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Coloured Engravings of Heaths. The drawings taken from the living plants only. With the appropriate specific character, full description, native place of growth, and time of flowering of each; in Latin and English. Each figure accompanied by accurate dissections of the several parts, (magnified where necessary,) upon which the specific distinction has been founded, according to the Linnean system
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Coloured Engravings of Heaths. The drawings taken from the living plants only. With the appropriate specific character, full description, native place of growth, and time of flowering of each; in Latin and English. Each figure accompanied by accurate dissections of the several parts, (magnified where necessary,) upon which the specific distinction has been founded, according to the Linnean system

By ANDREWS, Henry Charles (fl. 1799-1828)

London: printed by T. Bensley [vol.I] or R. Taylor [vols.II-IV] for the Author, 1830. 4 volumes, folio. (16 1/8 x 10 3/8 inches). Half-title to vol.IV. 288 hand-coloured engraved plates by and after Andrews, printed in green or black, some heightened with gum Arabic. (Bound without the engraved dedication to the Marquis of Blandford and the one-leaf letterpress introduction). Vols.I-III: contemporary uniform diced Russia; vol.IV: bound to match in about 1830, covers with decorative borders in gilt and blind, spines in six compartments with wide raised bands, the bands highlighted in gilt and blind, lettered in gilt in the second, third, fourth and fifth compartments, the first and sixth compartments with repeat decoration in gilt, gilt turn-ins (rebacked, original spines laid down) First edition of this spectacular monograph on the heathers: a work which Blunt considered to be Andrews 'finest achievement ... noble in conception and impressive in execution'. The present set includes the rare fourth volume published sporadically between 1810 and 1830 and therefore rarely found complete The work was very much the achievment of one man: Andrews not only drew and engraved all the plates 'from living plants only', but also wrote most of the text , and according to Dunthorne, also coloured the plates himself. The 4-volume set was originally issued in parts between 1794 and 1830, a period when interest in 'ericas' was at its height, stimulated by the apparently endless stream of plants being discovered and shipped back from South Africa. Nurserymen specialized in cultivating the new arrivals and at the height of 'eroicamania' large numbers of different varieties were available: in the list bound at the back of vol.I Andrews records that 228 varieties were under cultivation by Messrs. Lee and Kennedy of Hammersmith in 1802. The first three volumes of the present set were apparently bound up shortly after the completion of the third volume in 1809, and the watermark date of '1829' on the endpapers of the final volume show that it was bound to match shortly after the completion of the work in 1830. Various peripheral leaves can be found in this work, but most sets are without one of more of these leaves - the present set includes the four 'systematical arrangement' that were missing from the Plesch copy, but does not include the dedication leaf or one-leaf introduction BM (NH) I, p.46; Dunthorne 9; Great Flower Books (1990) p. 69; Johnston Cleveland Collections 674 (vols.I-III only); Nissen BBI 31; Pritzel 174; Stafleu & Cowan 134.

$35000.00

Floral Illustrations of the Seasons, consisting of the most beautiful hardy and rare herbaceous plants, cultivated in the flower garden, from drawings by Mrs. Edward Roscoe
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Floral Illustrations of the Seasons, consisting of the most beautiful hardy and rare herbaceous plants, cultivated in the flower garden, from drawings by Mrs. Edward Roscoe

By ROSCOE, Margaret (c.1786-1840)

London: Robert Havell, 1831. Quarto. (11 1/4 x 9 1/8 inches). Engraved title and 55 hand coloured engraved and aquatint plates, by Havell after Roscoe. Plates on wove paper watermarked J. Whatman 1830. Contemporary burgundy straight grain morocco, covers elaborately blocked in gilt and blind, spine gilt with wide semi-raised bands in five compartments, lavender endpapers, gilt edges With wonderful hand coloured plates by Havell after Margaret Roscoe. Margaret Roscoe was the daughter-in-law of William Roscoe, the Liverpool botanist, banker, and patron of the arts. She contributed several plates to Roscoe's Monandrian Plants of the Order Scitamae (1824-1829) before publishing Floral Illustrations of the Seasons (1829-31), her book of detailed botanical drawings engraved by Havell. Kramer notes that the work is one of very few Victorian English botanical books where a female illustrator/author is named on the title. Roscoe's book was produced in a very small edition at the time that Robert Havell was deeply involved in the production of Audubon's Birds of America (1827-1838), and this exquisite work demonstrates his preeminence as a natural history engraver. Nissen BBI 1676; Dunthorne 236; Great Flower Books 133; Stafleu & Cowan IV:882; cf. Kramer, Women of Flowers, p. 49.

