayakottai, fort'; cf. RIBA 799-804; cf. Sutton The Daniells (1954) p.156; cf. Tooley 172.

$4500.00

Gate of the Loll-Baug, at Fyzabad
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Gate of the Loll-Baug, at Fyzabad

By DANIELL, Thomas (1749-1840) and William DANIELL (1769-1837)

London: Thos. Daniell R. A. Howland Street Fitzroy Square, 1801. Hand-coloured aquatint on heavy wove paper. Image: 17 3/4 x 23 5/8 inches; sheet size: 21 x 29 1/8 inches. A fine example of 18th century Mughal architecture in Uttar Pradesh, near Nepal The print shows the entrance gateway to the Lal Bagh at Faizabad, a pleasure garden established by Shuja' al-Daula (1732-1775). Shuja' al-Daula was ruler (Nawab) of the state of Avadh whose capital was Faizabad. It is built in typical late Mughal style with a plethora of small arches and overhanging balconies with curvilinear roofs. Faizabad was the first capital of the Nawabs of Avadh under Nawabs Burhan al-Mulk and Safdar Jang, before the latter moved it to Lucknow. Shuja' al-Daula moved the capital back to Faizabad from 1765-75 as it was more strategically placed at a time of tension with the East India Company based in Calcutta. The Daniells' Oriental Scenery is considered to be the finest illustrated works on India. Thomas Daniell and his nephew William spent nine years in India making studies, sketches and drawings of the scenery, architecture, and antiquities that graced the countryside. They then devoted a further thirteen years to publishing their remarkably accurate aquatints. In Britain, the impact was explosive. A cult of Indian architecture, landscaping and interior decoration arose, with the Royal Pavilion at Brighton as its centerpiece. The Daniells gave the English public their first accurate look at the exotic sub-continent. Their great achievement still lies in their ability to blend the picturesque with the real, resulting in images that capture the European taste for the sublime landscape, while still remaining faithful to their subjects. The Daniells brought the romance of the English landscape to the antiquities of India and provided England with an accurate vision of this wondrous country. Consisting of one hundred and forty-four views, published in six parts, the work was issued in seven stages: three sets of twenty-four plates titled Oriental Scenery with title dates of 1795, 1797, and 1801; twelve plates titled Antiquities of India dated 1799; twenty-four plates titled Hindoo Excavations dated 1803; twenty-four plates titled Views in Hindoostan dated 1807; and twelve further plates of Antiquities of India published without a title page in 1808. All plates were engraved by the Daniells and all are taken from their drawings save the twenty-four plates of Hindoo Excavations , which are after drawings by James Wales.

$4500.00

The Punj Mahalla Gate, Lucknow
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The Punj Mahalla Gate, Lucknow

By DANIELL, Thomas (1749-1840) and William DANIELL (1769-1837)

London: Thos. Daniell R. A. Howland Street Fitzroy Square, 1801. Hand-coloured aquatint on heavy wove paper, image size: 18 1/8 x 23 3/4 inches, sheet size: 21 x 29 1/9 inches. A distinguished and unusual example of Mughal architecture This monumental gateway, which shows the fish emblem of the Nawabs of Avadh on the spandrels, used to lead to the palace of Nawab Shuja' al-Daula in Lucknow. It was mostly built by him and his father Safdar Jang round an earlier fortification in the period 1752-65 . The ramp within the gateway was for allowing elephants' easy access to the inner courtyard. The gateway is built in a simple and solid architectural style, typical of the Late Mughal style of Lucknow of this period. The Daniells' Oriental Scenery is considered to be the finest illustrated works on India. Thomas Daniell and his nephew William spent nine years in India making studies, sketches and drawings of the scenery, architecture, and antiquities that graced the countryside. They then devoted a further thirteen years to publishing their remarkably accurate aquatints. In Britain, the impact was explosive. A cult of Indian architecture, landscaping and interior decoration arose, with the Royal Pavilion at Brighton as its centerpiece. The Daniells gave the English public their first accurate look at the exotic sub-continent. Their great achievement still lies in their ability to blend the picturesque with the real, resulting in images that capture the European taste for the sublime landscape, while still remaining faithful to their subjects. The Daniells brought the romance of the English landscape to the antiquities of India and provided England with an accurate vision of this wondrous country. Consisting of one hundred and forty-four views, published in six parts, the work was issued in seven stages: three sets of twenty-four plates titled Oriental Scenery with title dates of 1795, 1797, and 1801; twelve plates titled Antiquities of India dated 1799; twenty-four plates titled Hindoo Excavations dated 1803; twenty-four plates titled Views in Hindoostan dated 1807; and twelve further plates of Antiquities of India published without a title page in 1808. All plates were engraved by the Daniells and all are taken from their drawings save the twenty-four plates of Hindoo Excavations , which are after drawings by James Wales. jpg.

