Sign In | Register


RECENT ARRIVALS


Next >
Ornithology and Oölogy of New England
seller photo

Ornithology and Oölogy of New England

By SAMUELS, Edward A.

Boston: Nichols and Noyes, 1868. 8vo. (10 1/8 x 7 1/4 inches). 24 chromolithographed plates by John H. Buffords, 4 hand-coloured line engravings. Contemporary half brown morocco and brown cloth covered boards, spine with raised bands in six compartments, lettered in the second and fourth, the others with a repeat decoration in gilt, marbled endpapers A deluxe large paper, fully coloured issue. "In presenting this volume to the public, I would say that my chief aim in its preparation has been to supply the great demand for some work that might be accessible to all ... The want of such a volume is keenly appreciated by our students in this interesting branch of natural history; and, as all the editions of the valuable and popular works of Wilson and Nuttall are out of print, it has long been almost entirely unsupplied" (Preface). Samuels's work was issued in a variety of formats: with the 24 lithographed plates in black and white and the 4 plates of eggs coloured, with all the plates coloured (i.e. 24 chromolithographed plate and 4 hand coloured), and a large paper issue with all the plates coloured (like the present).

$800.00

The Birds of America, from Drawings made in the United States and Their Territories
seller photo

The Birds of America, from Drawings made in the United States and Their Territories

By AUDUBON, John James (1785-1851)

New York: George R. Lockwood, 1871. 8 volumes, octavo. (10 5/8 x 6 3/4 inches). Half-titles. 500 hand-coloured lithographic plates. Scattered foxing. Contemporary half brown morocco and marbled paper covered boards The rare final octavo edition of Audubon's Birds: an important monument of American colour plate books and natural history, and one of the most desirable books produced in 19th-century America. Ron Tyler, in Audubon's Great National Work , quotes a letter by the publisher's son, Richard B. Lockwood, noting that some time after 1870 the lithographed octavo plates were destroyed when they fell through the floors in a Philadelphia building. The date of the disaster at the Lockwood firm suggests that this final octavo edition was produced in 1871. The octavo edition of Audubon's The Birds of America is certainly the most famous and accessible of American color plate books. It served many purposes for Audubon. First, it was a moneymaker, successfully marketed throughout the United States on a scale that the great cost of the original . ..Birds... made impossible. Second, it was another step toward proving himself as good a scientific naturalist as the "closet" naturalists who had scorned him, combining a detailed text with careful observations next to his plates. Third, it allowed a more reasonable arrangement, by genus and species, than the headlong production of the original project had allowed. All of these steps were improvements, amply repaid by the book's success. The octavo . ..Birds.. . was originally issued in 100 parts, each containing five plates executed by the Philadelphia lithographer, J.T. Bowen. Changes in subscribers and increased press runs created numerous states of plates as they were reprinted. The whole story of the production of the book, with detailed information about every aspect of the project, is told by Ron Tyler in Audubon's Great National Work (Austin, 1993). The story Tyler tells of the difficulties of production and marketing are revealing of the whole world of colour printing in mid-19th-century America. Tyler Audubon's Great National Work , pp. 129, 165 note 10; Bennett, p.5 (this and subsequent references for the first octavo edition); Nissen IVB 51; Sabin 2364; McGrath, p.50; Reese Stamped with a National Character 35 (ref.).

$20000.00

Notornis Mantelli [Takahe]

By GOULD, John (1804-1881) and H.C. RICHTER

[London: by the Author, 1869. Hand-coloured lithograph by J. Gould and H.C.Richter, printed by Hullmandel & Walton in 'The Birds of Australia Supplement'. Sheet: 21 1/4 x 28 inches. Separation at center fold has been expertly repaired. A fine image from John Gould's major ornithological achievement 'The Birds of Australia'. This large addition Gould's 'Birds of Australia' appeared in the 1869 Supplement, which included birds of New Zealand. This flightless rail known as Notornis or Takahe on its native South Island was thought to be extinct. Its fossil remains had been studied and classified by Professor Owen, but a living specimen was found by Dr. Walter Mantell. The species continues to exist. John Gould, accompanied by his wife Elizabeth, left Britain for Australia in May 1838 for what was to be a two year exploration of the birds and animals of the region. The natural history of the continent had not been studied in any detail before Gould's arrival and the abundant and highly varied bird life was to prove an inspiration to him, and between 1840 and 1869 he published what is his undoubted masterpiece: "The Birds of Australia". Gould wrote of his time in Australia 'The interval spent from my native shores were some of the happiest days of my life... The results of my journey cannot, I think, but be attended with great advantage to science... Independently of a great new number of Birds I succeeded in procuring the nests and eggs of at least two thirds of the species inhabiting that interesting region'. Gould, Handbook of the Birds of Australia , vol. II; Cf. Fine Bird Books (1990), p.102; cf. Nissen IVB 370; cf. Sauer 9 & 18; cf. Zimmer p.255 & 259.

$6000.00

American Ornithology; or, the Natural History of Birds inhabiting the United States, not given by Wilson

By BONAPARTE, Charles Lucian (1803-1857)