$5000.00

Figures of the Most Beautiful, Useful and Uncommon Plants Described in the Gardeners Dictionary exhibited on three hundred copper plates, accurately engraved after drawings taken from nature, with the characters of their flowers and seed vessels, drawn when they were in their greatest perfection
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Figures of the Most Beautiful, Useful and Uncommon Plants Described in the Gardeners Dictionary exhibited on three hundred copper plates, accurately engraved after drawings taken from nature, with the characters of their flowers and seed vessels, drawn when they were in their greatest perfection

By MILLER, Philip (1691-1771)

London: Printed for the Author; and sold by John Rivington [and others], 1755. 2 volumes, folio. (16 1/2 x 10 3/4 inches). Engraved allegorical headpiece to the dedication leaf after and by J. S. Miller, woodcut headpiece and initial-frame. 300 hand-coloured engraved plates (two folding) after G. D. Ehret, J. Bartram, W. Houston, R. Lancake and J. S. Miller by Miller, T. Jefferys, and J. Mynde. Uncut. Contemporary marrbled paper boards, expertly rebacked to style in tan calf, spine gult with raised bands. Housed in a slipcase. A lovely set of the first edition of Miller's illustrated supplement to his overwhelmingly popular Gardeners Dictionary. While conceived as a complement to an earlier publication, Miller's Figures of ... Plants "is a sufficiently complete work and may be rated on its own merits" (Hunt). In the preface, Miller stated his intention of publishing one figure of a plant for every known genus, but abandoned this in favor of, "...those Plants only, which are either curious in themselves, or may be useful in Trades, Medicine, &c. including the Figures of such new Plants as have not been noticed by any former Botanists." The plants illustrated were either engraved from drawings of specimens in the Chelsea Physic Garden or drawings supplied by Miller's numerous correspondents, including John Bartram, the Pennsylvania naturalist (cf. plate 272), and Dr. William Houston, who travelled widely in the Americas and West Indies and bequeathed Miller his papers, drawings, and herbarium (cf. plates 44 and 182). For the plants drawn from examples in the Garden, Miller employed Richard Lancake and two of the leading botanical artists and engravers of the period, Georg Dionysius Ehret and Johann Sebastian Miller. Like Miller's Catalogus Plantarum, many of the etched and engraved plates are delicately printed in colour (i.e. green) to give a more life-like impression after hand colouring. The work was published by subscription in 50 monthly parts, with each part containing 6 plates, between 25 March 1755 and 30 June 1760. Two later editions were published in 1771 and 1809. Complete sets of the first edition are scarce, particularly in such lovely original condition. Nissen BBI 1378; Great Flower Books p. 121; Dunthorne 209; Henrey 1097; Hunt 566; Stafleu and Cowen TL2 6059; Pritzel 6241.

$22500.00

Illustratio Systematis Sexualis Linnaei ... An Illustration of the Sexual System of Linnaeus
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Illustratio Systematis Sexualis Linnaei ... An Illustration of the Sexual System of Linnaeus

By MILLER, John (1715?-1790?)

London: published and sold by the author, 1777. One volume bound in two, folio. (20 3/4 x 14 1/4 inches). Engraved frontispiece, engraved title, 4 engraved plates of botanical details, 104 engraved plates, each in two states (uncolored and finely hand colored; 66 of the hand colored plates also before letters), all by and after Miller. Extra-illustrated with 9 additional plates, each in uncolored and colored states (one before letters). 104 plates, each in two states: hand-coloured before letters and uncoloured with letters, with 9 additional plates, each in two states as above. 1 p. list of subscribers, 2 pp. errata at back of second volume. Contemporary English red straight-grained morocco gilt in the style of Staggemeier and Welcher, covers with wide decorative borders of fillets enclosing drawer-handle roll, decorative corner-pieces, spine in eight compartments with double-raised bands decorated in gilt, green silk endpapers, gilt edges A fantastic example of the first edition, with the plates in both coloured and uncoloured states, in a glorious contemporary binding and extra-illustrated with plates not usually found. The usual requirement is for 104 plates present in two states and 4 plates in only one state. The present copy includes all 108 plates from the first edition present in two states. The work is further enhanced by the presence of the contemporary addition of the "extra-illustrations." These include the "Tea Plant" plate, also in two states, inserted with the descriptive text leaf in the correct position in Linnæan class XIII in volume I; the 7 "Icones Novæ" plates (dated 1780 in the imprint) in two states; and at the end of the second volume, an unrecorded plate of a climbing lily (Gloriosa Superba), also in two states (the uncolored state on wove paper watermarked "1794," the handcolored state before letters). The work was issued in 20 parts between 1770 and 1777. According to the list of subscribers, 105 copies were ordered by 85 individuals. The uncolored plates invariably included lettering for scientific purposes, while the handcolored plates are often without lettering and the vast majority are printed using a warm brown ink with the intent of making the images more aesthetically pleasing. The plants described and illustrated came in the main from Dr. John Fothergill's famous garden in Upton, Essex. Fothergill was an enthusiastic supporter and indeed superintendent of the work, but refused Miller's attempt to dedicate the work to him. He felt that dedications were "more productive of envy to the patron, than of advantage to the author." John Miller (1715-1780), born Johann Sebastian Müller in Nuremberg, came to England in 1744 and remained there for the rest of his life. He was a botanical artist and engraver of considerable repute and came to the attention of the great naturalist Linnæus through the connection of John Ellis. Linnæus had nothing but praise for the artist, stating that the plates were "more beautiful and more accurate" than any he had ever seen. Referring to the work, Lettsom in his 1789 Memoirs of John Fothergill writes: an "immense work of botany wherein the pencil of Miller illustrated, in a style of unprecedented elegance, the sexual system of Linnæus." Dunthorne 207; Great Flower Books (1990) p.120; Henrey III, 1153; Nissen BBI 1372; Sprague 'John Sebastian Miller's Icones Novae' in Journal of Botany , vol. 74 (London: 1936), pp.208-209; cf. J. C. Lettsom, The Memoirs of John Fothergill [1789], p. 106.