$4000.00

Mausoleum of Amir Khusero at the ancient City of Delhi
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Mausoleum of Amir Khusero at the ancient City of Delhi

By DANIELL, Thomas (1749-1840) and William DANIELL (1769-1837)

London: published byThomas Daniell. Hand-coloured aquatint on heavy wove paper. Image size: 17 5/8 x 23 1/2 inches; Sheet size: 21 29 1/8 inches. Mis-identified by the Daniell's, this fine Mughal monument was the Chausath Khamba built by Mirza Aziz Koka (c. 1542-1624) for himself in 1623-24. This mausoleum was misidentified by the Daniells as the tomb of the celebrated Delhi poet Amir Khusrau, which lies nearby in the shrine complex of Nizamuddin. It is in fact the tomb of Mirza 'Aziz Koka, foster brother of the Emperor Akbar, (Koka means foster brother), who died in 1624. It is one of the earliest of a new type of Mughal tomb, the flat-roofed hypostyle hall, here encased in white marble, with white marble jalis or pierced screens around the sides. It is known as the Chaunsath Kambha or '64 pillars': it consists of 6 by 6 bays, with pillars doubled round the periphery, and quadrupled at the corners. The Daniells' Oriental Scenery is considered to be the finest illustrated works on India. Thomas Daniell and his nephew William spent nine years in India making studies, sketches and drawings of the scenery, architecture, and antiquities that graced the countryside. They then devoted a further thirteen years to publishing their remarkably accurate aquatints. In Britain, the impact was explosive. A cult of Indian architecture, landscaping and interior decoration arose, with the Royal Pavilion at Brighton as its centerpiece. The Daniells gave the English public their first accurate look at the exotic sub-continent. Their great achievement still lies in their ability to blend the picturesque with the real, resulting in images that capture the European taste for the sublime landscape, while still remaining faithful to their subjects. The Daniells brought the romance of the English landscape to the antiquities of India and provided England with an accurate vision of this wondrous country. Consisting of one hundred and forty-four views, published in six parts, the work was issued in seven stages: three sets of twenty-four plates titled Oriental Scenery with title dates of 1795, 1797, and 1801; twelve plates titled Antiquities of India dated 1799; twenty-four plates titled Hindoo Excavations dated 1803; twenty-four plates titled Views in Hindoostan dated 1807; and twelve further plates of Antiquities of India published without a title page in 1808. All plates were engraved by the Daniells and all are taken from their drawings save the twenty-four plates of Hindoo Excavations, which are after drawings by James Wales.

$4000.00

A View at Delhi, near the Mausoleum of Humaioon
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A View at Delhi, near the Mausoleum of Humaioon

By DANIELL, Thomas (1749-1840) and William DANIELL (1769-1837)

