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Specimens of Oriental Tinting [cover title: being an album of original botanical watercolour drawings]

By BOTANICAL WATERCOLOURS - F.M. STANTON (artist)

[Great Britain, 1828. Folio. (15 2/5 x 12 inches). 20 drawings (each approx. 15 3/8 x 12 inches) in watercolour and bodycolour on paper, all but one with caption in gold ink, 16 signed or initialled by Stanton, 1p. small format manuscript list of the flowers (including 4 not present in the album) tipped to front endpaper. Contemporary English green half calf with red textured paper on covers, the upper cover with large centrally-placed green calf title label, lettered 'Specimens / of / Oriental Tinting.' within a decorative border of double fillets and a stylized scrolling vine roll-tool, expertly rebacked and cornered to style, the flat spine divided into six compartments by fillets and roll tools, simple repeat pattern to each compartment of a single centrally-placed lozenge-shaped tool. Modern green cloth box, morocco lettering piece. A unique album of original botanical watercolours, the majority being exotic species, and all executed using the theorem painting technique of oriental tinting. This album contains very early examples of original artwork produced using a technique that came to prominence in the late 1820s and early-1830s. The results, here painted on 'Imperial London Board', show a strong sense of both design and colour whilst still retaining the charming naivété of what was essentially a folk art technique. Oriental tinting was an early version of theorem painting technique that enjoyed such widespread popularity in both Europe and the United States during the 19th century. The exact date of the invention or introduction of this method is uncertain, but in 1829 Nathaniel Whittock, in his work The art of drawing and colouring from nature , writes of 'the new method of oriental tinting'. By the following year the method was popular enough for W. Morgan, a drawing master in Torquay, to publish a work titled The Art of Oriental Tinting. Morgan describes the technique as a 'method of applying watercolour which gives [the drawings] a softness and brilliancy almost surpassing nature in the effect produced.' The method involved transferring a drawing with 'oriental' (or tracing) paper to paper, wood, velvet, silk, satin or marble, and working up the colours to the desired brilliancy. The patterns from which the present watercolours are taken appear to include various sources, the majority printed. The origin of one drawing can be precisely identified: the 13th image, titled 'Passiflora Racemoso. Princess Charlotte's Passion Flower', is an adapted version of plate number 2001 from the volume of William Curtis's The Botanical Magazine published in 1818. This helps with the dating of the album, as do the watermarks on the mounts (dated 1827-1828) and the watermark on the manuscript list of plates (1828). All the drawings are evidently by the same hand, and the probability is that the artist, F.M. Stanton, was a woman. In any case, the creator of the present album shows a particular penchant for exotic flowers, and the species pictured include amaryllis Formosissima, passiflora racemosa, coccinea dahlia, convolvolus Jalapa, camellia Japonica, bigonia aquinoctialis and the splendid magnolia purpurea.

$12000.00

L'Antotrofia ossia la Coltivazione de'Fiori

By PICCIOLI, Antonio (1794-1842)

Florence: V. Betelli e Figli, 1834. 2 volumes, 8vo. 72 hand coloured plates. Contemporary calf-backed cloth covered boards, flat spines elaborately tooled in gilt and blind, lettered in gilt First edition of a lovely 19th century Italian flower book. Piccioli succeeded his father as the gardener to the Museum of Natural History in Florence. "L'Antotrofia' reveals Piccioli to be both a scientist and a man of letters. The work opens with an Italian translation of an idyll written by the Swiss poet Salomon Gessner (1730-88) and dedicated to the Greek myth of Lica, the first gardener. To his detailed descriptions of cultivation and propagation techniques, plant diseases and insect pests, Picciolo adds verses by classical and contemporary poets, ranging from Sappho and Metastasio to Lamartine and Gessner. Piccioli's 'L'Antotrofia' provides an interesting example of symbolism of flowers in an Italian vein..." (Oak Spring Flora). Stafleu 7884; Plesch p361; Nissen 1527n; Great Flower Books, p. 70; Tomasi, Oak Spring Flora, p. 369.

$1850.00

Maison Rustique, Or, The Countrey Farme ... Now newly Reviewed, Corrected and Augmented, with divers large Additions
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Maison Rustique, Or, The Countrey Farme ... Now newly Reviewed, Corrected and Augmented, with divers large Additions

By ESTIENNE, Charles (1504-1564) and Jean LIEBAULT (d. 1595); Gervase MARKHAM (1568-1637), editor

London: Printed by Adam Islip for John Bull, 1616. Small folio, bound in sixes. (10 5/8 x 6 3/4 inches). Woodcut illustrations in text, ornamental headpieces and woodcut initials. [18], 732, [22] pp. Page 253 misnumbered, as issued. Early marginal annotations throughout. Contemporary calf, covers bordered in blind and with a central gilt device, expertly rebacked, spine with raised bands in six compartments, lettered in the second, the others with a repeat decoration in gilt First edition of Markham's revised English translation of Charles Estienne and Jean Liebault's important late 16th century work on husbandry, gardening and country living. In this work, Markham, the most prolific English writer on agriculture and farming in the first half of the 17th century, adapts an earlier work by Charles Estienne (aka Charles Stevens, in English). "It was first published in Latin as the Praedium Rusticum in 1554. Charles Estienne himself translated it into French and Liebault brought it out shortly after Estienne's death in 1564. Surflet's first English translation appeared in 1600" (Hunt). This first Markham editiion, based on the Surflet translation, is noted for its additions, as well as its rarity. Fussell refers to this adaptation of Estienne's work as among Markham's most important works on general farming. The text on verso of the title, under the caption The Contents, gives an accurate description of the work: "There is contained in this last Edition, whatsoever can be required for the building, or good ordering, of a Husbandrymans House, or Countrey Farme; as namely, to foresee the changes and alterations of Times; to know the motions and powers of the Sunne and Moone, upon the things about which Husbandry is occupied: as to cure the sicke labouring Man; to cure Beasts and flying Fowles of all sorts; to dresse, plant or make Gardens, as well as for the Kitchen, and Physicke use, as also in Quarters..." The description continues touching on a variety of subjects, including the planting and care of trees, the keeping of bees, the making of wine and beer, on distillation, as well as on hunting and hawking. The illustrations include several full-page woodcut plans for knot gardens (pp. 257-275), a garden labyrinth (p. 276), a tobacco plant (p. 217), plus large woodcuts of a cow (p. 99) and horse (p. 138) with references to various ailments, among others. A complete copy of a scarce book, often found defective. McDonald, p. 90; Bitting, pp 146-47; Fussell, p. 28; Goldsmiths 451; Hunt 202; Kress 353; Arents 123; Poynter 31.1; STC 10549; ESTC S121357.