$45000.00

A Dissertation upon Tea: : explaining its nature and virtues, by many new experiments; and demonstrating the various effects it has on different constitutions. To which is added, the natural history of tea; ... Also a discourse on the virtues of sage and water; and an enquiry into the reasons, why the same food is not equally agreeable to all constitutions ... The Second Edition
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A Dissertation upon Tea: : explaining its nature and virtues, by many new experiments; and demonstrating the various effects it has on different constitutions. To which is added, the natural history of tea; ... Also a discourse on the virtues of sage and water; and an enquiry into the reasons, why the same food is not equally agreeable to all constitutions ... The Second Edition

By SHORT, Thomas (1690-1772)

London: Printed for Dan. Browne [and others], 1753. Small 4to. [4],199,[1]pp. Expertly bound to style in half period russia and marbled paper covered boards, spine with raised bands, red morocco lettering piece Rare early English work on the medicinal uses of tea. Thomas Short (d. 1772) was a physician at Sheffield who specialized in the curative effects of spa waters. First published in 1730, the work covers the history of tea, including its importance in Japan and China and its first appearance in England. Short discusses the curative uses of tea in preventing such ailments as the spitting of blood, scurvy, dropsy, and indigestion. He advises its use as an antidote against the effects of chronic fear or grief and stresses that "[t]ea, if moderately drunk, and of a due strength, is generally more serviceable to the fair sex than to men" (p. 61). Short also points out the ill effects of tea, which include tremors and should on no account be used for obstructions of the liver, spleen, or pancreas. Included is "An Appendix Containing a Dissertation on Sage and Water" in which Short describes the various types of sage and its medicinal properties. The present scarce second edition not to be confused with Short's more common Discourses on Tea, Sugar, Milk, Made Wines, Spirits, Punch, Tobacco, etc , published the same year. ESTC N2348.

$2500.00

A New Illustration of the Sexual System of Linnaeus by ... Thornton [The Genera of Exotic and Indigenous Plants that are to be met with in Great Britain; arranged according to the reformed system, by ... Thornton]
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A New Illustration of the Sexual System of Linnaeus by ... Thornton [The Genera of Exotic and Indigenous Plants that are to be met with in Great Britain; arranged according to the reformed system, by ... Thornton]

By THORNTON, Robert John (circa 1768-1837)

London: published by Dr. Thornton, 1801. 2 parts in one volume, folio. (18 5/8 x 12 7/8 inches). Engraved title to each part, engraved allegorical frontispiece titled Cupid, Flora, Ceres and Esculapius Honouring the Bust of Linnaeus, engraved portrait frontispiece of Queen Charlotte, engraved allegorical plate titled Cupid Inspiring Plants with Love, 16 engraved portraits of botanists on 14 sheets, 43 engraved plates on 42 leaves (including 34 botanical illustrations and 9 engraved pages of text or tables), all uncoloured. (Some spotting and browning, numerous blindstamps, 2 botanical plates shaved into the image area). Later half calf over textured cloth-covered boards (upper joint split) Provenance: Chetham Library, Manchester, England (blindstamps) An extraordinary offshoot of Thornton's larger work of the same name With this work, an offshoot of his larger masterpiece of the same title, Thornton attempted to explain Linnaean botany, as well as expound upon his own botanical theories. The work celebrates great contemporary and historical botanists and their supporters and also includes plates of many cross-sections of plant stems. The logic of the work is elusive, but what is undeniable is that, like its larger cousin, the present work includes some very charming plates, particularly the allegorical ones and the intriguing image of the dragon arum. The chaotic publication of Thornton's masterpiece, the seeminglly haphazard order in which plates, text, tables were published, and the work's final ignominious fate as prizes in a lottery draw have all meant that there is no definitive bibliographical description for either the large-scale work or the present somewhat smaller offshoot.