London: published by Thomas Daniell. Aquatint by and after Thomas & William Daniell, coloured by hand. Image size: 17 7/8 x 23 3/4; 21 1/8 x 29 1/8 inches. The mausoleum of Humayun is one of the great Mughal monuments The plain around the Mausoleum of Humayun, now within the modern city of New Delhi, was covered when this building was erected with the remains of tombs, forts, mosques and palaces from the earlier dynasties of the Delhi Sultanate (1193-1527). The tomb of Humayun (reg. 1530-40, 1555-56), the second Mughal emperor, and father of Akbar, was built by his wife after his death from 1565 - 1572. It represents the first example of the Mughal garden-tomb complex, a monumental symmetrical composition set in a walled garden enclosure, meant to adumbrate Paradise as described in the Koran. The gate on the extreme left in this aquatint is the principal entrance to the mausoleum. The Daniells' Oriental Scenery is considered to be the finest illustrated works on India. Thomas Daniell and his nephew William spent nine years in India making studies, sketches and drawings of the scenery, architecture, and antiquities that graced the countryside. They then devoted a further thirteen years to publishing their remarkably accurate aquatints. In Britain, the impact was explosive. A cult of Indian architecture, landscaping and interior decoration arose, with the Royal Pavilion at Brighton as its centerpiece. The Daniells gave the English public their first accurate look at the exotic sub-continent. Their great achievement still lies in their ability to blend the picturesque with the real, resulting in images that capture the European taste for the sublime landscape, while still remaining faithful to their subjects. The Daniells brought the romance of the English landscape to the antiquities of India and provided England with an accurate vision of this wondrous country. Consisting of one hundred and forty-four views, published in six parts, the work was issued in seven stages: three sets of twenty-four plates titled Oriental Scenery with title dates of 1795, 1797, and 1801; twelve plates titled Antiquities of India dated 1799; twenty-four plates titled Hindoo Excavations dated 1803; twenty-four plates titled Views in Hindoostan dated 1807; and twelve further plates of Antiquities of India published without a title page in 1808. All plates were engraved by the Daniells and all are taken from their drawings save the twenty-four plates of Hindoo Excavations , which are after drawings by James Wales. Abbey Travel II.420 no.88; cf. Lowndes I, p.588; Martinelli/Michell India Yesterday and today ''92 Rayakottai, fort'; cf. RIBA 799-804; cf. Sutton The Daniells (1954) p.156; cf. Tooley 172.

$5000.00

Ruins at Cannouge [Kannauj]
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Ruins at Cannouge [Kannauj]

By DANIELL, Thomas (1749-1840) and William DANIELL (1769-1837)

London: published byThomas Daniell, 1802. Hand-colored aquatint on heavy wove paper. Image size: 17 5/8 x 23 5/8 inches; Sheet size: 21 x 29 1/8 inches. A highly atmospheric depiction of a once splendid capital Kannauj, the ancient city of Kanyakubja, the capital of the Emperor Harshavardhana (early 7th century) and later of the Pratihara dynasty (mid-7th to the 11th centuries), had by the early 15th century become an important Muslim city, part of the Sultanate of Jaunpur. The Jami' Masjid or Congregational Mosque in Kannauj was converted from former Hindu buildings in the period 1400-06 by Sultan Ibraham Shah of Jaunpur. The Daniell print shows the relatively unadorned front of the half ruined prayer hall with its pointed arches and polygonal columns typical of Muslim architecture in India before the arrival of the Mughals, although the richly carved corbels supporting the mostly vanished chajja or heavy eave are typically Hindu. Facing the mosque is an ancient tomb. The Daniells' Oriental Scenery is considered to be the finest illustrated works on India. Thomas Daniell and his nephew William spent nine years in India making studies, sketches and drawings of the scenery, architecture, and antiquities that graced the countryside. They then devoted a further thirteen years to publishing their remarkably accurate aquatints. In Britain, the impact was explosive. A cult of Indian architecture, landscaping and interior decoration arose, with the Royal Pavilion at Brighton as its centerpiece. The Daniells gave the English public their first accurate look at the exotic sub-continent. Their great achievement still lies in their ability to blend the picturesque with the real, resulting in images that capture the European taste for the sublime landscape, while still remaining faithful to their subjects. The Daniells brought the romance of the English landscape to the antiquities of India and provided England with an accurate vision of this wondrous country. Consisting of one hundred and forty-four views, published in six parts, the work was issued in seven stages: three sets of twenty-four plates titled Oriental Scenery with title dates of 1795, 1797, and 1801; twelve plates titled Antiquities of India dated 1799; twenty-four plates titled Hindoo Excavations dated 1803; twenty-four plates titled Views in Hindoostan dated 1807; and twelve further plates of Antiquities of India published without a title page in 1808. All plates were engraved by the Daniells and all are taken from their drawings save the twenty-four plates of Hindoo Excavations , which are after drawings by James Wales.