$5800.00

The Fruits and Fruit-Trees of America ... Second Revision and Correction with large Additions
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The Fruits and Fruit-Trees of America ... Second Revision and Correction with large Additions

By DOWNING, Andrew Jackson (1815-1852) and Charles (1802-1885)

New York: John Wiley, 1872. 2 volumes, 8vo. xx, 464, [2], 42; vii, [2], 433-1071, [1], [2], 19, [1]pp. Illustrations. Contemporary half green morocco and marbled paper covered boards, spine gilt with raised bands in six compartments, marbled endpapers Expanded edition of "the standard American pomological authority" (Hedrick). A.J. Downing and his brother, Charles, revolutionized both American landscape gardening and American fruit growing in the 1840s, the latter with the first publication of this book in 1845. After A.J. Downing's death, the book went through some twenty editions in the 19th century under Charles' editorship. The first volume of this much expanded edition is devoted to apples; the second to cherries, grapes, peaches and pears. Hedrick, p.486; Oak Spring Pomona 60.

$750.00

Le Jardin Fruitier, contenant l'histoire, la description, la culture et les usages des arbres fruitiers, des fraisiers, et des meilleures espèces de vignes qui se trouvent en Europ
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Le Jardin Fruitier, contenant l'histoire, la description, la culture et les usages des arbres fruitiers, des fraisiers, et des meilleures espèces de vignes qui se trouvent en Europ

By NOISETTE, Louis-Claude (1772-1849)

Paris: Audot, 1821. 2 volumes, 4to. (11 3/8 x 8 3/8 inches). [4], 176; [2], 95, [1]pp., including the vol. 2 title which is here bound in with the plates. 90 hand colored engraved plates (numbered 1-77, plus 9, 10 and 52 bis, and I-X [one folding]). With a contemporary 2pp. letterpress handbill by a Valence, France horticulturalist, listing various species of fruits with their dates of maturity, laid in. Contemporary tree calf, covers bordered in gilt, flat spines decoratively tooled in gilt, red morocco labels. Provenance: Mr. De Chazotte (lettered in gilt on the spine, signature on the half title and printed label on the title); Pierpaolo Vaccarino (collection stamp on the half title). A lovely set of the first edition of a noted French work on fruit trees, with beautifully hand colored plates. "Louis Noisette was the son of a gardener and followed the same occupation in 1795, after his military service, when he took charge of the gardens and greenhouses of the Val de Grace hospital in Paris. Three years later he was renting land for his own nursery garden in the Faubourg Saint-Jacques. Once his garden was established he travelled to Hungary with Prince Esterhazy, furnishing the Prince's new plantations there. As Noisette's reputation and his nursery's stock both grew he started a larger garden for trees and fruit at Fontenay-les-Roses, before moving to Montrouge in 1836. The Noisette nursery is credited with the introduction to France of many new North American plants, a specialty that myst have been helped by Louis's brother Philippem who was for some years a nurseryman in Charleston, South Carolina ... Although Louis Noisette wrote or contributed to several other gardening books, Le Jardin Fruitier, first published in fifteen parts from 1813-1821, is devoted to a subject in which the French had long been leaders, the cultivation and training of fruit trees. The history, culture and uses of all the fruits are described, with advice on cultivation beginning with planting seeds, before going on to grafting and other methods of traininng and shaping trees for the best results" (Oak Spring Pomona). The vast majority of the beautifully engraved and hand colored plates are after the 1768 first edition of Duhamel's Traite des Arbres Fruitiers . A second edition of Noisette's work would be published in twenty-six parts between 1832 and 1839, with the plates by Bessa, with each figure from the first edition on separate plates. Raphael, Oak Spring Pomona 43; Nissen, BBI 1450; Pritzel 6733.

$9500.00

Indigenous Flowers of the Hawaiian Islands: Forty-Four Plates Painted in Water-Colours and Described by Mrs. Francis Sinclair, Jr.
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Indigenous Flowers of the Hawaiian Islands: Forty-Four Plates Painted in Water-Colours and Described by Mrs. Francis Sinclair, Jr.

By SINCLAIR, Isabella (1842-1900)

London: Sampson Low, Marston, Searle, and Rivington, 1885. Small folio. (14 1/8 x 10 1/8 inches). [12]pp. 44 chromolithographed plates, printed by Leighton Brothers, each with accompanying text leaf. Publisher's cloth, upper cover pictorially stamped in gilt, expertly recased, brown endpapers, gilt edges Provenance: Peabody Institute (bookplate, small inked stamp on title and on verso of the plates) First edition of "One of the most prized of Hawaiian books among collectors" (Forbes): this copy in the original publisher's decorative cloth binding. In the preface, the author writes: "The following collection of flowers was made upon the islands of Kauai and Niihau, the most northern of the Hawaiian archipelago. It is not by any means a large collection, considering that the flowering plants of the islands are said by naturalists to exceed four hundred varieties. But this enumeration was made some years ago, and it is probable that many plants have become extinct since then." Her wonderfully illustrated work would be the first book dedicated to Hawaiian flora to be illustrated in colour. Isabella Sinclair (nee McHutcheson), was born in Scotland in 1840, married her cousin Frank Sinclair in 1863 and moved to Hawaii that year. Having studied botany in New Zealand, Sinclair began painting watercolors of the Hawaiian flora, carefully identifying each specimen with its botanical name as provided by Joseph Hooker, along with its natural habitat, its native name and other information. As Forbes notes, the work was an early example of a perfect binding and as such copies tend to be found loose in their bindings with subsequent damage to the plates and leaves. This example beautifully bound and in very fine condition internally. Stafleu TL2 12.024; Forbes 3736; Nissen 1848; Great Flower Books p. 76.

