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Gladiolus Cuspidatus / Glayeul en Pointe [Undulated Painted Lady]
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Gladiolus Cuspidatus / Glayeul en Pointe [Undulated Painted Lady]

By REDOUTÉ, Pierre-Joseph (1759-1840)

Paris: Imprimerie de Didot jeune, 1802. Stipple engraving, printed in colour and finished by hand, engraved by Langlois. Pierre-Joseph Redouté was one of the world's great flower painters. Born into a family that had been painters for at least two generations, Redouté went to Paris in 1782 with his brother where they worked as scene painters for the Théâtre italien. Redouté painted flowers in his spare time. The search for subjects led him to the Jardin du Roi and eventually Gerard van Spaendonck who made him an assistant. While at the Jardin du Roi, Redouté came to know Charles-Louis L'Heritier, an amateur botanist and writer of independent means. He gave Redouté a full time job as an illustrator, instructing him in plant anatomy. Redouté's understanding of plants contributed greatly to the clarity of his depictions. But it was Redouté's work in stipple engraving and colour printing that was to be of the greatest importance. Stippling and the application of two or three colour inks to one plate were engraving innovations that Redouté brought to French printmaking, and these were brought to perfection in Les Liliacées from which this work comes. Les Liliacées is one of two Redouté masterworks, the other being Les Roses . These works demonstrate the appropriateness of the accolade "Raphael of Flowers", for one is constantly impressed by the exquisite compositional sense and clarity of vision. More than with any other painter, one sees in Redouté's flowers living, breathing beings at their most beautiful moment. Cf. Nissen BBI 1597; cf.Great Flower Books (1990), p 128; cf. Dunthorne p 231; cf. Stafleu & Cowan TL2 8747; cf. MacPhaeil, Redouteana, 10.

$1500.00

Flores Poetici. The Florist's Manual: designed as an introduction to vegetable physiology and systematic botany fo cultivators of flowers

By BOURNE, Hermon

Boston: Munroe and Francis; New York: Charles S. Francis, 1833. 8vo. 288pp., with 73 hand-coloured illustratrations. Scattered minor foxing. Publisher's green cloth, rebacked with the original spine laid down Provenance: Isabella Batchelder (contemporary inscription) Early American amateur florist's manual with colored plates. Intended for those seeking to study botany as a past-time rather than from a serious scientific perspective, Bourne's manual provides descriptions of of over 100 flowers, with general comments on taxonomy, classification and more. Each charming, hand colored illustratration is accompanied by verse. Rare and not listed in the usual bibliographies.

$2400.00

Plantarum Horti Eystaettensis Classis Verna [Titlepage to Section on Spring Flowers]
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Plantarum Horti Eystaettensis Classis Verna [Titlepage to Section on Spring Flowers]

By BESLER, Basil (1561-1629)

Eichstatt, 1613. Black & white engraving. Printed on laid paper. In fair condition with the exception of some expertly mended tears along the margins. Bottom right corner has been infilled. Left edge of sheet has been made up. Image size: 18 3/8 x 15 1/4 inches. An early first edition of the titlepage to the section on spring flower, from Besler's celebrated botanical book "Hortus Eystettensis". Basil Besler published "Hortus Eystettensis", the earliest large folio botanical, at Eichstatt near Nuremburg, in 1613. He worked on the drawings for the 374 copper engravings over a period of sixteen years using the plants in the garden of Bishop Johann Conrad von Gemmingen, his patron. Depicted in this florilegium were flowers, herbs, vegetables and newly discovered plants such as tobacco and peppers. Besler was, in modern terms, a botanist and horticulturalist, and he was familiar with real and alleged medicinal properties of various plants. Besler had the good fortune to live at a time when exotic plants were being shipped to Europe from all over the world. The garden that he organized and illustrated for his patron was both ornamental and experimental, and the large book he had engraved after his drawings was unique. The prints, made by a team of master engravers, are strong and exquisitely done.