$3500.00

View of Mutura, on the River Jumna
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View of Mutura, on the River Jumna

By DANIELL, Thomas (1749-1840) and William DANIELL (1769-1837)

London: published by Thomas Daniell. Aquatint by and after Thomas & William Daniell, coloured by hand. Image size: 17 7/8 x 23 1/2; Sheet size: 21 1/8 x 29 1/8 inches. This view of the ancient city of Mathura, one of the seven holy cities of Hinduism, is taken from a garden pavilion on the opposite bank of the river Jumna [Yamuna River]. Mathura is particularly associated wtih the exploits of the Hindu god Krishna. The principal buildings visible are the fort built by Raja Man Singh of Amber at the beginning of the 17th century, and the Jami Masjid with its four minarets, which was erected 1660-1668 by Aurangzeb's governor 'Abd al-Nabi Khan. Mathura is in the Uttar Pradesh state, northwest of Agra, in northeastern India. The Daniells' Oriental Scenery is considered to be the finest illustrated works on India. Thomas Daniell and his nephew William spent nine years in India making studies, sketches and drawings of the scenery, architecture, and antiquities that graced the countryside. They then devoted a further thirteen years to publishing their remarkably accurate aquatints. In Britain, the impact was explosive. A cult of Indian architecture, landscaping and interior decoration arose, with the Royal Pavilion at Brighton as its centerpiece. The Daniells gave the English public their first accurate look at the exotic sub-continent. Their great achievement still lies in their ability to blend the picturesque with the real, resulting in images that capture the European taste for the sublime landscape, while still remaining faithful to their subjects. The Daniells brought the romance of the English landscape to the antiquities of India and provided England with an accurate vision of this wondrous country. Consisting of one hundred and forty-four views, published in six parts, the work was issued in seven stages: three sets of twenty-four plates titled Oriental Scenery with title dates of 1795, 1797, and 1801; twelve plates titled Antiquities of India dated 1799; twenty-four plates titled Hindoo Excavations dated 1803; twenty-four plates titled Views in Hindoostan dated 1807; and twelve further plates of Antiquities of India published without a title page in 1808. All plates were engraved by the Daniells and all are taken from their drawings save the twenty-four plates of Hindoo Excavations , which are after drawings by James Wales. Abbey Travel II.420 no.88; cf. Lowndes I, p.588; Martinelli/Michell India Yesterday and today ''92 Rayakottai, fort'; cf. RIBA 799-804; cf. Sutton The Daniells (1954) p.156; cf. Tooley 172.

$4500.00

The Gold Temple of the principal Idol Guadma, taken from its front being the Eastern face of the Great Dagon Pagoda at Rangoon
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The Gold Temple of the principal Idol Guadma, taken from its front being the Eastern face of the Great Dagon Pagoda at Rangoon

By MOORE, Lieutenant Joseph, [and Captain Frederick MARRYAT]

London: Kingsbury & Co. and Thomas Clay, 1825. Hand-coloured aquatint plates engraved by G. Hunt after Moore. Very good condition apart from some light soiling. A beautiful plate from Moore's book "Eighteen Views taken at & Near Rangoon," an important visual record of the Burmese countryside and scenery, and of the war between the Burmese and British in 1824 to 1826. Following Burmese incursions into British held territory in 1821-1823 (including the successful invasion of Assam), the Governor-General, Lord Amherst, declared war on Burma on February 24, 1824. The British were successful in expelling the Burmese from Assam, but Bandula, the ablest of the Burmese generals, repelled a British detachment at Ramu on the Chittagong frontier. In reply, the British sent an expedition of 11,000 men under Major-General Archibald Campbell and ships under Captain Frederick Marryat to attack Rangoon by sea. The expedition resulted in the capture of Rangoon on May 11, 1824, with the Burmese forces fleeing into jungles of Pegu. Meanwhile, Bandula had been recalled and arrived in Rangoon on December 1 with 60,000 men. He was, however, defeated on December 15 and then retreated to Donabew, where, after a brave defence, he was killed in April 1825. On April 25, Campbell captured Prome, the capital of Lower Burma. The fighting continued sporadically throughout the rest of 1825 and into 1826, until a peace treaty was signed on February 24. Joseph Moore, a Lieutenant in the 89th Regiment, includes images that begin with the departure of Campbell's invasion force and conclude in July 1824. They are a finely balanced mixture of eye-witness battle scenes with a number of very fine views of the countryside and buildings in and around Rangoon. Frederick Marryat's involvement in the conflict began in March 1823 when he "commissioned the Larne for service in the East Indies, where he arrived in time to take an active part in the first Burmese war. From May to September 1824 he was senior naval officer at Rangoon, and was officially thanked for his able, gallant, and zealous co-operation with the troops. The very sickly state of the ship obliged him to go to Penang, but by the end of December he was back at Rangoon, and in February 1825 he had the naval command of an expedition up the Bassein River, which occupied Bassein and seized the Burmese magazines. [It was during this period that he made the sketches worked up into the plates in the second part of the present work]." ( DNB ) Abbey Travel II, 404; Tooley 334.