Philadelphia: Samuel Augustus Mitchell [vol I]; Carey, Lea & Carey [vols II & III]; Carey & Lea [vol IV], 1833. 4 volumes, folio. (15 x 12 inches). 27 hand-colored engraved plates by Alexander Lawson (11 after Titian R. Peale, 15 after A. Rider, and 1 after J.J. Audubon and A. Rider). Vol. 4 uncut. Some foxing, browning and offsetting as ususal. Contemporary half red morocco and marbled paper covered boards, rebacked. First edition, first issues of this important American ornithological work: the first book appearance of any engraving after John James Audubon Bonaparte's important continuation of Wilson's American Ornithology describes 60 birds not in the original work. "A love for the same department of natural science, and a desire to complete the vast enterprise so far advanced by Wilson's labors, has induced us to undertake the present work," Bonaparte writes in the preface, "in order to illustrate what premature death prevented him from accomplishing, as well as the discoveries subsequently made in the feathered tribes of these States." "The work which had been performed by Wilson's hands alone now gave employment to several individuals. Titian R., the fourth son of Charles Wilson Peale, not only collected many of the birds figured while on the Long expedition, which were credited to Thomas Say, who originally described them in footnotes scattered through the report; or in a subsequent private trip to Florida during the winter and spring of 1825, under the patronage of Bonaparte; but also drew the figures engraved for the first, and two plates for the fourth and last volume. A German emigrant by the name of Alexander Rider, of whom little is known beyond that he was a miniature painter in 1813, and a portrait and historical painter in 1818, was responsible for the remainder of the drawings with the exception of the two figures of plate 4 of volume I..." (Frank L. Burns, On Alexander Wilson ). That plate, the Great Crow Blackbird, is notable as being the first book appearance of any engraving after John James Audubon. Perhaps the most influential artist involved with the work, however, was Bonaparte's master engraver Alexander Lawson, arguably the most talented ornithological engraver in America at that time. Multiple issues of the first edition of Wilson's continuation have been identified. This fine set is comprised of the rare first issue of vol. 1 (with the Mitchell imprint and containing an early issue of plate 6 in that volume [with the Latin name given as Pyrrhula Erythrina; see Ellis/Mengel]); and with first issues of volumes two through four (published by Carey, Lea & Carey or Carey & Lea and printed by William Brown). Carey & Lea would reissue the first volume with their own imprint after purchasing the rights to the publication from Mitchell in 1828 and all the volumes would be reprinted by T.K. and P.G. Collins (with their imprint replacing that of William Brown) for Carey & Lea, with unchanged dates on the titles but actually printed in about 1835. Anker 47; Bennett 16; Coues 1:609; Ellis/Mengel 312a-b; Fine Bird Books (1990) p. 78; Nissen IVB 116; Sabin 6264; Wood 247; Zimmer p.64.

$6500.00

The Birds of America, from Drawings made in the United States and Their Territories
seller photo

The Birds of America, from Drawings made in the United States and Their Territories

By AUDUBON, John James (1785-1851)

New York: George R. Lockwood, 1871. Eight volumes in four, octavo. (10 1/2 x 7 1/4 inches). Text only, without plates. Later half brown morocco and cloth covered boards, spine gilt with raised bands in five compartments The text to the rare final octavo edition of Audubon's Birds Ron Tyler, in Audubon's Great National Work , quotes a letter by the publisher's son, Richard B. Lockwood, noting that some time after 1870 the lithographed octavo plates were destroyed when they fell through the floors in a Philadelphia building. The date of the disaster at the Lockwood firm suggests that this final octavo edition was produced in 1871. The octavo edition of Audubon's The Birds of America is certainly the most famous and accessible of American books. It served many purposes for Audubon. First, it was a moneymaker, successfully marketed throughout the United States on a scale that the great cost of the original . ..Birds... made impossible. Second, it was another step toward proving himself as good a scientific naturalist as the "closet" naturalists who had scorned him, combining a detailed text with careful observations next to his plates. Third, it allowed a more reasonable arrangement, by genus and species, than the headlong production of the original project had allowed. All of these steps were improvements, amply repaid by the book's success. The octavo . ..Birds.. . was originally issued in 100 parts, each containing five plates executed by the Philadelphia lithographer, J.T. Bowen. Changes in subscribers and increased press runs created numerous states of plates as they were reprinted. The whole story of the production of the book, with detailed information about every aspect of the project, is told by Ron Tyler in Audubon's Great National Work (Austin, 1993). The story Tyler tells of the difficulties of production and marketing are revealing of the whole world of colour printing in mid-19th-century America. Unusually, the present set comprises the complete eight volume text in four volumes only, without the plates. Tyler Audubon's Great National Work , pp. 129, 165 note 10; Bennett, p.5 (this and subsequent references for the first octavo edition); Nissen IVB 51; Sabin 2364; McGrath, p.50; Reese Stamped with a National Character 35 (ref.).