$1500.00

[Hyacinths] Hyacinthus candidissimus pleno flore [Hyacinth]; Hyacinthus Orientalis serotinus erectis candidis floribus [Common Hyacinth]; Hyacinthus Orientalis serotinus erectis et coeruleis floribus [Common Hyacinth]; Hyacinthus Orientalis flore coeruleo pleno [Common Hyacinth]; Hyacinthus Orientalis serotinus mixtus [Garden Hyacinth]
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[Hyacinths] Hyacinthus candidissimus pleno flore [Hyacinth]; Hyacinthus Orientalis serotinus erectis candidis floribus [Common Hyacinth]; Hyacinthus Orientalis serotinus erectis et coeruleis floribus [Common Hyacinth]; Hyacinthus Orientalis flore coeruleo pleno [Common Hyacinth]; Hyacinthus Orientalis serotinus mixtus [Garden Hyacinth]

By BESLER, Basil (1561-1629)

Eichstatt, 1640. Hand-coloured engraving. Basil Besler published "Hortus Eystettensis", the earliest large folio botanical, at Eichstatt near Nuremburg, in 1613. He worked on the drawings for the 374 copper engravings over a period of sixteen years using the plants in the garden of Bishop Johann Conrad von Gemmingen, his patron. Depicted in this florilegium were flowers, herbs, vegetables and newly discovered plants such as tobacco and peppers. Besler was, in modern terms, a botanist and horticulturalist, and he was familiar with real and alleged medicinal properties of various plants. Besler had the good fortune to live at a time when exotic plants were being shipped to Europe from all over the world. The garden that he organized and illustrated for his patron was both ornamental and experimental, and the large book he had engraved after his drawings was unique. The prints, made by a team of master engravers, are strong and exquisitely done.

$2250.00

The Theory and Practice of Gardening: wherein is fully handled all that relates to fine gardens commonly called pleasure-gardens, as parterres, groves, bowling-greens, &c. ... Done from the French original ... By John James
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The Theory and Practice of Gardening: wherein is fully handled all that relates to fine gardens commonly called pleasure-gardens, as parterres, groves, bowling-greens, &c. ... Done from the French original ... By John James

By [DEZALLIER D'ARGENVILLE, Antoine Joseph (1680-1765)] -- John JAMES (d.1746, translator)

London: printed by Geo. James, and sold by Maurice Atkins, 1712. Quarto. (10 x 7 3/4 inches). [14], 218, [2]pp. Title in red and black, royal license leaf facing the title, 4pp. list of subscribers. 32 folding engraved plates by Michael van der Gucht, 16 woodcut illustrations. Contemporary speckled calf, expertly rebacked to style Provenance: armorial bookplate The first edition in English of this important work, described by Henrey as the "first important book on garden design to appear in England in the eighteenth century" and by a contemporary critic as the best work on gardening "that has appeared in this or any other language." "The first important book on garden design to appear in England in the eighteenth century is The theory and practice of gardening , a translation of the French La théorie et la pratique du jardinage ... it is especially valuable as a record of the manner of gardening as practised by [André] Le Notre. The original French work appeared anonymously in Paris in 1709, and in the opinion of [M.L.] Gothein: 'Never before did a book lay down the principles of any style so surely and so intelligibly in instructive precepts' ... The translator [of the present English version] was the noted London architect John James (d. 1746) ... he tells us that he endeavoured to make his translation 'as plain and intelligible, as possible', and he certainly succeeded in this ... [The present work] deals fully with the design and formation of fine gardens ... and with the making of parterres, mazes, garden buildings, and ornaments of every kind. It also deals with the making of fountains, basins, and cascades ... [It includes a description] for the first time in England [of] the use of a fosse or deep ditch as an invisible division between the garden and the landscape beyond, a device now known as a 'ha-ha' and especially associated with the English landscape school" (Blanche Henrey, British Botanical and Horticultural Literature before 1800 , II, p490-495). Bradley Bibliography III, p.112 (under 'Le Blond'); Harvard, Catalogue of the Library of the Arnold Arboretum p.416 (under 'Le Blond'); cf. Hunt II, 421 (French edition) and 471 (1728 English edition); Henrey III, 1426; Nissen BBI 1136.