$6000.00

Botanic Plants Drawn by a Lady for Mrs. Bliss [manuscript title]
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Botanic Plants Drawn by a Lady for Mrs. Bliss [manuscript title]

By BOTANICAL DRAWINGS

[Great Britain, 1800. Folio. (18 1/4 x 11 1/2). Manuscript title in gold within floral and architectural wreath including pansies, roses, daffodils and a passion flower, 45 watercolours of flowers, most with contemporary pencil captions below the images, on wove paper watermarked 1797-1801. Contemporary half red morocco and marbled paper covered boards, flat spine ruled and lettered in gilt Provenance: Mrs. Bliss (title inscription); William Carlyon, Tregrehan, Cornwall (armorial bookplate); William H. Schab Gallery, Four Centuries of Fine Illustrated Books (1962), item 143. Beautiful album of botanical watercolours, possibly by Mary Lawrance. Mary Lawrance (later Mrs. Kearse) exhibited at the Royal Academy from 1795 to 1830. She belonged to a period when flower painting was considered one of the necessary social accomplishments for ladies and was able to charge half-a-guinea a lesson. She "is said to have been the possessor of much personal charm and exceedingly popular in London ... [she] obtained her botanical specimens for her drawings from various nursery gardens, including the famous Vineyard nursery at Hammersmith ... It was thought to be an honour for the owner as well as for the flower when Miss Lawrence painted its portrait" (Henrey II,pp.580-581). The drawings here are of very high quality, lightly sketched in pencil, and accomplished with watercolour, bodycolour and finished with gun arabic. The possible attribution to Mary Lawrance is based principally on the presence of two images of the passion flower (including the one on the highly decorative manuscript title). Although undated, the watermarks confirm that these drawings were accomplished circa 1800, just at the time that Lawrance was working on her now-fantastically-rare A Collection of Passion Flowers (1799-1800). Sold by William H. Schab Gallery in 1962, their catalogue description identifies Mrs. Bliss as Elizabeth Clement Breed (1778-1829) and suggests that the drawings were presented to her by Enos Bliss (1765-1852) on their marriage on 11 March 1801.

$22500.00

Chinese Natural History Drawings selected from the Reeves Collection in the British Museum (Natural History)
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Chinese Natural History Drawings selected from the Reeves Collection in the British Museum (Natural History)

By WHITEHEAD, P. J. P. and P. I. EDWARDS

London: Trustees of the British Museum (Natural History), 1974. Folio. Color plates. Publisher's brown morocco backed cloth boards. Housed in the publisher's folding box. Limited to 400 numbered copies The Reeves collection of early nineteenth-century water-colours is one of the largest sets of natural history drawings in the British Museum (Natural History). Some 2000 animals and plants are depicted by Chinese artists under the supervision of John Reeves of Canton. Twenty selected drawings are reproduced in high quality in this volume using the collotype process.

$375.00

Livre des differentes espèces d'Oiseaux de la Chine tires du Cabinet du Roy ... [Bound with:] Livre des differentes espèces d'Oiseaux, Fleurs, Plantes, et Trophés de la Chine ... 2.e Partie ... [Bound with:] ... 3.e Partie ... [Bound with] ... 4.e Partie
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Livre des differentes espèces d'Oiseaux de la Chine tires du Cabinet du Roy ... [Bound with:] Livre des differentes espèces d'Oiseaux, Fleurs, Plantes, et Trophés de la Chine ... 2.e Partie ... [Bound with:] ... 3.e Partie ... [Bound with] ... 4.e Partie

By HUQUIER, Gabriel (1695-1772), engraver; Jean Baptiste OUDRY (1686-1755), after; and others

Paris, 1745. Four parts in one, folio. (24 1/3 x 18 5/8 inches). 60 hand-coloured engraved plates by Huquier after Jean Baptiste Oudry and others (numbered 1-60), on laid paper watermarked 1742, each inlaid into a larger sheet of laid paper within the album at a contemporary date. Caption titles as above in the lower corner on the first plate of each part. Extra-illustrated with a contemporary original watercolour, also on laid paper, of plate 29. Expertly bound to style in period russia, covers elaborately bordered in gilt with a central gilt device comprised of small tools, spine with raised bands in eight compartments, red and black morocco lettering pieces in the second and third, the others with a repeat decoration in gilt, marbled endpapers and edges An extraordinary collection of large lavishly engraved plates with original 18th century hand-colouring of Chinese birds, flowers, vases and objects: the dénoument of French Rococo Chinoiserie. Huquier was among the most prominent French engravers, printsellers and tastemakers of the mid-18th century, designing or reproducing a prolific amount of ornamentation. The present collection of four suites containing sixty hand-coloured engravings of birds, flowers, botanical arrangements and objects presents the best Chinoiserie of the period. The first part is entirely dedicated to Asian birds; of the other three parts, approximately 25 plates depict intricate and colorful floral arrangements, many in elaborate chinoiserie inspired vases; six depict Asian flora with birds in natural settings; and the remaining illustrate Chinese objects including vessels, snuff boxes and other objects d'art. Besides being a talented designer and engraver, Huquier assembled an impressive collection of art, dispersed in three auctions in 1761, 1771 and 1772, including what is believed to be the largest collection of original watercolours by Oudry. An album of watercolours of birds by Oudry (and presumably from Huquier's collection) is now located at Harvard's Fogg Museum, and confirms that the images of birds in the plates present here were engraved by Huquier after Oudry. Besides having a relationship with Oudry, Huquier was known to have engraved Chinoiserie designs after Fraisse, Watteau, Boucher and others, suggesting other artists of the present engravings. However, given Huquier's own artistic talents, it is quite possible that many of the engravings are after his own work. The extra-illustration of a contemporary watercolour of plate 29, though unattributed, may be by Huquier. The strictly contemporary hand colouring of the plates in this album is simply superb. The extreme high quality of the colouring, coupled with the contemporary inlaid presentation of the plates and the original watercolour, suggests that the album was assembled for a collector of note in the mid-18th century. A similar album, also containing sixty plates, sold in the 1772 auction of Huquier's estate (as lot no. 157, selling for 380 livres). In addition, a similar album of the same four parts comprised of 60 hand coloured plates, extra illustrated with 12 original watercolours in the rear, is located at the Institut National d'Histoire de l'Art, Paris. We find no examples of this work selling at auction since the 18th century, Nissen IVB 465; Lewine, p. 248; Cohen, p. 274; Bruand and Hebert, Inventaire du Fonds Français, Graveurs du XVIIIe Siècle , #1953-2012. cf. Mary Morton, editor. Oudry's Painted Menagerie (2007); cf. Hal Opperman, Jean Baptiste Oudry (1977); Susan Miller, "Jean Antoine Fraisse, grave par Huquier" in Metropolian Museum Journal , vol. 31 (1996), pp. 127-130; Y. Bruand, "Un Grand Collectionneur, Marchand et Graveur du XVIIIe Siècle, Gabriel Huquier (1695-1772)," in Gazette des Beaux-Arts (1950), pp. 99-114.