$1500.00

Scientific Results of the Second Yarkand Mission
seller photo

Scientific Results of the Second Yarkand Mission

By STOLICZKA, Ferdinand (1838-1874); and others

London and Calcutta, 1891. Fifteen parts in two volumes, quarto. (14 1/2 x 10 7/8 inches). Detailed collations below. Publisher's upper wrappers for each part bound in. Later half green morocco and cloth covered boards, spine with raised bands in six compartments, ruled and lettered in gilt, marbled endpapers The very rare complete natural history reports of an important government-sponsored expedition in India. The complete report in 15 parts was published between 1878-1891 and served as part of the official justification for what essentially had been a move in the "Great Game." In 1873, the second Yarkand mission under Sir Douglas Forsyth was sent by Lord Northbrook, Viceroy of India, to cement British and Indian relations with Yakub Beg, the ruler of Chinese Turkestan and an important figure in the buffer region between Russia and India. The mission was well-equipped, as befitted an official government attempt to impress a local ruler and it is said that the Ladakh economy took four years to recover from the losses incurred from the passage of the expedition. The mission set out from Rawalpindi to Leh via Murree, travelled past the Pangong Lake, Changchenmo and Karakash Valley onto Shahidulla and finally to Yarkand. They reached Kashgar in December 1873, and on March 17, 1874 began the return journey. They were to visit the Pamir and Afghanistan areas but the political situation prohibited the passage and the party returned to India via Ladakh. Ferdinand Stoliczka, the mission's geologist and naturalist, made good use of the opportunities offered and made extensive observations. Unfortunately, he died before he was able to publish any of his work. His papers and notes were edited by various well-known scientists. The ornithological section is particularly notable for having been edited by Richard Bowdler Sharpe. The plates, all worked up from specimens collected by Stoliczka, are produced by three of the greatest ornithological artists of the late-19th century: Joseph Smit, William Hart and John Gerrard Keulemans. Given the 13-year publication in both London and Calcutta complete sets with all the parts are very rare. This set is comprised as follows: 1) Introductory Note and Map . London: Eyre and Spottiswoode, 1891. Introduction by A. O. Hume. vii pp. Large zincographed folding map, titled Preliminary Map of Eastern Turkestan, on banknote paper, hand coloured in outline. 2) V. BALL. Memoir of the Life and Work of Ferdinand Stolicka . London: Eyre and Spottiswoode, 1886. 36pp. 3) W. T. Blandford. Mammalia . Calcutta: Office of the Superintendent of Government Printing, 1879. iv, 94pp. 29 lithographed plates (19 hand coloured), after Smit, Keulemans, and others. 4) R. Bowdler SHARP. Aves . London: Taylor and Francis, 1891. xviii, [1], 153, [1]pp. 24 hand-coloured lithographed plates, by J. Smit (2), J.G. Keulemans (15), W. Hart (3) and one other, printed by Hanhart. Anker 465; Fine Bird Books (1990) p. 142; Nissen IVB 861; Christine Jackson Bird Illustrators some artists in early lithography (1975) pp.75-92. 5) Frederic MOORE. Lepidoptera . Calcutta: Office of the Superintendent of Government Printing, 1879. [2], 18pp. One hand-coloured lithographed plate with 27 figures after Butler, printed by Mintern Brothers. 6) H. W. BATES; and others. Coleoptera . Calcutta: Office of the Superintendent of Government Printing, 1890. 79, [1]pp., plus small format errata slip. Two lithographed plates after Purkiss and Wilson. 7) Frederick SMITH. Hymenoptera . Calcutta: Office of the Superintendent of Government Printing, 1878. [2], 22pp. One hand coloured lithographed plate, after Smith, printed by Mintern Brothers. 8) Robert McLACHLAN. Neuroptera . Calcutta: Office of the Superintendent of Government Printing, 1878. [2], 6pp. 9) W. L. DISTANT. Rhynchota . Calcutta: Office of the Superintendent of Government Printing, 1879. [2], 15, [1]pp. One hand coloured lithographed plate after Rippon. 10) O. P. CAMBRIDGE. Araneidea . Calcutta: Superintendent of Government Printing, 1885. [2], 115, [1]pp. Two lithographed plates after Tuffen West. 11) Geoffrey NEVILL. Mollusca . Calcutta: Office of the Superintendent of Government Printing, 1878. [2], 21, [1]pp. One lithographed plate after Mintern. 12) Francis DAY. Ichthyology . Calcutta: Office of the Superintendent of Government Printing, 1878. [2], 25, [1]pp. 5 lithographed plates after Achilles and others. 13) W. T. BLANDFORD. Reptilia and Amphibia . Calcutta: Office of the Superintendent of Government Printing, 1878. [2], 26, [4]pp. 2 lithographed plates after Mintern. 14) W. T. BLANDFORD. Geology . Calcutta: Office of the Superintendent of Government Printing, 1878. [2], 49, [1]pp. 15) P. Martin DUNCAN. Syringosphaeridae . Calcutta: Office of the Superintendent of Government Printing, 1879. [4], 17, [1], [6]pp. 3 lithographed plates after Foord. Nissen 4760.

$10000.00

Studer's Popular Ornithology. The Birds of North America
seller photo

Studer's Popular Ornithology. The Birds of North America

By STUDER, Jacob Henry (publisher). - Theodore JASPER (illustrator & editor)

Columbus, Ohio: published by Jacob H. Studer & Co, 1881. Small folio. 119 chromolithographic plates. Publisher's deluxe burgundy morocco, elaborately stamped in gilt and blind Rare example in the publisher's deluxe full morocco binding. Studer's stated purpose of offering an affordable guide to the birds of America was evidently successful, as this work proved to be enormously popular and, in a reduced form, went through a number of editions (the latest being in 1903). The work's importance lies in its success in stimulating an interest in ornithology in a wider audience than its more costly predecessors. Cf. Anker p.80; Bennett p.63; Fine Bird Books (1990) p.145; Nissen IVB 473; Wood p.406; Zimmer p.333.

$2000.00

A Monograph of the Phasianidae or Family of the Pheasants
seller photo

A Monograph of the Phasianidae or Family of the Pheasants

By ELLIOT, Daniel Giraud (1835-1915)

New York: published for the Author, 1872. 2 volumes, folio. (23 5/16 x 18 1/2 inches). 2pp. subscriber's list. 79 fine hand-colored lithographic plates (including 1 folding plate of feathers) after Joseph Wolf by Joseph Smit (58) or John Gerrard Keulemans (21), printed by M. & N. Hanhart and P.W.M. Trap, colored by J.D. White, 2 uncolored lithographic plates by and after Smit, on India paper mounted. Contemporary half dark purple morocco and purple cloth covered boards, spine with wide bands in six compartments, tooled in gilt on and on either side of each band, lettered in the second and fourth compartments, marbled endpapers, gilt edges Provenance: Archer (armorial bookplate) A very fine copy of the most splendid of Elliot's great monographs, and a rare American contribution to this elegant class of books. Issued in 6 parts between June 1870 and October 1872, A Monograph of the Phasianidae is described by Sitwell as "the equal in every way to any work by Gould". The magnificent size and beautiful coloring of the plates after Joseph Wolf's drawings reflect the importance which Elliot attached to the Phasianidae. Of all the families in the ornithological system, he regarded it as the one most vital to the human race, "containing within it the species that afford food for thousands of mankind, and also those which are the original source of all the domestic poultry met with throughout the civilized world." Both Zimmer and Wood note that Elliots text in this work is probably the finest of his monographs. The plates by Wolf (to whom The Pheasants is dedicated) earn him "the same rank as Audubon and Edward Lear as a bird-painter" (Fine Bird Books). R.M. Mengel gave the work further praise, writing that "of the great nineteenth-century ornithological monographs, none save Audubon's is so sumptuous" ("Beauty and the Beast: Natural History and Art," The Living Bird, 1979-1980). Anker 130; Fine Birds Books (1990), p. 95; T. Keulemans & J. Coldewey Feathers to brush... John Gerrard Keulemans 1982, p.61; Nissen IVB 295; Wood p. 331; Zimmer p. 206.