$3750.00

Flora Virginica exhibens plantas quas... in Virginia crescents observavit collegit & obtulit

By GRONOVIUS, Johannes Fridericus (1686-1762); and John CLAYTON (1693-1773)

Leiden, 1762. 4to. [12], 176, [8]pp. Engraved folding map. Errata on verso terminal leaf. Contemporary manuscript annotations throughout. Uncut. Contemporary flexible blue paper covered boards, expertly rebacked to style. Housed in a blue morocco backed box. Provenance: J. Davis Second and best edition of the first Virginian flora, based on specimens collected by John Clayton at the beginning of the 18th century; this edition the first to include a map of Virginia. The first London edition of 1739- 43 of Gronovius' work, based on Clayton's specimens, comprised the first systematic flora of Virginia and was responsible for establishing many new genera. John Clayton had an estate on the Piankatank River in Mathews County, spent much time in collecting Virginia plants, particularly in the middle tidewater region. Clayton corresponded with J.F. and L.T. Gronovius, Linnæus, Kalm, Collinson, and Bartram. "Because Clayton's herbarium specimens formed the basis of this work, it is often asserted that it should be called 'Clayton's Flora Virginica,' but the final identification of the specimens, the science and system of the book, were largely the work of Gronovius" (Hunt). The map is "one of the earliest botanical maps of any region of the world" (Maps in Virginia). The map further documents Clayton's travels, "which show that he was seldom north of the Rappahannock or south of the James, and that his knowledge of the mountains did not extend beyond the Blue Ridge. He was thorough, however, in his exploration of the middle Tidewater districts, and recent botanical work shows that as a field botanist he was more astute than has been realized" (DAB). A lovely copy of an important Virginia flora. Sabin 28924; Pritzel 3607; Hunt 571; JCB I, 1316; Stafleu & Cowan TL2 2189; Stephenson and McKee, Maps in Virginia p.106.

$9500.00

The Orchids of New England and New York. Photographed from Life and Published by Edwin Hale Lincoln [manuscript title]
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The Orchids of New England and New York. Photographed from Life and Published by Edwin Hale Lincoln [manuscript title]

By LINCOLN, Edwin Hale (1848-1938)