$1000.00

Chlora perfoliata
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Chlora perfoliata

By ETTINGSHAUSEN, Constantin Freiherr Von (1826-1897), and POKORNY, Alois (1826-1886)

Vienna: Hof- und Staatsdruckerei, 1856. 'Nature printed' in brown ink, with titling and imprint in black, by the Vienna Hof- und Staatsdruckerei. A beautiful example from "most important work produced by nature printing ever published" (Stafleu). To the modern eye this plate has an almost photographic beauty to it, which, in aesthetic terms, foreshadows the work of the great early-20th century photographers such as Man Ray. However, this achievement is almost certainly incidental as von Ettingshausen's intention was to present a detailed anatomical portrait using the highly exacting method of nature printing. John Lindley writes "Attempts were long since made to obtain Botanical portraits by printing from the plants themselves, flattened and otherwise prepared for the purpose... The process of the Imperial Printing Office [Hof- und Staatsdruckerei] at Vienna, to which the name of Nature-Printing has been happily applied.. is a great improvement upon the old method, inasmuch as it represents not only general form with absolute accuracy, but also surface, hairs, veins, and other minutiae of superficial structure by which plants are known irrespective of the hidden details of their hidden organization. Moreover, an exact copy in copper of the part to be represented being employed by the printer, instead of so fragile an object as the plant itself, we obtain the means of multiplying copies to the same extent as in copperplate engraving; and hence the method becomes suitable for purposes of publication." (Preface of 'The Ferns of Great Britain and Ireland... Edited by John Lindley... Nature-printed by Henry Bradbury') . The present plate was printed under the supervision of Alois Auer, the inventor of the nature printing process, at the Vienna state press. Von Ettingshausen, an Austrian botanist, palaeontologist and mineralogist, was a keen supporter of nature printing and published a number of other works using the process (the Bradley Bibliography lists 24 titles under his name). Pokorny worked with von Ettingshausen to improve the quality of nature printing and worked as a teacher and lecturer at various establishments in Vienna, lecturing on phytogeography at the university from 1857-1868. Cf. Fischer 69; cf. Hunt Printmaking in the Service of Botany (1986) 60; cf. Nissen BBI 613; cf. Pritzel 2756; cf. Stafleu & Cowan TL2 1723.

$225.00

Cerastium  brachypetalum
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Cerastium brachypetalum

By ETTINGSHAUSEN, Constantin Freiherr Von (1826-1897), and POKORNY, Alois (1826-1886)

Vienna: Hof- und Staatsdruckerei, 1856. 'Nature printed' in brown ink, with titling and imprint in black, by the Vienna Hof- und Staatsdruckerei. A beautiful example from "most important work produced by nature printing ever published" (Stafleu). To the modern eye this plate has an almost photographic beauty to it, which, in aesthetic terms, foreshadows the work of the great early-20th century photographers such as Man Ray. However, this achievement is almost certainly incidental as von Ettingshausen's intention was to present a detailed anatomical portrait using the highly exacting method of nature printing. John Lindley writes "Attempts were long since made to obtain Botanical portraits by printing from the plants themselves, flattened and otherwise prepared for the purpose... The process of the Imperial Printing Office [Hof- und Staatsdruckerei] at Vienna, to which the name of Nature-Printing has been happily applied.. is a great improvement upon the old method, inasmuch as it represents not only general form with absolute accuracy, but also surface, hairs, veins, and other minutiae of superficial structure by which plants are known irrespective of the hidden details of their hidden organization. Moreover, an exact copy in copper of the part to be represented being employed by the printer, instead of so fragile an object as the plant itself, we obtain the means of multiplying copies to the same extent as in copperplate engraving; and hence the method becomes suitable for purposes of publication." (Preface of 'The Ferns of Great Britain and Ireland... Edited by John Lindley... Nature-printed by Henry Bradbury') . The present plate was printed under the supervision of Alois Auer, the inventor of the nature printing process, at the Vienna state press. Von Ettingshausen, an Austrian botanist, palaeontologist and mineralogist, was a keen supporter of nature printing and published a number of other works using the process (the Bradley Bibliography lists 24 titles under his name). Pokorny worked with von Ettingshausen to improve the quality of nature printing and worked as a teacher and lecturer at various establishments in Vienna, lecturing on phytogeography at the university from 1857-1868. Cf. Fischer 69; cf. Hunt Printmaking in the Service of Botany (1986) 60; cf. Nissen BBI 613; cf. Pritzel 2756; cf. Stafleu & Cowan TL2 1723.

$225.00

Anemone nemorosa; A. ranunculoides
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Anemone nemorosa; A. ranunculoides

By ETTINGSHAUSEN, Constantin Freiherr Von (1826-1897), and POKORNY, Alois (1826-1886)