$140000.00

The Birds of Great Britain

By GOULD, John (1804-1881)

London: Taylor and Francis for the Author, 1873. 5 volumes, large folio. (21 1/2 x 15 inches). 5pp. list of subscribers. 367 hand-coloured lithographic plates, many heightened with gum arabic, after Gould, Henry Constantine Richter, Joseph Wolf and William Hart, most lithographed by Richter and Hart, printed by Walter or Walter & Cohn, 2 wood-engraved illustrations. Minor foxing to text, generally in the front of each vol. and not affecting plates. Early dark green half morocco and green cloth covered boards, spines with raised bands in six compartments, tooled on and on either side of each band, lettered in gilt in the second and fourth compartments. The first edition of the work of which Gould was most proud, here with a first issue of the Snowy Owl plate. This work is "the most sumptuous and costly of British bird books" (Mullens and Swann) and is described by Wood as "a magnificent work." Gould was most proud of this work, and it "was seen - perhaps partly because its subject was British, as the culmination of [his] ... genius" (Isabella Tree, The Ruling Passion of John Gould. London: 1991, p.207). The text is more extensive and the illustrations depict many more chicks, nests, and eggs than in Gould's other works: "there was an opportunity of greatly enriching the work by giving figures of the young of many of the species of various genera - a thing hitherto almost entirely neglected by authors" (Gould, writing in the preface to the present work). Wolf, who drew 57 of the plates and accompanied Gould on an ornithological tour of Scandinavia in 1856, was responsible for persuading Gould and Richter to adopt a livelier treatment of the subject matter. The work was issued in twenty-five parts and was very well received. Gould's illustrations were all painstakingly coloured by hand, as he states in his Preface: "Many of the public are quite unaware how the colouring of these large plates is accomplished; and not a few believe that they are produced by some mechanical process or by chromo-lithography. This, however, is not the case; every sky with its varied tints and every feather of each bird were coloured by hand; and when it is considered that nearly two hundred and eighty thousand illustrations in the present work have been so treated, it will most likely cause some astonishment to those who give the subject a thought." The stone from which the Snowy Owl plate (in vol.I) was printed was dropped and broken at an early stage in the printing. Later issues of this plate show evidence of this and the early issue - printed before the accident - are considered more desirable. Fine Bird Books (1990) p.102; Nissen IVB 372; Sauer 23; Wood p.365; Zimmer p.261.

$80000.00

The Avifauna of Laysan and the Neighbouring Islands: with a Complete History to Date of the Birds of the Hawaiian Possessions
seller photo

The Avifauna of Laysan and the Neighbouring Islands: with a Complete History to Date of the Birds of the Hawaiian Possessions

By ROTHSCHILD, Lionel Walter, Baron (1868-1937)

London: Taylor & Francis for R.H. Porter, 1900. 3 parts in two volumes, imperial quarto. (14 3/4 x 11 1/8 inches). 55 hand-coloured lithographic plates (53 of birds, 3 of nest and eggs), 6 tinted lithographic views and 2 uncoloured plates of anatomical details, all by and after J.G. Keulemans and F.W. Frohawk, printed by the Mintern Brothers, 20 colotype plates after Williams, printed by Bedford Lemaire & Co. Original publisher's pink wrappers bound in (part 2 front wrapper bound in as the title to the second vol., the other wrappers in the rear of vol. 2). Some repairs to wrappers. Early half morocco and cloth covered boards, spines with raised bands lettered in gilt, marbled endpapers The rare first edition of one of the most valuable records of the bird life of Hawaii: limited to 250 copies. Lord Rothschild explains the genesis of the work in the preface: "I was induced to take a great interest in the fauna of the Sandwich or Hawaiian Islands when I was an undergraduate at Cambridge, and Professor Newton showed me some of the wonderful species of birds discovered on those islands by Mr. Scott Wilson [co-author, with Arthur Humble Evans of Aves Hawaiienses: The Birds of the Sandwich Islands. London: 1890-1899]. At the time I had just engaged Mr. Henry Palmer to make a collection of birds, &c., for me on the Chatham Islands ... and determined that if the first trip turned out a success I would send him to the Sandwich Islands. On receipt of a most interesting collection from the Chatham Islands ... I immediately instructed Palmer to start for Honolulu, where he arrived in December 1890, and stayed on the Sandwich Islands until August 1893. During this period he collected 1832 birds on the following islands: - Oahu, Hawaii, Kauai. Maui, Lanai, Molokai, Niihau, Laysan, French Frigate Shoals, Lisiansky, and Midway ... Palmer procured all the known resident land-birds ... [with seven exceptions] which are all undoubtedly extinct, and most of the sea-birds. In addition to these Palmer discovered fifteen species entirely new to science, and several birds new to the islands." The majority of the plates are by John Gerard Keulemans (1842-1912), "the major bird book illustrator for 30 years at the end of the 19th century" (Christine Jackson). He is responsible for all the hand-coloured lithographs of birds, whilst Frederick William Frohawk (1861-1946) produced the three coloured plates of nest and eggs, two uncoloured lithographs of anatomical details and 6 tinted views. The remaining collotype plates are from photographs by Williams of Honolulu. As the text on the upper wrapper suggests this work was originally sold by subscription, with each of the three parts costing 3 guineas. The remaining copies that had not been taken up by the subscription were then offered at 12 guineas for the complete work. Forbes gives a detailed collation and it is clear that the intention was that the three parts should be bound into a single volume requiring just a single letterpress title page. The resulting volume would have been quite unwieldy, and the original owner of the present example took the happy decision to bind their copy in two volumes. Anker 429; Fine Bird Books (1990) p.135; Forbes Hawaiiian National Bibliography IV, 4497; Jackson Lithography p.88; Nissen IVB 794; Wood pp.543; Zimmer p. 532.