$1250.00

Île de Éléphantine. Vue du Temple du Sud
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Île de Éléphantine. Vue du Temple du Sud

By [DESCRIPTION DE L'EGYPTE]

Paris, 1830. Copper engraving after Balzac by Bertault. Very good condition. A fine plate from 'Description de l'Egypte', the seminal publication by the French government detailing the results of the Napoleon's pioneering military and scientific expedition to Egypt (1798-1801) and the first comprehensive illustrated description of ancient and modern Egypt. In 1798, Napoleon embarked on his legendary expedition to Egypt with the ambition of wresting control of the region from the Turkish Empire and 'opening' the enigmatic kingdom to the West. Conquering Egypt, the geographical centerpoint in the axis of trade between Europe, India and the East, was an integral part of Bonaparte's strategic plan for global domination. Among the numerous civilians accompanying him, were the 'savants', leading French scholars, artists, scientists, engineers and technicians, whom he commissioned to compile a thorough survey of every aspect of Egypt that could later be used in planning the country's future shape. The survey was divided into various sections detailing the antiquities, modern architecture, natural history and topography of Egypt and coordinated by the 'l'Institut de l'Egypte' with a view to publication. Following the defeat of the French army, the 'savants' returned to France where a committee was established to edit and supervise the work's production. Begun under Napoleon in 1809, 'Description de l'Egypte' was finally completed in 1830. Although not a military success, the expedition and the resultant 'Description', were a scientific and cultural triumph considered by many to be the "Birth of Egyptology". Prior to Napoleon's invasion, access to and knowledge of Egypt, its culture and antiquities, were limited to the objects brought to Europe by the Romans and nineteenth-century merchants. The exquisite plates from this voluminous and invaluable work provided the first true glimpse into a once mysterious land and indelibly influenced how the west perceived Egypt.

$250.00

Île d'Éléphantine et Syene 1. Vue de L'Île et des Environs. 2. Vue de Syene. 3. Vue d'un rocher de granit portant les traces de l'exploitation
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Île d'Éléphantine et Syene 1. Vue de L'Île et des Environs. 2. Vue de Syene. 3. Vue d'un rocher de granit portant les traces de l'exploitation

By [DESCRIPTION DE L'EGYPTE]

Paris, 1830. Copper engraving after Jollois & Devilliers and (3) Jomard by Baltard and (3) Monsaldy. Very good condition. A fine plate from 'Description de l'Egypte', the seminal publication by the French government detailing the results of the Napoleon's pioneering military and scientific expedition to Egypt (1798-1801) and the first comprehensive illustrated description of ancient and modern Egypt. In 1798, Napoleon embarked on his legendary expedition to Egypt with the ambition of wresting control of the region from the Turkish Empire and 'opening' the enigmatic kingdom to the West. Conquering Egypt, the geographical centerpoint in the axis of trade between Europe, India and the East, was an integral part of Bonaparte's strategic plan for global domination. Among the numerous civilians accompanying him, were the 'savants', leading French scholars, artists, scientists, engineers and technicians, whom he commissioned to compile a thorough survey of every aspect of Egypt that could later be used in planning the country's future shape. The survey was divided into various sections detailing the antiquities, modern architecture, natural history and topography of Egypt and coordinated by the 'l'Institut de l'Egypte' with a view to publication. Following the defeat of the French army, the 'savants' returned to France where a committee was established to edit and supervise the work's production. Begun under Napoleon in 1809, 'Description de l'Egypte' was finally completed in 1830. Although not a military success, the expedition and the resultant 'Description', were a scientific and cultural triumph considered by many to be the "Birth of Egyptology". Prior to Napoleon's invasion, access to and knowledge of Egypt, its culture and antiquities, were limited to the objects brought to Europe by the Romans and nineteenth-century merchants. The exquisite plates from this voluminous and invaluable work provided the first true glimpse into a once mysterious land and indelibly influenced how the west perceived Egypt.