Vienna: Hof- und Staatsdruckerei, 1856. 'Nature printed' in brown ink, with titling and imprint in black, by the Vienna Hof- und Staatsdruckerei. A beautiful example from "most important work produced by nature printing ever published" (Stafleu). To the modern eye this plate has an almost photographic beauty to it, which, in aesthetic terms, foreshadows the work of the great early-20th century photographers such as Man Ray. However, this achievement is almost certainly incidental as von Ettingshausen's intention was to present a detailed anatomical portrait using the highly exacting method of nature printing. John Lindley writes "Attempts were long since made to obtain Botanical portraits by printing from the plants themselves, flattened and otherwise prepared for the purpose... The process of the Imperial Printing Office [Hof- und Staatsdruckerei] at Vienna, to which the name of Nature-Printing has been happily applied.. is a great improvement upon the old method, inasmuch as it represents not only general form with absolute accuracy, but also surface, hairs, veins, and other minutiae of superficial structure by which plants are known irrespective of the hidden details of their hidden organization. Moreover, an exact copy in copper of the part to be represented being employed by the printer, instead of so fragile an object as the plant itself, we obtain the means of multiplying copies to the same extent as in copperplate engraving; and hence the method becomes suitable for purposes of publication." (Preface of 'The Ferns of Great Britain and Ireland... Edited by John Lindley... Nature-printed by Henry Bradbury') . The present plate was printed under the supervision of Alois Auer, the inventor of the nature printing process, at the Vienna state press. Von Ettingshausen, an Austrian botanist, palaeontologist and mineralogist, was a keen supporter of nature printing and published a number of other works using the process (the Bradley Bibliography lists 24 titles under his name). Pokorny worked with von Ettingshausen to improve the quality of nature printing and worked as a teacher and lecturer at various establishments in Vienna, lecturing on phytogeography at the university from 1857-1868. Cf. Fischer 69; cf. Hunt Printmaking in the Service of Botany (1986) 60; cf. Nissen BBI 613; cf. Pritzel 2756; cf. Stafleu & Cowan TL2 1723.

$225.00

[Apple] Pheonix Apple; Norman's Beauty
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[Apple] Pheonix Apple; Norman's Beauty

By BROOKSHAW, After George (1751-1823)

[London]: G. Brookshaw, 1812. Aquatint engraving, with some stipple, printed in colours and finished by hand. In excellent condition. A fine image from Brookshaw's masterpiece "Pomona Britannica; or, A Collection of the Most Esteemed Fruits," the finest work on fruit and flowers ever produced. Its breathtaking images display a level of technical virtuosity and beauty that distinguish this magnificent aquatint as a true work of art. Brookshaw produced this seminal botanical study late in his career, at first publishing it in parts and then as a complete edition in 1812. The fact that this outstanding work took ten years to complete is evident in the quality of its images and the care with which Brookshaw executed each individual picture. 'Pomona Britannica' was produced as a visual record of the best available varieties of fruit in an attempt to encourage gardeners to experiment with growing fruit, and illustrates examples found in the Royal gardens at Hampton Court, Kensington Gardens, and the private gardens of the Prince of Wales in Blackheath. 'Pomona Britannica' differs from other botanical works in its dark aquatinted backgrounds and its stylized compositions. By using aquatint to create a contrasting background, Brookshaw manages to produce a truly dramatic effect. His use of stylized composition distinguishes his pictures from the dry scientific illustrations found in other botanical studies and creates an exceptionally beautiful visual experience. 'Pomona Britannica' is not only a didactic study, it is a masterpiece of illustration in which every picture is a testament to the artist's talent and ingenuity. Cf. Dunthorne 50; cf. Great Flower Books (1990) p. 81; cf. Nissen BBI 244; cf. Sandra Raphael An Oak Spring Pomona 40a.

$4000.00

The Retir'd Gard'ner
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The Retir'd Gard'ner

By LONDON, George (c.1640-1714); and Henry WISE (1653-1738)

London: Printed for Jacob Tonson, 1706. 2 volumes, 8vo. (7 1/4 x 4 1/4 inches). [2], [18], 383pp; [10], 385-788, [12]pp. Vol. 1 Engraved frontispiece and 12 engraved plates (one folding), illustrations within the text. Vol. 2: Engraved frontispiece [repeated from the first volume], 10 engraved plates (one folding), illustrations within the text. Old repairs to folding plate in vol. 2. Contemporary panelled calf, expertly rebacked to style, spine gilt with raised bands in six compartments, red morocco lettering piece Provenance: John Tomas (contemporary signature on title); William Leigh Oswestry (early signature); Oscar Ehrhardt, Lancaster (armorial bookplate); Charles Irish (later signature on title) First edition of an important English botanical work. London and Wise "built up Brompton Park to be the foremost nursery garden in the country. Furthermore, they became the leading garden designers of the period ... Chatsworth, Castle Howard, and Melbourne are but three of the famous gardens with which these men's names are associated" (Henrey, I:p. 181). The present work "is an English version of two French works: Le Jardinier Solitaire by Francois Gentil and Le Jardinier Fleuriste et Historiographe by Louis Liger ... London and Wise perused the translation and made such observations, alterations, and amendments as they thought necessary 'to render it proper for our English culture.'" (Henrey, II,p. 321). Henrey III:989.

$3200.00

The Fruits and Fruit Trees of America; or, The Culture, Propagation, and Management, in the Garden and Orchard, of Fruit Trees generally...
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The Fruits and Fruit Trees of America; or, The Culture, Propagation, and Management, in the Garden and Orchard, of Fruit Trees generally...