Pittsfield, Massachusetts, 1930. 3 volumes, folio. (14 x 11 inches). Manuscript title in each vol., manuscript preface in vol. 1), and manuscript lists of plates in each vol. with both Latin nomenclature and common names. 81 platinum photographs, each tipped to cream Japanese vellum and mounted to larger gray sheets, each image captioned in manuscript. Contemporary red half morocco and red cloth covered boards, spines with raised bands in six compartment, lettered in the second and fourth, the others panelled in gilt A unique photographically-illustrated work on the orchids of the eastern United States. This remarkable collection of photographs reveals Lincoln's vision, his skill as a photographer using a large camera and his superb craftmanship producing difficult and time-consuming platinum prints. Unsurprisingly, Lincoln developed strong connections with the American Arts & Crafts movement, and his work appeared in several issues of Gustave Stickley's The Craftsman. Lincoln was a pioneer and his photographs can be viewed as elegant examples of the modernist photographs produced in the 1920s and 1930s by Imogen Cunningham, Edward Weston, Ansel Adams, and other members of the loosely associated Group f/64. A proto-conservationist, Lincoln was pains-taking in his attempts to photograph each specimen without further endangering the species: with this in mind he would carefully dig up the selected plant, wrap the roots in moss, and return to his studio. Here he replanted his finds, allowing them to continue to grow until they reached their peak. He then took the required photograph using only the natural light from a window in his studio, taking only a single exposure of each plant which was quickly developed and printed by hand on platinum paper. After the exposure was made, the plant was returned unharmed to the spot in the woods where he had found it. This care and attention to the individual plants well-being seems to have suffused the resulting images, which are true "portraits" of individual flowers and plants. The large negatives obviated the need for enlargements. Lincoln insisted upon platinum paper as the best medium to convey the subtleties of his delicate subjects. "This series of plates includes, with one exception, a life-size print on platinum of every orchid known to grow in the United States east of the Mississippi and north of the parallel of Washington. The scientific nomenclature is that of Professor Oakes Ames, prepared in 1924 for the American Orchid Society. All plates are made to scale and each print is mounted on hand made cream Japanese vellum which in turn is mounted on a gray Japanese vellum of the same quality. This is the first publication comprising the full series" (Preface). Edwin Hale Lincoln (1848-1938) was born in Westminster, Massachusetts. Following service in the Civil War as a drummer boy and work as a page in the Massachusetts House of Representatives, he entered the photographic profession in Brockton in 1876. His early work included photographing yachts under full sail and documenting large estates. He visited Lenox initially in 1883 and moved permanently to the Berkshire area ten years later. His move coincided with the height of the development of Berkshire's "Summer Cottages," and Lincoln photographed many of these grand structures in the following years. Also at the end of the 19th-century, Lincoln began what was to become his best known work: an extensive study of New England wild flowers, all photographed with a large-format view camera. Self-published between 1910 and 1914 in sixteen parts, the eight volumes of this magnificent work consisted of 400 platinum prints on individual mounts with printed captions, and titled Wild Flowers of New England Photographed from Nature. The present 3-volume work, with manuscript titles dated 1930 and complete with 81 plates, would appear unique. In 1931, Hale would publish a similar 2-volume work containing 84 images and with printed lists of plates and titles, Orchids of the North Eastern United States . Only three examples of that work are known (Yale [formerly the Massachusetts Horticultural Society copy], University of Chicago, and the State Library of Massachusetts). Cf. William B. Becker "Permanent Authentic Records: The Arts & Crafts Photographs of Edwin Hale Lincoln," in History of Photography: an International Quarterly, vol. 13, no. 1, January 1989; cf. Keith Davis An American Century of Photography: From Dry-Plate to Digital , second edition, (Kansas City, 1999), pp. 57-58; cf. Lisa Bush Hankin'No Record So True': The Wildflower Photographs of Edwin Hale Lincoln, 1848-1938, September 19-October 26, 20O2.(Richard York Gallery Exhibition Catalogue); cf. A Persistence of Vision: photographs by Edwin Hale Lincoln . (Lenox, Ma., 1981). (Lenox Library Association / Berkshire Museum Exhibition Catalogue).

$45000.00

Hints addressed to proprietors of orchards, and to growers of fruit in general, comprising observations on the present state of the apple trees, in the cider countries ... also the natural history of the aphis lanata or American blight and other insects destructive to fruit trees
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Hints addressed to proprietors of orchards, and to growers of fruit in general, comprising observations on the present state of the apple trees, in the cider countries ... also the natural history of the aphis lanata or American blight and other insects destructive to fruit trees

By SALISBURY, William

London: Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme and Brown, 1816. 12mo. [3]-188pp. 2 engraved folding plates. Without the half-title. Contemporary half calf and marbled paper covered boards. First edition. Salisbury was a pupil of, and later partner and successor to, William Curtis, operating a botanic garden on Sloane Street, Chelsea. (See The Gentleman's Magazine, 18 August 1810, vol. LXXX, part the second, pp. 113-114 for a description and engraved plan of the garden). The present work was written following several years travel among the fruit growers of Herefordshire and following Salisbury's purchase of the stock of Thomas Andrew Knight's nursery. Salisbury gives particular attention in this work to the insects which prove most destructive to fruit trees.

$500.00

Observations on the Barrenness of Fruit Trees, and the Means of Prevention and Cure
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Observations on the Barrenness of Fruit Trees, and the Means of Prevention and Cure

By LYON, Peter

Edinburgh: Printed by C. Stewart for William Blackwood, 1813. 8vo. [4], 80, [16]pp. Engraved frontispiece. Half title. Publisher's ads in rear. Foxing. Contemporary marbled paper covered boards, rebacked with cloth at an early date Scarce treatise on fruit trees by a Scottish apothecary. Lyon, according to Loudon, served as an apothecary and physic gardener at Comely-garden, Edinburgh. This was his first published work, followed three years later by A Treatise on the Physiology and Pathology of Trees. Here, Lyon attributes barrenness of fruit trees to vermin, constriction of bark and superabundant blossoms and gives various solutions to each.