$35000.00

L'Histoire Naturelle éclaircie dans une de ses parties principales l'ornithologie, qui traite des oiseaux de terre, de mer et de riviere
seller photo

L'Histoire Naturelle éclaircie dans une de ses parties principales l'ornithologie, qui traite des oiseaux de terre, de mer et de riviere

By RAY, John (1628-1705); and François SALERNE (1705-1760)

Paris: Debure Pere, 1767. 4to. (11 1/4 x 8 1/2 inches). Half-title. xii, [4], 464pp. 31 engraved plates, engraved by and after Martinet, including the allegorical frontispiece. Contemporary mottled calf, covers bordered in blind, spine with raised bands in six compartments, red morocco lettering piece in the second, the others with a repeat decoration in gilt The first French edition of the ornithological portions of Ray's Synopsis methodica avium & piscium (London, 1713), A translation of John Ray's posthumous work in Latin, Synopsis Avium (1713), this edition greatly augmented by François Salerne with his own observations and others taken from Belon, Aldrovanus, Willughby, Gesner and Linnaeus. "The whole constitutes a work on ornithology of considerable value, furnishing a description of many species of birds, their habits, physical characters, vulgar names," (Wood) and other information. Of further note are the illustrations, engraved by and after Martinet. Anker 414; Cottrell 16l; Fine Birds Books (1990) p. 133; Keynes Ray 106; Nissen IVB 757; Nissen SVB 397; Ronsil 2683; Thiébaud 823.

$2500.00

Catalogue of a Collection of American Birds belonging to Philip Lutley Sclater
seller photo

Catalogue of a Collection of American Birds belonging to Philip Lutley Sclater

By SCLATER, Philip Lutley (1829-1913)

London: N. Trubner & Co, 1862. 8vo. Letterpress title with ornithological wood-engraved vignette by Pearson. 20 hand-coloured lithographed plates by and after John Jennens, printed by M. & N. Hanhart. Interleaved with blanks throughout. Contemporary half green morocco and green cloth covered boards, spine with raised bands in six compartments, lettered in gilt in the second, the others with a repeat decoration in gilt, marbled endpapers and edges First edition and apparently very rare: "Only 100 copies of the perfect work have been prepared" (note by Trubner & Co. on the wrappers of "The Ibis" for July and October 1862), and Wood and Zimmer record that only 100 copies with plates were published. This is Philip Sclater's catalogue of his personal collection, which was housed in ten small cabinets cross-referenced to the present work: "I began to form a collection of bird-skins after I commenced my residence in Oxford in 1848, being induced to do so by the advice of ... H.E. Strickland. ... My collection at present consists of about 4100 specimens, representing 2170 species of American birds of the Orders Passeres, Fissirostres and Scansores. Of these 386 are type-specimens, being those from which the original descriptions of the species have been taken. In conclusion, I may add that, in selecting specimens for this collection, one of my great objects has been to illustrate the geographical distribution of the species" (Preface). It was this interest in the geographic distribution of birds that led to Sclater proposing zoogeographic regions that are still in use today. Subsequently, Sclater's collection of bird skins were transferred to the British Museum [now the Natural History Museum], beginning in 1886. At around the same time the museum was augmented by the collections of Gould, Salvin and Godman, Hume, and others to become the largest in the world. Sclater was "the founder and editor of The Ibis, the journal of the British Ornithologists' Union, and secretary of the Zoological Society of London from 1860 to 1903. His interest in natural history spread beyond the bounds of the bird family, but some of the birds named after Sclater include: dusky-billed parrotlet (now changed from Forpus sclateri to Forpus modestus); Sclater's monal (Lopophorus sclateri); erect-crested penguin (Eudyptes sclateri); Ecuadorian cacique (Cacicus sclateri); Mexican chickadee (Poecile sclateri) and the bay-vented Cotinga (Doliornis sclateri). Anker 449; Fine Bird Books (1990) p.139 "only 100 copies issued"; Goode Published writings of Philip Lutley Sclater (1896) 8; Nissen IVB 837; Wood p. 557; Zimmer p. 559 (quoting Trubner).

$1850.00

Illustrations of the Birds of California, Texas, Oregon, British and Russian America. Intended to contain descriptions and figures of all North American birds not given by former American authors, and a general synopsis of North American Ornithology
seller photo

Illustrations of the Birds of California, Texas, Oregon, British and Russian America. Intended to contain descriptions and figures of all North American birds not given by former American authors, and a general synopsis of North American Ornithology

By CASSIN, John (1813-1869)

Philadelphia: J.B. Lippincott & Co, 1856. Quarto. (10 3/16 x 6 3/4 inches). 50 hand-coloured lithographs, printed by J.T. Bowen of Philadelphia, 18 after George G. White, 32 drawn on stone by William E. Hitchcock. Scattered minor foxing to the text (the plates generally cleaned), a few plates irregularly trimmed with minor loss at fore-edge. Contemporary half calf and marbled paper covered boards, spine with raised bands in six compartments, red and black morocco lettering pieces in the second and fourth, the others with a repeat decoration in gilt, marbled endpapers, gilt edges The first edition of Cassin's additions to Audubon: an important American colour-plate and ornithological work. Cassin intended his work to supplement that of Audubon. He had originally suggested to Audubon's sons a plan for extending the octavo edition of Audubon's The Birds of America , but difficulty concerning credit on the titlepage sank the scheme, and Cassin proceeded with his own publication. His original intention was to issue a work containing 150 plates but about halfway through the issue of the parts this was reduced to 50 plates. Cassin used the same lithographer as the Audubons, J.T. Bowen of Philadelphia, to produce the beautiful plates of American birds, consisting entirely of western species that Audubon had never observed. Cassin was a trained scientist as well as careful artist and observer, and his work took American ornithology to a new level of technical competence, becoming the first American bird book to use trinomial nomenclature. Anker 92; Bennett p.21; Cowan p.110; Lada-Mocarski 144; McGrath p.85; Nissen IVB 173; Reese Stamped with a National Character 42; Sabin 11369; Zimmer p.124.