By DOWNING, ANDREW JACKSON

New York: Wiley & Putnam, 1847. xiv,594pp. plus sixty-seven colored lithograph plates. Modern black morocco, spine gilt. Light scattered foxing, but plates generally clean, with tissue guards. With Beautiful Color Plates of American Fruits The first edition to contain colored plates of "the standard American pomological authority" (Hedrick). A.J. Downing and his brother, Charles, revolutionized both American landscape gardening and American fruit growing in the 1840s, the latter with the publication of this book in 1845. This 1847 edition employs the same plates, but it is printed on larger paper and adds the handsome color plates which only appear in this edition and one issued in 1850. After A.J. Downing's death, the book went through some twenty editions in the 19th century under Charles' editorship. The text makes no reference to the lovely plates of apples, pears, cherries, plums, berries, and other fruits, and as Plesch says, they "seem to have crept into the volume by stealth." The Plesch copy and the one recorded by Bennett each contain only sixty-nine plates; however, we have handled copies with varying numbers of plates, and this copy has sixty-seven. The plates were actually produced in Paris and shipped to America to be bound with the book. The final product is a lovely and important volume. Bennett, p.35; Hedrick, p.486; Meisel III, p.441; Oak Spring Pomona 60; Plesch Sale 219.

$12000.00

Catalogues of the birds, shells, and some of the more rare plants, of Dorsetshire. From the new and enlarged edition of Mr. Hutchins's history of that county ... With additions; and a brief memoir of the author
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Catalogues of the birds, shells, and some of the more rare plants, of Dorsetshire. From the new and enlarged edition of Mr. Hutchins's history of that county ... With additions; and a brief memoir of the author

By PULTENEY, Richard (1730-1801); and Thomas RACKETT (1757-1841)

[London: Printed by and for J. Nichols, Son, and Bentley, 1813. Folio. (19 1/2 x 12 inches). Text in two columns. iv, 110pp. Engraved portrait, 24 engraved plates on 13 sheets. Uncut. Some foxing. Later cloth-backed grey paper boards. Large-paper issue of the first illustrated edition of a rare catalogue of British birds, plants and shells. Richard Pulteney received his doctorate in medicine from the University of Edinburgh in 1764, before serving as the personal physician to the Earl of Bath. Following the Earl's death, he resided and practiced in Blandford, Dorset. Besides membership in a host of medical societies, Pulteney was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society, as well as a Fellow of the Linnean Society. Indeed, he was an early promoter of Linnaean taxonomy, and authored the first English biography of Linnaeus in 1781. His cabinet of specimens, noted particularly for its shells, was donated to the Linnean Society following his death in 1801. The first edition of 1799 was privately-published by Pulteney with few copies printed. An inscription in an extant copy by the editor of this new edition reveals that copies of the first edition were further destroyed by fire: "The first Impression of Dr. Pulteney's Catalogues was printed in 1801 [i.e. 1799], but never published, the whole having been destroyed by the fire, at Mr. Nichols's printing office [in 1808]. I have been enabled to make considerable additions in this second impression, from communication by various scientific friends, and from my own obervations." Rackett's revised edition was the first to be illustrated, containing a portrait of Pulteney, a plate depicting 17 shells titled Melbury Fossils (engraved by J. Cary after Mary Foster), and 23 engraved plates of shells on 12 sheets. The plates numbered I-XXIII are new engravings of those by De Costa in his Historia Naturalis Testaeorum Britanniae, with several additions, depicting over 200 species. The present copy is a very rare large-paper issue, printed on wove paper (the 1799 and regular issue of 1813 being on laid paper), with a variant title without imprint. This large-paper issue is not recorded by the usual bibliographies. BM(NH) IV:p. 1622; Pritzel 7367; Nissen, ZBI 3250.

$3500.00

[A tree-peddler's sample book containing a large collection of colour fruit and botanical specimen plates]
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[A tree-peddler's sample book containing a large collection of colour fruit and botanical specimen plates]

By MENSING & STECHER LITHOGRAPHIC COMPANY

[Rochester, N.Y.], 1885. Oblong 8vo. 82 pochoir and chromolithographic plates, many with the Mensing & Stecher imprint, but also including Dewey, Horticultural Art Journal, and other imprints. Many plates with pencil annotations of prices. Contemporary black morocco, rebacked A Mensing & Stecher "tree-peddler's" sample book with fine color plates of fruit varieties. German-born Frank A. Stecher (1849-1916) first set up in business in Rochester in 1871 with Charles F. Muntz and Anton Rahn. They specialized in chromolithographic fruit plates, the first to do so in Rochester. In 1874-5 Muntz left the firm and J.D.A. Mensing became a partner. Three years later Rahn left. "Late in 1886, Stecher bought out Mensing and the firm became Stecher Lithographic Company... Stecher... was a leader in the chromolithographic industry in Rochester.... An 1888 guide to the industries of Rochester noted that the firm employed 100 people and had machinery valued at $125,000" (K.S. Kabelac `Nineteenth-Century Rochester Fruit and Flower Plates' in The University of Rochester Library Bulletin (1982), vol.XXXV, p. 103). The Mensing & Stecher imprint is on many of the plates, which include both pochoir and chromolithographic examples. Cf. Karl Sanford Kabelac `Nineteenth-Century Rochester Fruit and Flower Plates' in The University of Rochester Library Bulletin (1982) vol. XXXV, pp. 93-114; cf. Sandra Raphael An Oak Spring Pomona 65.