$165000.00

The Natural History of Carolina, Florida, and the Bahama Islands: containing the figures of birds, beasts, fishes, serpents, insects, and plants; particularly, those not hitherto described, or incorrectly figured by former authors, with their descriptions in English and French
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The Natural History of Carolina, Florida, and the Bahama Islands: containing the figures of birds, beasts, fishes, serpents, insects, and plants; particularly, those not hitherto described, or incorrectly figured by former authors, with their descriptions in English and French

By CATESBY, Mark (1683-1749)

London: Printed for Charles Marsh, Thomas Wilcox and Benjamin Stichall, 1754. 2 volumes, folio. Titles in French and English and printed in red and black, parallel text printed in double columns in French and English. 1 double-page hand-coloured engraved map, 220 hand-coloured etched plates (218 by and after Catesby, most signed with his monogram, plates 61 and 96 in volume II by Georg Dionysius Ehret). With the 4pp. letterpress Catalogue of the Animals and Plants Represented in Catesby's Natural History, from the third edition, here inserted in the rear of the second volume. (Scattered minor foxing). Contemporary russia, covers bordered in gilt, expertly rebacked to style, expert restoration to the board edges and corners, marbled endpapers Provenance: Manchester Library (armorial bookplate) The second edition of the "most famous colorplate book of American plant and animal life ... a fundamental and original work for the study of American species" (Hunt). A beautiful and vastly important work by the founder of American ornithology, this book embodies the most impressive record made during the colonial period of the natural history of an American colony and is the most significant work of American natural history before Audubon. Trained as a botanist, Catesby travelled to Virginia in 1712 and remained there for seven years, sending back to England collections of plants and seeds. With the encouragement of Sir Hans Sloane and others, Catesby returned to America in 1722 to seek materials for his Natural History; he travelled extensively in Carolina, Georgia, Florida, and the Bahamas, sending back further specimens. His preface provides a lengthy account of the development of this work, including his decision to study with Joseph Goupy in order to learn to etch his copper plates himself to ensure accuracy and economy. The end result is encyclopaedic: Catesby provides information not only on the botany and ornithology of the area, but also on its history, climate, geology and anthropology. Catesby writes in the preface of his method of working: "As I was not bred a Painter, I hope some faults in Perspective, and other niceties, may be more readily excused: for I humbly conceive that Plants, and other Things done in a Flat, if an exact manner, may serve the Purpose of Natural History, better in some Measure, than in a mere bold and Painter-like Way. In designing the Plants, I always did them while fresh and just gathered: and the Animals, particularly the Birds, I painted while alive (except a very few) and gave them their Gestures peculiar to every kind of Birds, and where it could be admitted, I have adapted the Birds to those Plants on which they fed, or have any relation to. Fish, which do not retain their colours when out of their Element, I painted at different times, having a succession of them procured while the former lost their colours... Reptiles will live for many months...so that I had no difficulty in painting them while living" (Vol.I, p.vi). The first edition was published in ten parts, with the final part appearing in 1743, plus the twenty plate appendix, which was issued four years later. Work appears to have begun on the present second edition almost immediately, if not simultaneously with the publication of the Appendix in 1747. According to Stafleu & Cowan, the second edition was published between 1748 and 1756. Recent discoveries have suggested that there are multiple issues of the second edition, including early issues that may partly be comprised by sheets from the first edition. The present set includes the first twenty text leaves in their corrected state. References: Cf. Anker 94; cf. Dunthorne 72; cf. Fine Bird Books (1990) p.86; cf. Great Flower Books (1990) p.87; cf Hunt 486 (1st edition); cf. Jackson Bird Etchings p.76; cf. Meisel III, p.341; cf. Nissen BBI 336; cf. Nissen IVB 177; cf. Ripley Yale p.55; Sabin 11508; cf. Stafleu & Cowan TL2 1057; Wood p.281 ('A rare printing') Literature: E.G. Allen 'The History of American Ornithology before Audubon' in Transactions of the American Philosophical Society , new series, vol.41, part 3 (Philadelphia: October 1951) Amy Meyers & Margaret Pritchard Empire's Nature, Mark Catesby's New World Vision (Williamsburg, 1998) Edwin Wolf 2nd, A Flock of Beautiful Birds (Philadelphia, 1977), pp.5-7 (Catesby "was the first to observe and depict North American birds in their natural settings, combining ornithological details with botanic ones") E. Charles Nelson and David J. Elliott, The Curious Mister Catesby (University of Georgia Press, 2015).