$550.00

The Complete Gard'ner; Or, directions for cultivating and right ordering of fruit-gardens and kitchen gardens ... Now Compendiously Abedg'd, and made more Use with very considerable additions ... Fifth Edition Corrected
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The Complete Gard'ner; Or, directions for cultivating and right ordering of fruit-gardens and kitchen gardens ... Now Compendiously Abedg'd, and made more Use with very considerable additions ... Fifth Edition Corrected

By LA QUINTINYE, Jean de (1624-1688) - LONDON, George (c.1640-1714); and Henry WISE (1653-1738)

London: Printed for Andrew Bell, 1710. 8vo. [2], xxxvi, 325, [7]pp. Engraved frontispiece and 10 engraved folding plates. Contemporary panelled calf, spine with raised bands in six compartments Provenance: H. Middleton (early signature on verso of the frontispiece); Richard Middleton (signature on endpaper) Influential English edition of the most important work by the leading French gardener of the seventeenth century: based on the translation by John Eveyln. In 1693, John Evelyn translated La Quintinie's Instruction pour les jardins fuitiers , first published in Paris in 1690. "Evelyn's Compleat Gard'ner was not reprinted. This handsome folio volume with its portrait frontispiece and many copper-plate engravings must have been an expensive book to produce and also costly to purchase ... The astute Mr. London and Mr. Wise, however, appear to have realized that a book based on this work and condensed so as to present only the most useful information would be of greater value to the practical gardener, and at the same time have a much wider popular appeal" (Henrey). London and Wise's edition was indeed popular; first published in 1699, at least five subsequent editions were published by 1717. "This shorter version was obviously the main vehicle for the spread of La Quintinie's methods in England, where his influence lasted well into the next century" (Oak Spring Pomona). London and Wise "built up Brompton Park to be the foremost nursery garden in the country. Furthermore, they became the leading garden designers of the period ... Chatsworth, Castle Howard, and Melbourne are but three of the famous gardens with which these men's names are associated" (Henrey). Henrey 223; ESTC T142667; Raphael, Oak Spring Pomona 3.

$950.00

A Treatise on the Culture and Management of Fruit-Trees ... The Fifth Edition, Corrected
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A Treatise on the Culture and Management of Fruit-Trees ... The Fifth Edition, Corrected

By FORSYTH, William (1737-1804)

London: Lomgman, Hurst, Rees, Orme and Brown, 1810. 8vo. xxviii, 522pp. Frontispiece portrait, 13 engraved folding plates. Contemporary half calf and marbled paper covered boards, flat spine tooled in gilt, red morocco lettering piece, front joint starting, marbled endpapers A classic work on all aspects of growing fruit trees. 'William Forsyth was one of that legion of Scottish gardeners who spent their working lives south of the border. His career began at Chelsea Physic Garden and continued at Syon House, until he returned to Chelsea in 1771 to take over the care of the garden from Philip Miller ... [In 1784] he took charge of the royal gardens at St James's and Kensington. His eminence in the gardening world made him one of the founder members of the Royal Horticultural Society' ... [His Treatise on the Culture and Management of Fruit-Trees] ran through seven editions in twenty-two years" (Oak Spring Pomona). Raphael, Oak Spring Pomona 37 (1818 edition).

$350.00

The Gardeners Kalendar, Directing what Works are necessary to be done every month, in the Kitchen, Fruit and Pleasure Gardens, and in the Conservatory ... the Third Edition
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The Gardeners Kalendar, Directing what Works are necessary to be done every month, in the Kitchen, Fruit and Pleasure Gardens, and in the Conservatory ... the Third Edition

By MILLER, Philip (1691-1771)

London: for the Author, and sold by C. Rivington, 1734. 8vo. xv, [1], 278, [8]pp. Frontispiece engraved by J. Pine. Minor dampstaining to frontispiece and first few leaves. Nineteenth century green patterned cloth, red morocco lettering piece One of the earliest and most well-regarded of the gardener's "Kalendars." This popular work by Miller, the most well known 18th century English horticulturalist before Arthur Young, first published in 1732, went through fifteen editions in the author's lifetime. This 1734 third edition is described on the title as "with a large Index and an addition of the work necessary to be done in the nursery in each month." Henrey 1129; ESTC T59407.