$150.00

Koum Omboû (Ombos).Vue du Grand Temple
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Koum Omboû (Ombos).Vue du Grand Temple

By [DESCRIPTION DE L'EGYPTE]

Paris, 1830. Copper engraving after Cécile by Baltard. Very good condition. A fine plate from 'Description de l'Egypte', the seminal publication by the French government detailing the results of the Napoleon's pioneering military and scientific expedition to Egypt (1798-1801) and the first comprehensive illustrated description of ancient and modern Egypt. In 1798, Napoleon embarked on his legendary expedition to Egypt with the ambition of wresting control of the region from the Turkish Empire and 'opening' the enigmatic kingdom to the West. Conquering Egypt, the geographical centerpoint in the axis of trade between Europe, India and the East, was an integral part of Bonaparte's strategic plan for global domination. Among the numerous civilians accompanying him, were the 'savants', leading French scholars, artists, scientists, engineers and technicians, whom he commissioned to compile a thorough survey of every aspect of Egypt that could later be used in planning the country's future shape. The survey was divided into various sections detailing the antiquities, modern architecture, natural history and topography of Egypt and coordinated by the 'l'Institut de l'Egypte' with a view to publication. Following the defeat of the French army, the 'savants' returned to France where a committee was established to edit and supervise the work's production. Begun under Napoleon in 1809, 'Description de l'Egypte' was finally completed in 1830. Although not a military success, the expedition and the resultant 'Description', were a scientific and cultural triumph considered by many to be the "Birth of Egyptology". Prior to Napoleon's invasion, access to and knowledge of Egypt, its culture and antiquities, were limited to the objects brought to Europe by the Romans and nineteenth-century merchants. The exquisite plates from this voluminous and invaluable work provided the first true glimpse into a once mysterious land and indelibly influenced how the west perceived Egypt.

$250.00

Erment (Hermonthis). Vue du Temple prise au sud-ouest
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Erment (Hermonthis). Vue du Temple prise au sud-ouest

By [DESCRIPTION DE L'EGYPTE]

Paris, 1830. Copper engraving after Cécile by Lienard, aquatint by Desmaisons. Very good condition. A fine plate from 'Description de l'Egypte', the seminal publication by the French government detailing the results of the Napoleon's pioneering military and scientific expedition to Egypt (1798-1801) and the first comprehensive illustrated description of ancient and modern Egypt. In 1798, Napoleon embarked on his legendary expedition to Egypt with the ambition of wresting control of the region from the Turkish Empire and 'opening' the enigmatic kingdom to the West. Conquering Egypt, the geographical centerpoint in the axis of trade between Europe, India and the East, was an integral part of Bonaparte's strategic plan for global domination. Among the numerous civilians accompanying him, were the 'savants', leading French scholars, artists, scientists, engineers and technicians, whom he commissioned to compile a thorough survey of every aspect of Egypt that could later be used in planning the country's future shape. The survey was divided into various sections detailing the antiquities, modern architecture, natural history and topography of Egypt and coordinated by the 'l'Institut de l'Egypte' with a view to publication. Following the defeat of the French army, the 'savants' returned to France where a committee was established to edit and supervise the work's production. Begun under Napoleon in 1809, 'Description de l'Egypte' was finally completed in 1830. Although not a military success, the expedition and the resultant 'Description', were a scientific and cultural triumph considered by many to be the "Birth of Egyptology". Prior to Napoleon's invasion, access to and knowledge of Egypt, its culture and antiquities, were limited to the objects brought to Europe by the Romans and nineteenth-century merchants. The exquisite plates from this voluminous and invaluable work provided the first true glimpse into a once mysterious land and indelibly influenced how the west perceived Egypt.