$285000.00

An album of drawings and watercolours of natural history and topographical subjects, and including a original watercolour of a bouquet of bluebells and wood-anemones by Margaret Meen
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An album of drawings and watercolours of natural history and topographical subjects, and including a original watercolour of a bouquet of bluebells and wood-anemones by Margaret Meen

By ALBUM AMICORUM

[Great Britain, first quarter 19th century]. Quarto. (12 11/16 x 12 5/8 inches). 29 drawings or watercolours, each corner mounted. Early English red straight-grained morocco gilt, covers with border defined by an inner and outer single fillet rule, containing cornerpieces built up from an acorn-on-a-leaf tool and other small tools, spine in six compartments with double raised bands, lettered (in the second) 'Recueil / des / talens/' and 'et de / l'amitie' (in the third), the fourth and fifth compartments blank, the first and sixth with elaborate repeat tooling made up from numerous small tools and pointillé work, gilt turn-ins, marbled endpapers, g.e. Provenance: Marquis of Bute A rare and beautifully bound collection of original drawings and watercolours, including a work by Margaret Meen "the most outstanding woman painter associated with Kew [Gardens] in the eighteenth century" (Mabley) and an early representation of one of Australia's most spectacular butterflies, the Cape York Birdwing (Troides priamus pronomus) Although there is no indication of provenance, this is one of a number of albums recently sold from Mountstuart, the Bute family home on the island of Bute. The group of friends which this album commemorates likely came from the circle of John, Third Earl of Bute. He died in 1792, leaving a magnificent collection of botanical drawings, and this album was perhaps compiled by one of his children. The most outstanding natural history item within the album is a watercolour of bluebells and wood anemones by Margaret Meen whose very rare Exotic plants from the Royal Gardens at Kew was published in 1790. Amongst the other natural history items are botanical works by M. Austen (a watercolour and bodycolour drawing including crocus, snowdrop and roses), S. Smyth (a watercolour and bodycolour drawing of pink and white flowering mallows), and A. Holland (?) (a fine watercolour and bodycolour drawing on vellum of nasturtiums).Other natural history works include pen, ink and bodycolour drawing of a Baltimore Oriole by Lord de Tabley (dated 1826), and a gouache drawing of the Cape York Birdwing butterfly ( Troides priamus pronomus ) by E.Morland,and here titled 'Papilio priamus'. The other pictures include pieces by William Payne (romantic Italianate fishing village), Jane Machill (a finely executed watercolour of two angles , ?copied from an old master), S.Knott (a watercolour of a sailing vessel in a coastal landscape), C. Gibson (a charming watercolour of a mother and two children picnicing), G. Smyth (a watercolour of river valley), F. Dixon (a watercolour copy of a costume print, titled in German and in French 'Un Paysan de la haute Carniole en Habit d'Ete'), J. Rawstorne (a pencil drawing on vellum of a child), T. Sunderland (a drawing in brown ink with grey and blue washes of a stone bridge and cottage, figures and cattle in the foreground, with mountains in the background), M. Dixon (an oil sketch on thin card of a farmyard scene), A. Wickham (a watercolour sketch of an inn by a lakeside, hills in the background), H. Dalrymple (a watercolour in the neo-classical style with cupid in a chariot drawn by tigers all against a black background), and finally, an anonymous watercolour (inscribed on the verso 'Gorsey Lea Cottage - Miss Hopwood's. / near Middleton - Lancashire,' the mount is dated '1815'. For Meen see: Blunt & Stearn. The Art of Botanical Illustration (1994), pp.221-222; Henrey III, pp.248, 577; Richard Mabey The Flowering of Kew , (1988), p.42.

$8750.00

Figures of the Most Beautiful, Useful and Uncommon Plants Described in the Gardeners Dictionary exhibited on three hundred copper plates, accurately engraved after drawings taken from nature, with the characters of their flowers and seed vessels, drawn when they were in their greatest perfection
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Figures of the Most Beautiful, Useful and Uncommon Plants Described in the Gardeners Dictionary exhibited on three hundred copper plates, accurately engraved after drawings taken from nature, with the characters of their flowers and seed vessels, drawn when they were in their greatest perfection

By MILLER, Philip (1691-1771)

London: Printed for the Author; and sold by John Rivington [and others], 1755. 2 volumes, folio. (16 1/2 x 10 3/4 inches). Engraved allegorical headpiece to the dedication leaf after and by J. S. Miller, woodcut headpiece and initial-frame. 300 hand-coloured engraved plates (two folding) after G. D. Ehret, J. Bartram, W. Houston, R. Lancake and J. S. Miller by Miller, T. Jefferys, and J. Mynde. Uncut. Contemporary marrbled paper boards, expertly rebacked to style in tan calf, spine gilt with raised bands. Housed in a slipcase. A lovely set of the first edition of Miller's illustrated supplement to his overwhelmingly popular Gardeners Dictionary. While conceived as a complement to an earlier publication, Miller's Figures of ... Plants "is a sufficiently complete work and may be rated on its own merits" (Hunt). In the preface, Miller stated his intention of publishing one figure of a plant for every known genus, but abandoned this in favor of, "...those Plants only, which are either curious in themselves, or may be useful in Trades, Medicine, &c. including the Figures of such new Plants as have not been noticed by any former Botanists." The plants illustrated were either engraved from drawings of specimens in the Chelsea Physic Garden or drawings supplied by Miller's numerous correspondents, including John Bartram, the Pennsylvania naturalist (cf. plate 272), and Dr. William Houston, who travelled widely in the Americas and West Indies and bequeathed Miller his papers, drawings, and herbarium (cf. plates 44 and 182). For the plants drawn from examples in the Garden, Miller employed Richard Lancake and two of the leading botanical artists and engravers of the period, Georg Dionysius Ehret and Johann Sebastian Miller. Like Miller's Catalogus Plantarum, many of the etched and engraved plates are delicately printed in colour (i.e. green) to give a more life-like impression after hand colouring. The work was published by subscription in 50 monthly parts, with each part containing 6 plates, between 25 March 1755 and 30 June 1760. Two later editions were published in 1771 and 1809. Complete sets of the first edition are scarce, particularly in such lovely original condition. Nissen BBI 1378; Great Flower Books p. 121; Dunthorne 209; Henrey 1097; Hunt 566; Stafleu and Cowen TL2 6059; Pritzel 6241.