$550.00

Arator; Being a Series of Agricultural Essays, Practical and Political ... Third Edition, Revised and Enlarged
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Arator; Being a Series of Agricultural Essays, Practical and Political ... Third Edition, Revised and Enlarged

By TAYLOR, John

Baltimore: Printed by J. Robinson for John M. Carter, 1817. 12mo. 220pp. Contemporary tree sheep, flat spine ruled in gilt, red morocco lettering piece. Provenance: Edward R. Custis (early signature) Early American work on agriculture and slavery. Styled "third edition, revised and enlarged" on the titlepage (after the first edition of 1814), this strongly political and ideological work by the greatest of the agrarian states' rights theorists is devoted to the slavery issue, political and constitutional philosophy, and practical agricultural advice. This edition is the first to contain Taylor's essays on "Cotton," "Hay & Fodder," and "The Present and Political State of Agriculture." This edition also contains Taylor's final revisions to his important "Essays on Agrarian Philosophy." Rink 1182; Shaw & Shoemaker 42250; Sabin 94484.

$380.00

The Epitome of the Art of Husbandry ... by J. B. Gent
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The Epitome of the Art of Husbandry ... by J. B. Gent

By [BLAGRAVE, Joseph (1610-1682)]

London: Printed for Benjamin Billingsley, 1670. Two parts in one, 8vo. [4], 306, [14]; [8, including engraved additional title to the second part], 59, [5], [2]pp. Publisher's ads in the rear. With the 4pp. Table to the second part bound in following the title (between Aa1 and Aa2). Contemporary calf, covers and spine ruled in blind, early reparis to the upper cover corners. Scarce English 17th century work on husbandry. This work is ascribed to Blagrave, a noted 17th century astrologist and authority on the practice of physic, as it was edited by his nephew Obadiah Blagrave (according to DNB), a London bookseller, who along with Benjamin Billingsley first published the first part of the work in 1669. The second part, titled New Additions to the Art of Husbandry, first appeared in the present first combined edition. Bibliographies make no mention of the engraved additional title to the second part, present here, and no such additional title was evidently issued for the first part until the following edition of 1675. Wing B3116; ESTC R33215; cf. Goldsmiths 2580. Not in Fussell or Henrey.

$2750.00

A Treatise on Fruit-Trees ... Second Edition
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A Treatise on Fruit-Trees ... Second Edition

By HITT, Thomas. (d. 1770)

London: Printed for the Author, 1757. 8vo. viii, 392, [8]pp. 7 engraved plates (6 foldiing). Old repaired tears to folding plates. Contemporary calf, covers ruled in gilt, spine with raised bands in six compartments, red morocco lettering piece An important 18th century work on the care of fruit trees. Thomas Hitt was gardener to Lord Robert Manners. "Thomas Hitt, a gardener in private service [to Lord Robert Manners] who later became a nurseryman, published in 1755 A Treatise of Fruit-Trees which long remained the best practical work upon the art of pruning and training trees" (Henrey). "His book, which ran into three London editions and a Dublin one within fifteen years, included directions for the packing and safe transport of trees from their nurseries 'to places remote from whence they are raised'" (Oak Spring Pomona). The plates are engraved by Thomas Jefferys. Bradley III, 441; Henrey 848; Raphael, Oak Spring Pomana 24.

$850.00

On the Portraits of English Authors on Gardening with Biographical Notices ... Second Edition, with considerable additions
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On the Portraits of English Authors on Gardening with Biographical Notices ... Second Edition, with considerable additions

By FELTON, Samuel

London: Published by Effingham Wilson, 1830. 8vo. (8 3/4 x 5 1/4 inches). xxxviii, [2],221, [1]pp. Extra-illustrated with small, trimmed portraits of John Tradescant the Elder and John Tradescant the Younger, after Hollar. Later half green dyed calf and marbled paper covered boards, bound by Sizer, spine with raised bands in six compartments, lettered in gilt, blue endpapers Provenance: Cripps-Day, Francis Henry (gilt armorial stamp on bottom of spine); Charles A. Ward (armorial bookplate) A fine extra-illustrated copy of a noted early 19th century work on the history of gardeners and English landscape design. On these 18th century portraits of the Tradescants, see New Hollstein (German) 1430 and 1431.