$250.00

Koum Omboû. (Ombos) Vue perspective des deux temples et de l'enceinte
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Koum Omboû. (Ombos) Vue perspective des deux temples et de l'enceinte

By [DESCRIPTION DE L'EGYPTE]

Paris, 1830. Copper engraving after Jollois et Devilliers by Testard. Very good condition. A fine plate from 'Description de l'Egypte', the seminal publication by the French government detailing the results of the Napoleon's pioneering military and scientific expedition to Egypt (1798-1801) and the first comprehensive illustrated description of ancient and modern Egypt. In 1798, Napoleon embarked on his legendary expedition to Egypt with the ambition of wresting control of the region from the Turkish Empire and 'opening' the enigmatic kingdom to the West. Conquering Egypt, the geographical centerpoint in the axis of trade between Europe, India and the East, was an integral part of Bonaparte's strategic plan for global domination. Among the numerous civilians accompanying him, were the 'savants', leading French scholars, artists, scientists, engineers and technicians, whom he commissioned to compile a thorough survey of every aspect of Egypt that could later be used in planning the country's future shape. The survey was divided into various sections detailing the antiquities, modern architecture, natural history and topography of Egypt and coordinated by the 'l'Institut de l'Egypte' with a view to publication. Following the defeat of the French army, the 'savants' returned to France where a committee was established to edit and supervise the work's production. Begun under Napoleon in 1809, 'Description de l'Egypte' was finally completed in 1830. Although not a military success, the expedition and the resultant 'Description', were a scientific and cultural triumph considered by many to be the "Birth of Egyptology". Prior to Napoleon's invasion, access to and knowledge of Egypt, its culture and antiquities, were limited to the objects brought to Europe by the Romans and nineteenth-century merchants. The exquisite plates from this voluminous and invaluable work provided the first true glimpse into a once mysterious land and indelibly influenced how the west perceived Egypt.

$250.00

Environs d'Esné (Latopolis) Vue Perspective du Temple au Nord d'Esné
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Environs d'Esné (Latopolis) Vue Perspective du Temple au Nord d'Esné

By [DESCRIPTION DE L'EGYPTE]

Paris, 1830. Copper engraving after Jollois & Devilliers by Lorieux, aquatint by Rousseau. Very good condition. A fine plate from 'Description de l'Egypte', the seminal publication by the French government detailing the results of the Napoleon's pioneering military and scientific expedition to Egypt (1798-1801) and the first comprehensive illustrated description of ancient and modern Egypt. In 1798, Napoleon embarked on his legendary expedition to Egypt with the ambition of wresting control of the region from the Turkish Empire and 'opening' the enigmatic kingdom to the West. Conquering Egypt, the geographical centerpoint in the axis of trade between Europe, India and the East, was an integral part of Bonaparte's strategic plan for global domination. Among the numerous civilians accompanying him, were the 'savants', leading French scholars, artists, scientists, engineers and technicians, whom he commissioned to compile a thorough survey of every aspect of Egypt that could later be used in planning the country's future shape. The survey was divided into various sections detailing the antiquities, modern architecture, natural history and topography of Egypt and coordinated by the 'l'Institut de l'Egypte' with a view to publication. Following the defeat of the French army, the 'savants' returned to France where a committee was established to edit and supervise the work's production. Begun under Napoleon in 1809, 'Description de l'Egypte' was finally completed in 1830. Although not a military success, the expedition and the resultant 'Description', were a scientific and cultural triumph considered by many to be the "Birth of Egyptology". Prior to Napoleon's invasion, access to and knowledge of Egypt, its culture and antiquities, were limited to the objects brought to Europe by the Romans and nineteenth-century merchants. The exquisite plates from this voluminous and invaluable work provided the first true glimpse into a once mysterious land and indelibly influenced how the west perceived Egyp.

$250.00

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