$1800.00

The Magazine of Natural History, and Journal of Zoology, Botany, Mineralogy, Geology, and Meteorology ... [New Series, Vols. 1-4]
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The Magazine of Natural History, and Journal of Zoology, Botany, Mineralogy, Geology, and Meteorology ... [New Series, Vols. 1-4]

By CHARLESWORTH, Edward (1813-1893), editor

London: Longman, Orme, Brown, Green, and Longmans, 1840. 4 volumes, 8vo. 19 engraved plates (one double-page). Publisher's green cloth, covers stamped in blind A complete run of Charlesworth's continuation of Loudon's Magazine of Natural History. Volume 4 includes an essay (with an engraved plate) by Waterhouse concerning two Carabideous insects collected by Charles Darwin in South America during the Beagle voyage. Also of Darwin interest is a review of the Zoology of the Beagle in vol. 3. This complete run of the new series includes submissions by many of the most notable natural historians of the day and include a number of submissions concerning the flora and fauna of Australia.

$1500.00

Antediluvian Phytology, Illustrated by a Collection of the Fossil Remains of Plants, peculiar to the coal formations of Great Britain
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Antediluvian Phytology, Illustrated by a Collection of the Fossil Remains of Plants, peculiar to the coal formations of Great Britain

By ARTIS, Edmund Tyrell (1789-1847)

London: Nichols & Son, 1838. Quarto. 25 engraved plates (one double-page, numbered 1-24, plus 3 bis), by Weddell after Curtis. Publisher's green cloth, covers stamped in blind Provenance: Timothy Bigelow (bookplate) Scarce work, with among the best palaeobotanical illustrations to have been published up to that time. The title continues: "Selected for their novelty and interest, from upwards of a thousand specimens now in the possession of the author, and systematically described, with the view of facilitating the study of this important branch of geology." First published in 1825, the present 1838 issue is comprised of the same text and plates with a cancelled title. Serving as the House Steward to the Earl Fitzwilliam, between 1816 and 1821 Artis collected plant fossils on the Fitzwilliam properties in South Yorkshire. Many of the fossils were collected by Artis himself in underground mines and the result was a personal collection of between 1000 and 1500 plant fossils, many of exceptional quality. In 1825, Artis published the present book, which included among the best palaeobotanical illustrations to have been published up to that time. Some of the illustrations were based on paintings by Artis himself (among his many skills, he was an accomplished artist and sculptor) but most were by the leading natural history illustrator John Curtis. Each plate was accompanied by a clear description, comparison and analysis of the fossils. Nissen BBI 51; Stafleu & Cowan I:191.

$950.00

Her Garden. A Poem by Susan Coolidge Illustrated with Hand-Painted Flower Designs from Originals by Alice Stewart Hill
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Her Garden. A Poem by Susan Coolidge Illustrated with Hand-Painted Flower Designs from Originals by Alice Stewart Hill

By COOLIDGE, Susan [i.e. Sarah Chauncey WOOLSLEY] (1835-1905); and Alice Stewart HILL (1850-1921)

Troy NY: Nims & Knight, 1890. 4to. Title printed in sepia and red, the text in sepia throughout. The text of the poem on six sheets, each with elaborately hand colored floral borders over thin etched line. Publisher's wrappers, upper cover with embossed lettering and hand painted floral design, ribbon stitching renewed. A very rare illustrated work by two remarkable Colorado women. The seven stanza poem by Coolidge, the pen name of Sarah Chauncey Woolsley, was written in memory of Helen Hunt Jackson and describes the wild flowers on Cheyenne Mountain, Colorado. The text is embellished with floral borders by the illustrator Alice Stewart Hill, best known for her The Procession of Flowers in Colorado. Hill's drawings were etched by Thomas Parrish and Hill, printed in New York and published and bound in Colorado Springs in 1888. This Troy New York second edition is evidently printed from the same plates. Both editions are extremely scarce, with only two examples extant.

$750.00

The British Flora; comprising the Phaenogamous or Flowering Plants and the Ferns ... [Bound with:] Characters of Genera, Extracted from the British Flora
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The British Flora; comprising the Phaenogamous or Flowering Plants and the Ferns ... [Bound with:] Characters of Genera, Extracted from the British Flora

By HOOKER, Sir Joseph Dalton (1817-1911)

London: Longman, Rees, Orme, Brown & Green, 1830. 2 volumes in one, 8vo. (8 x 4 3/4 inches). iii-x, 480; 64pp. [Bound with:] An 8pp. contemporary manuscript being extracts from Hooker's Muscologia Britannica. Contemporary smooth tan calf, a bit scuffed. First edition of Hooker's British Flora, bound with a scarce separately-printed related work. First published here in 1830, Hooker's British Flora would go through eight editions by 1860. "The object which the Author proposed to himself, in preparing a new Flora of the British Empire, was a twofold nature" 1stly, to provide the young Student with a description of our native plants, arranged according to the simplest method; and 2dly, to afford to the more experienced Botanist, a manual, that should be useful in the field as well as in the closet" (Introduction). The second work bound in is particularly uncommon, with only one other example cited in OCLC. The manuscript, possibly in Hooker's hand, extracts descriptions relating to the genera Hepaticae from Hooker's Muscologia Britannica, and would seem to be related to his 1844 continuation of British Flora concerning cryptogamia. Stafleu & Cowan TL-2 3000.