$350.00

An Olde Thrift Newly Revived. Wherein is Declared the Manner of Planting, Preserving, and Husbanding Yong Trees of Divers Kindes for Timber and Fuell
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An Olde Thrift Newly Revived. Wherein is Declared the Manner of Planting, Preserving, and Husbanding Yong Trees of Divers Kindes for Timber and Fuell

By [CHURCHE, Rocke]

London: Printed by W[illiam] S[tansby] for Richard Moore, 1612. Small 4to. (6 7/8 x 5 1/8 inches). Largely printed in black letter. [6], 108, [4]pp. Folding woodcut plate, woodcut illustrations and diagrams. Trimmed close at fore-edge touching a few letters. Modern burgundy crushed morocco, covers panelled in blind, spine with raised bands, lettered in gilt and tooled in blind First edition: early English work on the planting of trees and their use for timber. Published anonymously by R.C. (and with the preface signed R. Ch.), the work is sometimes attributed to Robert Chambers or R. Churton. Henrey, however, suggests that as the work was written by a surveyor, it seems more likely to have been Rocky Church, who served as the King's surveyor to Lord Salisbury. The work, written in the form of a dialogue between a surveyor, woodsman, gentleman and farmer, sought to improve practices the author felt led to scarcity and waste. The work is illustrated with a large folding woodcut plate of an instrument used to measure "boord, or any solide, round or square bodie, be it Timber, stone, glasse, or any such like, and also to take the heighth of a Tree, or of any thing else" bound between pages 74 and 75, followed by further necessary diagrams, tables, and formulas for calculating these measurements. STC 4923; Fussell I, p.33; Henrey 29.

$12500.00

Hortus Gramineus Woburnensis: or, an Account of the Results of Experiments on the Produce and Nutrititive Qualities of Different Grasses and other Plants used as the food of the more valuable domestic animals; instituted by John, Duke of Bedford
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Hortus Gramineus Woburnensis: or, an Account of the Results of Experiments on the Produce and Nutrititive Qualities of Different Grasses and other Plants used as the food of the more valuable domestic animals; instituted by John, Duke of Bedford

By SINCLAIR, George (1787-1834)

London: James Ridgway, 1824. 8vo. 60 hand coloured plates, printed by Hullmandel. Contemporary half calf and marbled paper covered boards, flat spine elaborately tooled in gilt First octavo edition and the the first edition with hand coloured plates: and an imporant proto-Darwinian work of evolutionary botany. "On instructions from the Duke, and under the direction of Sir Humphry Davy, Sinclair [gardener to the Duke of Bedford] conducted an extensive series of experiments on the nutritive qualities of various types of animal fodder. The results were published in 1816 in Hortus Gramineus Woburnensis, an expensive folio volume containing dried specimens of the grasses. These were replaced by plates in [subsequent editions] ... The nutritional value of the grasses described in Hortus was assessed through comparison of their water-soluble constituents, the theory being that these formed the bulk of the feeding material. As a comparative guide, the technique did have some value" (ODNB). Interestingly, Sinclair's work would have a profound influence on Charles Darwin, who refers to Sinclair's experiments with soil and various grasses in On the Origin of Species in his explanation of the principle of divergence, i.e. how natural selection favors diverging ecological requirements of cohabitating species within the same area. See Andy Hector and Rowan Hooper, "Darwin and the first ecological experiment," Science Magazine 295, no. 5555 [25 Jan. 2002]: 639-40. Nissen 1850.