$3700.00

Brown Pelican. From "The Birds of America" (Amsterdam Edition)
seller photo

Brown Pelican. From "The Birds of America" (Amsterdam Edition)

By AUDUBON, John James (1785-1851)

Amsterdam and New York: Johnson Reprint Corporation and Theatrum Orbis Terrarum, 1971. Colour-printed lithograph, on fine hand-made paper. Excellent condition. In October 1971, employing the most faithful printing method available, the best materials and the ablest craftsmen of their age, the Amsterdam firm of Theatrum Orbis Terrarum Ltd., in conjunction with the Johnson Reprint Corporation of New York, set out to produce the finest possible limited edition facsimile of the greatest bird book ever printed: the Havell edition of John James Audubon's well-loved "Birds of America". The Curators of the Teyler's Museum in Haarlem, Holland made their copy of the original work available for use as a model. The Museum, founded in 1778, bought their copy through Audubon's son as part of the original subscription in 1839. After long deliberation, the extremely complex but highly accurate process of colour photo-lithography was chosen as the appropriate printing method. The best exponents of this art were the renowned Dutch printing firm of NV Fotolitho Inrichting Drommel at Zandvoort who were willing to undertake the task of printing each plate in up to eight different colours. The original Havell edition was published on hand-made rag paper and the publishers were determined that the paper of their edition should match the original. Unhappy with the commercially available papers, they turned to the traditional paper manufacturers G. Schut & Zonen (founded in 1625), who, using 100% unbleached cotton rags, were able to produce a wove paper of the highest quality, with each sheet bearing a watermark unique to the edition: G. Schut & Zonen [JR monogram] Audubon [OT monogram]. The publishers and their dedicated team completed their task late in 1972 and the results of these labours were affectionately known as the "Amsterdam Audubon." 250 copies were published and sold by subscription, with the plates available bound or unbound. Given all this careful preparation, it is not surprising that the prints have the look and feel of the original Havell edition. John James Audubon was born in Les Cayes, Haiti on 26 April 1785. From 1788 to 1803 he lived in France until he was sent to the United States to manage an estate that his father had bought in Pennsylvania. He returned to France in 1805, but his fascination with the United States had taken root and he returned again in May 1806. He married Lucy Bakewell in 1808 and together they embarked on a difficult period financially that was only to be resolved, through Audubon's unshakable and justified belief in his own abilities, with the publication of his masterpiece in 1827-1838. "The Birds of America" is the single greatest ornithological work ever produced and is the realization of Audubon's dream of traveling throughout the United States recording, natural size, every native bird then known. The 435 double-elephant folio sized plates, printed by the Havells of London, depict some 1,065 different species, the majority drawn from specimens that Audubon himself had captured. The Havell edition was expensive at the time of publication and this has not changed. Possibly the last complete copy which will ever appear on the market sold for a staggering $8,802,500 in a sale in New York in March 2000. Currently, the increasingly rare individual plates from this edition, when they do appear, generally sell for between $5,000 and $175,000 depending on the image. The quality of the Amsterdam Audubon plates is apparent to any discerning collector and it is becoming ever clearer that they offer the most attractive alternative to the Havell edition plates, given the latter's spiraling prices. Cf. Zimmer, p. 22; cf. Bennett, p. 5; cf. Fries, Appendix A; cf. Wood, p. 208; cf. Nissen IVB 51; cf. Sabin 2364; cf. Ripley 13; cf. Tyler, Audubon's Great National Work , 1993, Appendix I.

$2000.00

Livre des differentes espèces d'Oiseaux de la Chine tires du Cabinet du Roy ... [Bound with:] Livre des differentes espèces d'Oiseaux, Fleurs, Plantes, et Trophés de la Chine ... 2.e Partie ... [Bound with:] ... 3.e Partie ... [Bound with] ... 4.e Partie
seller photo

Livre des differentes espèces d'Oiseaux de la Chine tires du Cabinet du Roy ... [Bound with:] Livre des differentes espèces d'Oiseaux, Fleurs, Plantes, et Trophés de la Chine ... 2.e Partie ... [Bound with:] ... 3.e Partie ... [Bound with] ... 4.e Partie

By HUQUIER, Gabriel (1695-1772), engraver; Jean Baptiste OUDRY (1686-1755), after; and others

Paris, 1745. Four parts in one, folio. (24 1/3 x 18 5/8 inches). 60 hand-coloured engraved plates by Huquier after Jean Baptiste Oudry and others (numbered 1-60), on laid paper watermarked 1742, each inlaid into a larger sheet of laid paper within the album at a contemporary date. Caption titles as above in the lower corner on the first plate of each part. Extra-illustrated with a contemporary original watercolour, also on laid paper, of plate 29. Expertly bound to style in period russia, covers elaborately bordered in gilt with a central gilt device comprised of small tools, spine with raised bands in eight compartments, red and black morocco lettering pieces in the second and third, the others with a repeat decoration in gilt, marbled endpapers and edges An extraordinary collection of large lavishly engraved plates with original 18th century hand-colouring of Chinese birds, flowers, vases and objects: the dénoument of French Rococo Chinoiserie. Huquier was among the most prominent French engravers, printsellers and tastemakers of the mid-18th century, designing or reproducing a prolific amount of ornamentation. The present collection of four suites containing sixty hand-coloured engravings of birds, flowers, botanical arrangements and objects presents the best Chinoiserie of the period. The first part is entirely dedicated to Asian birds; of the other three parts, approximately 25 plates depict intricate and colorful floral arrangements, many in elaborate chinoiserie inspired vases; six depict Asian flora with birds in natural settings; and the remaining illustrate Chinese objects including vessels, snuff boxes and other objects d'art. Besides being a talented designer and engraver, Huquier assembled an impressive collection of art, dispersed in three auctions in 1761, 1771 and 1772, including what is believed to be the largest collection of original watercolours by Oudry. An album of watercolours of birds by Oudry (and presumably from Huquier's collection) is now located at Harvard's Fogg Museum, and confirms that the images of birds in the plates present here were engraved by Huquier after Oudry. Besides having a relationship with Oudry, Huquier was known to have engraved Chinoiserie designs after Fraisse, Watteau, Boucher and others, suggesting other artists of the present engravings. However, given Huquier's own artistic talents, it is quite possible that many of the engravings are after his own work. The extra-illustration of a contemporary watercolour of plate 29, though unattributed, may be by Huquier. The strictly contemporary hand colouring of the plates in this album is simply superb. The extreme high quality of the colouring, coupled with the contemporary inlaid presentation of the plates and the original watercolour, suggests that the album was assembled for a collector of note in the mid-18th century. A similar album, also containing sixty plates, sold in the 1772 auction of Huquier's estate (as lot no. 157, selling for 380 livres). In addition, a similar album of the same four parts comprised of 60 hand coloured plates, extra illustrated with 12 original watercolours in the rear, is located at the Institut National d'Histoire de l'Art, Paris. We find no examples of this work selling at auction since the 18th century, Nissen IVB 465; Lewine, p. 248; Cohen, p. 274; Bruand and Hebert, Inventaire du Fonds Français, Graveurs du XVIIIe Siècle , #1953-2012. cf. Mary Morton, editor. Oudry's Painted Menagerie (2007); cf. Hal Opperman, Jean Baptiste Oudry (1977); Susan Miller, "Jean Antoine Fraisse, grave par Huquier" in Metropolian Museum Journal , vol. 31 (1996), pp. 127-130; Y. Bruand, "Un Grand Collectionneur, Marchand et Graveur du XVIIIe Siècle, Gabriel Huquier (1695-1772)," in Gazette des Beaux-Arts (1950), pp. 99-114.