$800.00

Histoire des Chênes de l'Amérique, ou descriptions et figures de toutes les espèces et variétés de Chênes de I'Amérique Septentrionale, considérées sous les rapports de la Botanique, de leur culture et de leur usage
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Histoire des Chênes de l'Amérique, ou descriptions et figures de toutes les espèces et variétés de Chênes de I'Amérique Septentrionale, considérées sous les rapports de la Botanique, de leur culture et de leur usage

By MICHAUX, André (1746-1802)

Paris: de l'Imprimerie Crapelet, 1801. Folio. (17 1/2 x 11 1/2 inches). Half-title. 36 copper-engraved plates after Pierre-Joseph Redouté (32) or Henri-Joseph Redouté (4), by Plée (33) or Sellier (3). Minor foxing. Twentieth century half green morocco and green cloth boards, spine with raised bands in six compartments, panelled and lettered in gilt, marbled endpapers and edges The first edition Michaux's magisterial monograph on all the known species of North American Oaks, illustrated by the best known botanical painter of all time. In this excellent and very beautiful monograph Michaux begins by giving an historical overview of the Oak, before giving detailed descriptions of all the American species he had encountered. Starting with the Latin binomial, he gives a brief description in botanical Latin, Latin synonyms and the name in French and English. This is followed by notes on the trees height when full-grown, and descriptions of the timber, leaves, flowers and its geographical distribution. The remainder of each entry is made up of Michaux's observations which concentrate on whether the tree is worth cultivating, and if so for what reason. Thirty-two of the plates in this work are particularly striking early examples of the work of Pierre-Joseph Redouté, the remaining four are after his brother Henri-Joseph. The classically understated line engraved plates allow the unerring sense of design of the master botanical painter to be fully appreciated. All of the main species are illustrated by one plate, and a number by two. These second plates include acutely observed studies of young plants or details of leaves. "André Michaux was sent to America in 1785 by the French government, which asked him to collect timber trees and plants useful as either food or medicine. Michaux... was accompanied by his young son, François André, and a gardener, Paul Saulnier. A nursery garden was established in New Jersey, not far from New York, where Saulnier was to be in charge of a base for collections waiting to be sent back to Europe. During the next ten years, thousands of trees were collected by Michaux [on his travels to the southern Appalachians, Spanish Florida, the Bahamas, and the Carolina mountains. These were taken to the royal nurseries at Rambouillet... [but] relatively few of the plants survived... A second Michaux nursery was established at Charleston, South Carolina, under the care of François André until 1790, when he went back to France [to study medicine]. Meanwhile his father traveled from Hudson's Bay to Florida and west to the Mississippi in his search for new plants... The elder Michaux returned to France in 1796" ( Oak Spring Sylva ). Here he tried unsuccessfully to raise money from the government for further exploration of North America, and eventually accepted a post on Baudin's expedition to Australia, leaving France in October 1800. This was the last time that François André was to see his father (he died in Madagascar in 1802), and the younger Michaux was left to see the present work through the presses. However, he was more successful in getting official backing and visited America twice more: firstly from 1801 to 1803 and finally from 1806 to 1809. This copy MacPhail's "b" issue, with the preferred complete form of the text (the prior issue including only four pages of text with brief descriptions compared to the present 49-pages of full descriptions). Great Flower Books (1990) p.119; MacPhail Redouteana 8; MacPhail Sterling Morton Library Bibliographies... André & François-André Michaux 1b; Madol 20; Meisel III, 362; Nissen BBI 1358; Oak Spring Silva 18; Pritzel 6194; Stafleu & Cowan TL2 5957.

$9500.00

Descriptions and sketches of some remarkable oaks, in the park at Welbeck, in the county of Nottingham, a seat of His Grace the Duke of Portland. To which are Added, Observations on the Age and Durability of that tree. With Remarks on the Annual Growth of the Acorn
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Descriptions and sketches of some remarkable oaks, in the park at Welbeck, in the county of Nottingham, a seat of His Grace the Duke of Portland. To which are Added, Observations on the Age and Durability of that tree. With Remarks on the Annual Growth of the Acorn

By ROOKE, Hayman (1723-1806)

London: J. Nichols, for the Author, 1790. Small quarto. 23, [1]pp, plus 10 engraved plates. Expertly bound to style in period tree calf, flat spine gilt Scarce work on the oak trees of North Nottinghamshire. As a retired Royal Artillery officer, Rooke dedicated his time to the study of local archaeology and natural history, with a particular fondness for the trees of his native Nottinghamshire. The Major Oak is named in his honor. ESTC T68761.

$1750.00

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