$750.00

Certaine Experiments Concerning Fish and Fruite
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Certaine Experiments Concerning Fish and Fruite

By TAVERNER, John

London: William Ponsonby, 1600. Small 4to. Printer's woodcut device on title, woodcut initials, printed mostly in blackletter, A1 and F4 blanks both present. Later red morocco, bound by Riviere, covers panelled in gilt, spine lettered in gilt, marbled endpapers, gilt edges. Housed in a red chemise and red morocco backed box. Provenance: Henrick Cunliffe (bookplate); Arthur Howard Thompson (bookplate) Rare first edition: a noted early English practical contribution to angling and horticultural literature. Taverner's only publication, based on his experiments in stocking a fish pond and cultivating apples and pears. "Good Reader," Taverner begins, "in seeking to shun that monster idleness, and having a desire by all honest means possible, to benefit this my native countrie of England, and finding my abilitie otherwise insufficient to performe the same, I have thought good to set down some experiments that my selfe have had concerning fish and fruite." Taverner was the son of Roger Taverner, surveyor general of the King's woods south of the Trent, and he succeeded his father to that position. Much of his work is devoted to the making of fish-ponds, the breeding of fish, and the best baits for catching them, but the second part provides directions for planting orchards and cultivating fruit trees. The work is very rare and unknown to much of the usual horticultural literature, including Henrey, Hunt, Oak Spring Pomona, etc. STC records but four known copies (not including the present). This example, complete with both integral front and rear blanks, from the celebrated library of Henry Cunliffe, was sold by Sotheby's in 1946 for £120 and resold in 1968 for $1,560. The work was reprinted by the Derrydale Press in 1928. Litchfield 1; Gee 102; Heckscher 1895; STC 23708 (citing but four known copies); Westwood & Satchell 205.

$17500.00

Illustrations of Himalayan Plants, chiefly selected from drawings made for the late J.F.Cathcart Esq. of the Bengal Civil Service
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Illustrations of Himalayan Plants, chiefly selected from drawings made for the late J.F.Cathcart Esq. of the Bengal Civil Service

By HOOKER, Sir Joseph Dalton (1817-1911)

London: Lovell Reeve, 1855. Folio. (20 x 14 3/4 inches). Half-title. 2pp. subscriber's list. Lithographic title with hand-coloured botanical border, 24 hand-coloured lithographic plates by and after Walter Hood Fitch from original drawings by native artists and the author. Minor foxing in the rear mostly affecting text and tissue guards, one plate toned. Publisher's patterned cloth boards, rebacked with the original spine laid down, floral patterned endpapers. Housed in a cloth box. Hooker's second work on Himalayan plants containing some of the most spectacular work of Walter Hood Fitch, arguably the greatest botanical artist of the second half of the 19th century: "one of the finest flower books ever produced" (Jan Lewis). In the eloquent and evocative introduction to the present work, Hooker writes that he wished the work to stand as a monument to the botanical contributions of James F. Cathcart (1802-1851). Cathcart, during the lengthy period when he suffered from ill-health, spent his time assiduously recording the flora of the Himalayas, and with the help of native artists assembled a series of nearly one thousand drawings of the plants of the remote region. The original plan had been for Cathcart to have given Hooker £1000 to pay for "a work similar to the Sikkim-Himalaya Rhododendrons, and to distribute it to the principal botanists and scientific establishments in Europe." Having sent his collection of drawings ahead to Hooker, Cathcart died in Lausanne during his journey back to Britain. The work subsequently appeared in its present form: partly through subscription (176 names are listed) and partly after Cathcart's family agreed to honour his promise of financial support for the work. The plates were re-drawn and transferred to stone by Fitch who "corrected the stiffness and want of botanical knowledge displayed by the native artists." In addition Fitch worked from a number of drawings supplied by Hooker himself of alpine plants found at greater elevation than Mr. Cathcart was able to visit. In his introduction, Hooker readily acknowledges the importance of Fitch's beautiful images "that have been justly pronounced as of unrivalled excellence in an artistic point of view" and makes the general point that "works like the present must appeal to the lovers of art and horticulture" in equal measure. The combined efforts of Hooker, Fitch and Cathcart produced "probably the finest plates of Magnolia Campbellii and Meconopsis simplicifolia ever made, as well as other important Himalayan plants" ( Great Flower Books ). Great Flower Books (1990) p.101; Jan Lewis Walter Hood Fitch A celebration 1992, p.16; Nissen BBI 910; Stafleu & Cowan TL2 2973.

$18000.00

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