$165000.00

The Natural History of Carolina, Florida, and the Bahama Islands: containing the figures of birds, beasts, fishes, serpents, insects, and plants; particularly, those not hitherto described, or incorrectly figured by former authors, with their descriptions in English and French
seller photo

The Natural History of Carolina, Florida, and the Bahama Islands: containing the figures of birds, beasts, fishes, serpents, insects, and plants; particularly, those not hitherto described, or incorrectly figured by former authors, with their descriptions in English and French

By CATESBY, Mark (1683-1749)

London: Printed for Charles Marsh, Thomas Wilcox and Benjamin Stichall, 1754. 2 volumes, folio. Titles in French and English and printed in red and black, parallel text printed in double columns in French and English. 1 double-page hand-coloured engraved map, 220 hand-coloured etched plates (218 by and after Catesby, most signed with his monogram, plates 61 and 96 in volume II by Georg Dionysius Ehret). With the 4pp. letterpress Catalogue of the Animals and Plants Represented in Catesby's Natural History, from the third edition, here inserted in the rear of the second volume. (Scattered minor foxing). Contemporary russia, covers bordered in gilt, expertly rebacked to style, expert restoration to the board edges and corners, marbled endpapers Provenance: Manchester Library (armorial bookplate) The second edition of the "most famous colorplate book of American plant and animal life ... a fundamental and original work for the study of American species" (Hunt). A beautiful and vastly important work by the founder of American ornithology, this book embodies the most impressive record made during the colonial period of the natural history of an American colony and is the most significant work of American natural history before Audubon. Trained as a botanist, Catesby travelled to Virginia in 1712 and remained there for seven years, sending back to England collections of plants and seeds. With the encouragement of Sir Hans Sloane and others, Catesby returned to America in 1722 to seek materials for his Natural History; he travelled extensively in Carolina, Georgia, Florida, and the Bahamas, sending back further specimens. His preface provides a lengthy account of the development of this work, including his decision to study with Joseph Goupy in order to learn to etch his copper plates himself to ensure accuracy and economy. The end result is encyclopaedic: Catesby provides information not only on the botany and ornithology of the area, but also on its history, climate, geology and anthropology. Catesby writes in the preface of his method of working: "As I was not bred a Painter, I hope some faults in Perspective, and other niceties, may be more readily excused: for I humbly conceive that Plants, and other Things done in a Flat, if an exact manner, may serve the Purpose of Natural History, better in some Measure, than in a mere bold and Painter-like Way. In designing the Plants, I always did them while fresh and just gathered: and the Animals, particularly the Birds, I painted while alive (except a very few) and gave them their Gestures peculiar to every kind of Birds, and where it could be admitted, I have adapted the Birds to those Plants on which they fed, or have any relation to. Fish, which do not retain their colours when out of their Element, I painted at different times, having a succession of them procured while the former lost their colours... Reptiles will live for many months...so that I had no difficulty in painting them while living" (Vol.I, p.vi). The first edition was published in ten parts, with the final part appearing in 1743, plus the twenty plate appendix, which was issued four years later. Work appears to have begun on the present second edition almost immediately, if not simultaneously with the publication of the Appendix in 1747. According to Stafleu & Cowan, the second edition was published between 1748 and 1756. Recent discoveries have suggested that there are multiple issues of the second edition, including early issues that may partly be comprised by sheets from the first edition. The present set includes the first twenty text leaves in their corrected state. Reese, Struggle for North America 16; Cf. Anker 94; cf. Dunthorne 72; cf. Fine Bird Books (1990) p.86; cf. Great Flower Books (1990) p.87; cf Hunt 486 (1st edition); cf. Jackson Bird Etchings p.76; cf. Meisel III, p.341; cf. Nissen BBI 336; cf. Nissen IVB 177; cf. Ripley Yale p.55; Sabin 11508; cf. Stafleu & Cowan TL2 1057; Wood p.281 ('A rare printing'); E.G. Allen 'The History of American Ornithology before Audubon' in Transactions of the American Philosophical Society , new series, vol.41, part 3 (Philadelphia: October 1951); Amy Meyers & Margaret Pritchard Empire's Nature, Mark Catesby's New World Vision (Williamsburg, 1998); Edwin Wolf 2nd, A Flock of Beautiful Birds (Philadelphia, 1977), pp.5-7 (Catesby "was the first to observe and depict North American birds in their natural settings, combining ornithological details with botanic ones"); E. Charles Nelson and David J. Elliott, The Curious Mister Catesby (University of Georgia Press, 2015).