$22500.00

Illustratio Systematis Sexualis Linnaei ... An Illustration of the Sexual System of Linnaeus
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Illustratio Systematis Sexualis Linnaei ... An Illustration of the Sexual System of Linnaeus

By MILLER, John (1715?-1790?)

London: published and sold by the author, 1777. One volume bound in two, folio. (20 3/4 x 14 1/4 inches). Engraved frontispiece, engraved title, 4 engraved plates of botanical details, 104 engraved plates, each in two states (uncolored and finely hand colored; 66 of the hand colored plates also before letters), all by and after Miller. Extra-illustrated with 9 additional plates, each in uncolored and colored states (one before letters). 104 plates, each in two states: hand-coloured before letters and uncoloured with letters, with 9 additional plates, each in two states as above. 1 p. list of subscribers, 2 pp. errata at back of second volume. Contemporary English red straight-grained morocco gilt in the style of Staggemeier and Welcher, covers with wide decorative borders of fillets enclosing drawer-handle roll, decorative corner-pieces, spine in eight compartments with double-raised bands decorated in gilt, green silk endpapers, gilt edges A fantastic example of the first edition, with the plates in both coloured and uncoloured states, in a glorious contemporary binding and extra-illustrated with plates not usually found. The usual requirement is for 104 plates present in two states and 4 plates in only one state. The present copy includes all 108 plates from the first edition present in two states. The work is further enhanced by the presence of the contemporary addition of the "extra-illustrations." These include the "Tea Plant" plate, also in two states, inserted with the descriptive text leaf in the correct position in Linnæan class XIII in volume I; the 7 "Icones Novæ" plates (dated 1780 in the imprint) in two states; and at the end of the second volume, an unrecorded plate of a climbing lily (Gloriosa Superba), also in two states (the uncolored state on wove paper watermarked "1794," the handcolored state before letters). The work was issued in 20 parts between 1770 and 1777. According to the list of subscribers, 105 copies were ordered by 85 individuals. The uncolored plates invariably included lettering for scientific purposes, while the handcolored plates are often without lettering and the vast majority are printed using a warm brown ink with the intent of making the images more aesthetically pleasing. The plants described and illustrated came in the main from Dr. John Fothergill's famous garden in Upton, Essex. Fothergill was an enthusiastic supporter and indeed superintendent of the work, but refused Miller's attempt to dedicate the work to him. He felt that dedications were "more productive of envy to the patron, than of advantage to the author." John Miller (1715-1780), born Johann Sebastian Müller in Nuremberg, came to England in 1744 and remained there for the rest of his life. He was a botanical artist and engraver of considerable repute and came to the attention of the great naturalist Linnæus through the connection of John Ellis. Linnæus had nothing but praise for the artist, stating that the plates were "more beautiful and more accurate" than any he had ever seen. Referring to the work, Lettsom in his 1789 Memoirs of John Fothergill writes: an "immense work of botany wherein the pencil of Miller illustrated, in a style of unprecedented elegance, the sexual system of Linnæus." Dunthorne 207; Great Flower Books (1990) p.120; Henrey III, 1153; Nissen BBI 1372; Sprague 'John Sebastian Miller's Icones Novae' in Journal of Botany , vol. 74 (London: 1936), pp.208-209; cf. J. C. Lettsom, The Memoirs of John Fothergill [1789], p. 106.

$45000.00

A New Illustration of the Sexual System of Linnaeus by ... Thornton [The Genera of Exotic and Indigenous Plants that are to be met with in Great Britain; arranged according to the reformed system, by ... Thornton]
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A New Illustration of the Sexual System of Linnaeus by ... Thornton [The Genera of Exotic and Indigenous Plants that are to be met with in Great Britain; arranged according to the reformed system, by ... Thornton]

By THORNTON, Robert John (circa 1768-1837)

London: published by Dr. Thornton, 1801. 2 parts in one volume, folio. (18 5/8 x 12 7/8 inches). Engraved title to each part, engraved allegorical frontispiece titled Cupid, Flora, Ceres and Esculapius Honouring the Bust of Linnaeus, engraved portrait frontispiece of Queen Charlotte, engraved allegorical plate titled Cupid Inspiring Plants with Love, 16 engraved portraits of botanists on 14 sheets, 43 engraved plates on 42 leaves (including 34 botanical illustrations and 9 engraved pages of text or tables), all uncoloured. (Some spotting and browning, numerous blindstamps, 2 botanical plates shaved into the image area). Later half calf over textured cloth-covered boards (upper joint split) Provenance: Chetham Library, Manchester, England (blindstamps) An extraordinary offshoot of Thornton's larger work of the same name With this work, an offshoot of his larger masterpiece of the same title, Thornton attempted to explain Linnaean botany, as well as expound upon his own botanical theories. The work celebrates great contemporary and historical botanists and their supporters and also includes plates of many cross-sections of plant stems. The logic of the work is elusive, but what is undeniable is that, like its larger cousin, the present work includes some very charming plates, particularly the allegorical ones and the intriguing image of the dragon arum. The chaotic publication of Thornton's masterpiece, the seeminglly haphazard order in which plates, text, tables were published, and the work's final ignominious fate as prizes in a lottery draw have all meant that there is no definitive bibliographical description for either the large-scale work or the present somewhat smaller offshoot.

$1000.00

Chlora perfoliata
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Chlora perfoliata

By ETTINGSHAUSEN, Constantin Freiherr Von (1826-1897), and POKORNY, Alois (1826-1886)

Vienna: Hof- und Staatsdruckerei, 1856. 'Nature printed' in brown ink, with titling and imprint in black, by the Vienna Hof- und Staatsdruckerei. A beautiful example from "most important work produced by nature printing ever published" (Stafleu). To the modern eye this plate has an almost photographic beauty to it, which, in aesthetic terms, foreshadows the work of the great early-20th century photographers such as Man Ray. However, this achievement is almost certainly incidental as von Ettingshausen's intention was to present a detailed anatomical portrait using the highly exacting method of nature printing. John Lindley writes "Attempts were long since made to obtain Botanical portraits by printing from the plants themselves, flattened and otherwise prepared for the purpose... The process of the Imperial Printing Office [Hof- und Staatsdruckerei] at Vienna, to which the name of Nature-Printing has been happily applied.. is a great improvement upon the old method, inasmuch as it represents not only general form with absolute accuracy, but also surface, hairs, veins, and other minutiae of superficial structure by which plants are known irrespective of the hidden details of their hidden organization. Moreover, an exact copy in copper of the part to be represented being employed by the printer, instead of so fragile an object as the plant itself, we obtain the means of multiplying copies to the same extent as in copperplate engraving; and hence the method becomes suitable for purposes of publication." (Preface of 'The Ferns of Great Britain and Ireland... Edited by John Lindley... Nature-printed by Henry Bradbury') . The present plate was printed under the supervision of Alois Auer, the inventor of the nature printing process, at the Vienna state press. Von Ettingshausen, an Austrian botanist, palaeontologist and mineralogist, was a keen supporter of nature printing and published a number of other works using the process (the Bradley Bibliography lists 24 titles under his name). Pokorny worked with von Ettingshausen to improve the quality of nature printing and worked as a teacher and lecturer at various establishments in Vienna, lecturing on phytogeography at the university from 1857-1868. Cf. Fischer 69; cf. Hunt Printmaking in the Service of Botany (1986) 60; cf. Nissen BBI 613; cf. Pritzel 2756; cf. Stafleu & Cowan TL2 1723.

$225.00

Cerastium  brachypetalum
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Cerastium brachypetalum

By ETTINGSHAUSEN, Constantin Freiherr Von (1826-1897), and POKORNY, Alois (1826-1886)

Vienna: Hof- und Staatsdruckerei, 1856. 'Nature printed' in brown ink, with titling and imprint in black, by the Vienna Hof- und Staatsdruckerei. A beautiful example from "most important work produced by nature printing ever published" (Stafleu). To the modern eye this plate has an almost photographic beauty to it, which, in aesthetic terms, foreshadows the work of the great early-20th century photographers such as Man Ray. However, this achievement is almost certainly incidental as von Ettingshausen's intention was to present a detailed anatomical portrait using the highly exacting method of nature printing. John Lindley writes "Attempts were long since made to obtain Botanical portraits by printing from the plants themselves, flattened and otherwise prepared for the purpose... The process of the Imperial Printing Office [Hof- und Staatsdruckerei] at Vienna, to which the name of Nature-Printing has been happily applied.. is a great improvement upon the old method, inasmuch as it represents not only general form with absolute accuracy, but also surface, hairs, veins, and other minutiae of superficial structure by which plants are known irrespective of the hidden details of their hidden organization. Moreover, an exact copy in copper of the part to be represented being employed by the printer, instead of so fragile an object as the plant itself, we obtain the means of multiplying copies to the same extent as in copperplate engraving; and hence the method becomes suitable for purposes of publication." (Preface of 'The Ferns of Great Britain and Ireland... Edited by John Lindley... Nature-printed by Henry Bradbury') . The present plate was printed under the supervision of Alois Auer, the inventor of the nature printing process, at the Vienna state press. Von Ettingshausen, an Austrian botanist, palaeontologist and mineralogist, was a keen supporter of nature printing and published a number of other works using the process (the Bradley Bibliography lists 24 titles under his name). Pokorny worked with von Ettingshausen to improve the quality of nature printing and worked as a teacher and lecturer at various establishments in Vienna, lecturing on phytogeography at the university from 1857-1868. Cf. Fischer 69; cf. Hunt Printmaking in the Service of Botany (1986) 60; cf. Nissen BBI 613; cf. Pritzel 2756; cf. Stafleu & Cowan TL2 1723.

$225.00

Anemone nemorosa; A. ranunculoides
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Anemone nemorosa; A. ranunculoides

By ETTINGSHAUSEN, Constantin Freiherr Von (1826-1897), and POKORNY, Alois (1826-1886)

Vienna: Hof- und Staatsdruckerei, 1856. 'Nature printed' in brown ink, with titling and imprint in black, by the Vienna Hof- und Staatsdruckerei. A beautiful example from "most important work produced by nature printing ever published" (Stafleu). To the modern eye this plate has an almost photographic beauty to it, which, in aesthetic terms, foreshadows the work of the great early-20th century photographers such as Man Ray. However, this achievement is almost certainly incidental as von Ettingshausen's intention was to present a detailed anatomical portrait using the highly exacting method of nature printing. John Lindley writes "Attempts were long since made to obtain Botanical portraits by printing from the plants themselves, flattened and otherwise prepared for the purpose... The process of the Imperial Printing Office [Hof- und Staatsdruckerei] at Vienna, to which the name of Nature-Printing has been happily applied.. is a great improvement upon the old method, inasmuch as it represents not only general form with absolute accuracy, but also surface, hairs, veins, and other minutiae of superficial structure by which plants are known irrespective of the hidden details of their hidden organization. Moreover, an exact copy in copper of the part to be represented being employed by the printer, instead of so fragile an object as the plant itself, we obtain the means of multiplying copies to the same extent as in copperplate engraving; and hence the method becomes suitable for purposes of publication." (Preface of 'The Ferns of Great Britain and Ireland... Edited by John Lindley... Nature-printed by Henry Bradbury') . The present plate was printed under the supervision of Alois Auer, the inventor of the nature printing process, at the Vienna state press. Von Ettingshausen, an Austrian botanist, palaeontologist and mineralogist, was a keen supporter of nature printing and published a number of other works using the process (the Bradley Bibliography lists 24 titles under his name). Pokorny worked with von Ettingshausen to improve the quality of nature printing and worked as a teacher and lecturer at various establishments in Vienna, lecturing on phytogeography at the university from 1857-1868. Cf. Fischer 69; cf. Hunt Printmaking in the Service of Botany (1986) 60; cf. Nissen BBI 613; cf. Pritzel 2756; cf. Stafleu & Cowan TL2 1723.

$225.00

[Apple] Pheonix Apple; Norman's Beauty
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[Apple] Pheonix Apple; Norman's Beauty

By BROOKSHAW, After George (1751-1823)

[London]: G. Brookshaw, 1812. Aquatint engraving, with some stipple, printed in colours and finished by hand. In excellent condition. A fine image from Brookshaw's masterpiece "Pomona Britannica; or, A Collection of the Most Esteemed Fruits," the finest work on fruit and flowers ever produced. Its breathtaking images display a level of technical virtuosity and beauty that distinguish this magnificent aquatint as a true work of art. Brookshaw produced this seminal botanical study late in his career, at first publishing it in parts and then as a complete edition in 1812. The fact that this outstanding work took ten years to complete is evident in the quality of its images and the care with which Brookshaw executed each individual picture. 'Pomona Britannica' was produced as a visual record of the best available varieties of fruit in an attempt to encourage gardeners to experiment with growing fruit, and illustrates examples found in the Royal gardens at Hampton Court, Kensington Gardens, and the private gardens of the Prince of Wales in Blackheath. 'Pomona Britannica' differs from other botanical works in its dark aquatinted backgrounds and its stylized compositions. By using aquatint to create a contrasting background, Brookshaw manages to produce a truly dramatic effect. His use of stylized composition distinguishes his pictures from the dry scientific illustrations found in other botanical studies and creates an exceptionally beautiful visual experience. 'Pomona Britannica' is not only a didactic study, it is a masterpiece of illustration in which every picture is a testament to the artist's talent and ingenuity. Cf. Dunthorne 50; cf. Great Flower Books (1990) p. 81; cf. Nissen BBI 244; cf. Sandra Raphael An Oak Spring Pomona 40a.

$4000.00

The Fruits and Fruit Trees of America; or, The Culture, Propagation, and Management, in the Garden and Orchard, of Fruit Trees generally...
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The Fruits and Fruit Trees of America; or, The Culture, Propagation, and Management, in the Garden and Orchard, of Fruit Trees generally...

By DOWNING, ANDREW JACKSON

New York: Wiley & Putnam, 1847. xiv,594pp. plus sixty-seven colored lithograph plates. Modern black morocco, spine gilt. Light scattered foxing, but plates generally clean, with tissue guards. With Beautiful Color Plates of American Fruits The first edition to contain colored plates of "the standard American pomological authority" (Hedrick). A.J. Downing and his brother, Charles, revolutionized both American landscape gardening and American fruit growing in the 1840s, the latter with the publication of this book in 1845. This 1847 edition employs the same plates, but it is printed on larger paper and adds the handsome color plates which only appear in this edition and one issued in 1850. After A.J. Downing's death, the book went through some twenty editions in the 19th century under Charles' editorship. The text makes no reference to the lovely plates of apples, pears, cherries, plums, berries, and other fruits, and as Plesch says, they "seem to have crept into the volume by stealth." The Plesch copy and the one recorded by Bennett each contain only sixty-nine plates; however, we have handled copies with varying numbers of plates, and this copy has sixty-seven. The plates were actually produced in Paris and shipped to America to be bound with the book. The final product is a lovely and important volume. Bennett, p.35; Hedrick, p.486; Meisel III, p.441; Oak Spring Pomona 60; Plesch Sale 219.

$12000.00

Catalogues of the birds, shells, and some of the more rare plants, of Dorsetshire. From the new and enlarged edition of Mr. Hutchins's history of that county ... With additions; and a brief memoir of the author
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Catalogues of the birds, shells, and some of the more rare plants, of Dorsetshire. From the new and enlarged edition of Mr. Hutchins's history of that county ... With additions; and a brief memoir of the author

By PULTENEY, Richard (1730-1801); and Thomas RACKETT (1757-1841)

[London: Printed by and for J. Nichols, Son, and Bentley, 1813. Folio. (19 1/2 x 12 inches). Text in two columns. iv, 110pp. Engraved portrait, 24 engraved plates on 13 sheets. Uncut. Some foxing. Later cloth-backed grey paper boards. Large-paper issue of the first illustrated edition of a rare catalogue of British birds, plants and shells. Richard Pulteney received his doctorate in medicine from the University of Edinburgh in 1764, before serving as the personal physician to the Earl of Bath. Following the Earl's death, he resided and practiced in Blandford, Dorset. Besides membership in a host of medical societies, Pulteney was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society, as well as a Fellow of the Linnean Society. Indeed, he was an early promoter of Linnaean taxonomy, and authored the first English biography of Linnaeus in 1781. His cabinet of specimens, noted particularly for its shells, was donated to the Linnean Society following his death in 1801. The first edition of 1799 was privately-published by Pulteney with few copies printed. An inscription in an extant copy by the editor of this new edition reveals that copies of the first edition were further destroyed by fire: "The first Impression of Dr. Pulteney's Catalogues was printed in 1801 [i.e. 1799], but never published, the whole having been destroyed by the fire, at Mr. Nichols's printing office [in 1808]. I have been enabled to make considerable additions in this second impression, from communication by various scientific friends, and from my own obervations." Rackett's revised edition was the first to be illustrated, containing a portrait of Pulteney, a plate depicting 17 shells titled Melbury Fossils (engraved by J. Cary after Mary Foster), and 23 engraved plates of shells on 12 sheets. The plates numbered I-XXIII are new engravings of those by De Costa in his Historia Naturalis Testaeorum Britanniae, with several additions, depicting over 200 species. The present copy is a very rare large-paper issue, printed on wove paper (the 1799 and regular issue of 1813 being on laid paper), with a variant title without imprint. This large-paper issue is not recorded by the usual bibliographies. BM(NH) IV:p. 1622; Pritzel 7367; Nissen, ZBI 3250.

$3500.00

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