$285000.00

American Ornithology; or, the Natural History of Birds inhabiting the United States, not given by Wilson
seller photo

American Ornithology; or, the Natural History of Birds inhabiting the United States, not given by Wilson

By BONAPARTE, Charles Lucian (1803-1857)

Philadelphia: Samuel Augustus Mitchell [vol I]; Carey, Lea & Carey [vols II & III]; Carey & Lea [vol IV], 1833. Four volumes, small folio (15 x 12 inches [vols. 2 and 4] and 14 1/2 x 11 1/4 inches [vols. 1 and 3]. 27 hand-colored engraved plates by Alexander Lawson (11 after Titian R. Peale, 15 after A. Rider, and 1 after J.J. Audubon and A. Rider). Foxing to the text, particularly in vols. 3 and 4, though the plates clean throughout. Vols. 2 and 4 uncut. Publisher's half red morocco and marbled paper covered boards First edition, first issue of this important American ornithological work, with the plates beautifully hand colored. Bonaparte's important continuation of Wilson's American Ornithology describes 60 birds not in the original work. "A love for the same department of natural science, and a desire to complete the vast enterprise so far advanced by Wilson's labors, has induced us to undertake the present work," Bonaparte writes in the preface, "in order to illustrate what premature death prevented him from accomplishing, as well as the discoveries subsequently made in the feathered tribes of these States." "The work which had been performed by Wilson's hands alone now gave employment to several individuals. Titian R., the fourth son of Charles Wilson Peale, not only collected many of the birds figured while on the Long expedition, which were credited to Thomas Say, who originally described them in footnotes scattered through the report; or in a subsequent private trip to Florida during the winter and spring of 1825, under the patronage of Bonaparte; but also drew the figures engraved for the first, and two plates for the fourth and last volume. A German emigrant by the name of Alexander Rider, of whom little is known beyond that he was a miniature painter in 1813, and a portrait and historical painter in 1818, was responsible for the remainder of the drawings with the exception of the two figures of plate 4 of volume I..." (Frank L. Burns, On Alexander Wilson ). That plate, the Great Crow Blackbird, is notable as being the first book appearance of any engraving after John James Audubon. Perhaps the most influential artist involved with the work, however, was Bonaparte's master engraver Alexander Lawson, arguably the most talented ornithological engraver in America at that time. Three issues of the first edition of Wilson's continuation have been identified. This set is comprised of the rare first issue of vol. 1 (with the Mitchell imprint and containing the first issue of plate 6 in that volume (see Ellis/Mengel) and with first issues of volumes two through four (published by Carey & Lea and printed by William Brown). Carey & Lea later reissued the first volume, with their own imprint, after purchasing the rights to the publication from Mitchell in 1828. The third issue includes volumes reprinted by T.K. and P.G. Collins (with their imprint replacing that of William Brown) for Carey & Lea with unchanged dates on the titles but actually printed in about 1835 after the completion of the final volume. Anker 47; Bennett 16; Coues 1:609; Ellis/Mengel 312a-b; Fine Bird Books (1990) p. 78; Nissen IVB 116; Sabin 6264; Wood 247; Zimmer p.64.

$7500.00

A Monograph of the Pittidae, or, Family of Ant Thrushes
seller photo

A Monograph of the Pittidae, or, Family of Ant Thrushes

By ELLIOT, Daniel Giraud (1835-1915)

New York: D.Appleton & Co, 1863. Folio. (21 7/16 x 13 5/8 inches). 1p. dedication to Philip Lutley Sclater, 1p. list of subscribers. 31 fine hand-coloured lithographic plates, heightened with gum arabic, after Elliot (24), Paul Louis Oudart (4), E. Maubert (1), A.Mesnel (1) and one unsigned, drawn on stone by C. P.Tholey and others, printed and coloured by Bowen & Co. of Philadelphia. Expert repairs at margins of frontispiece plate. Expertly bound to style in half dark green morocco and green cloth covered boards, spine with raised bands in seven compartment, ruled in gilt on either side of each band, lettered in gilt A fine copy of the first edition. A rare and spectacular ornithological work, the first book by Elliot with his own illustrations, and the scarcest of his major monographs. "Elliot was not his own painter, except among the Pittas. Early in his career, in 1863, he had brought out his book on the Pittidae, or Ant-Thrushes with plates of a delightful ... character, after his own drawings" ( Fine Bird Books ). Elliot's chosen illustrator, Paul Louis Oudart, died after completing only 3 or 4 plates, and rather than risk a hurried instruction to another artist, Elliot "felt compelled to turn draughtsman myself" (Preface) and executed all of the other drawings, bar one each by Maubert and Mesnel. The illustrations and indeed the birds themselves represent the pinnacle of Elliot's pictorial work. The Pittidae described are native to Borneo, Nepal, Ceylon, the Philippines, New Guinea, and Cambodia amongst other places. Their plumage is rendered in vibrant shades of blues, greens and reds, and the birds (many of whom are shown feeding their young) are placed against beautifully drawn landscapes. Elliot was also careful to ensure that the flowers and foliage shown in detail with the birds were appropriate for the species shown. When a second edition of this work was issued, most of the plates were redrawn by John Gould's artist, William Hart, and the text was completely rewritten. BM ( NH ) I, p.522; Fine Bird Books (1990), p. 95; Nissen IVB 292; Sabin 22228 (noting that only 200 copies were printed); Wood p.332; Whittell pp.225-226; Zimmer p.208.

$22000.00

Le Perroquet Lori-unicolor [Lory (Lorius sp.)]
seller photo

Le Perroquet Lori-unicolor [Lory (Lorius sp.)]

By BARRABAND, Jacques (1767/8-1809)

Paris, 1801. Colour-printed stipple engraving. Very good condition. Jacques Barraband was the finest ornithological artist of his time. The son of a weaver at the Aubusson Factory, he is first mentioned as a pupil of Joseph Malaine (1745-1809), the eminent flower painter, and is known to have worked for both the Gobelin Factory and the porcelain factory of Sèvres. His most important work was undoubtedly the 300 or so drawings that he produced for François Levaillant's three great ornithological monographs, the greatest of which was the Histoire Naturelle des Perroquets (1801-1805).

$1250.00

A Monograph of the Jacamars and the Puff-Birds, or Families Galbulidae and Bucconidae
seller photo

A Monograph of the Jacamars and the Puff-Birds, or Families Galbulidae and Bucconidae

By SCLATER, Philip Lutley (1829-1913)

London: printed by Taylor & Francis, published for the Author by R.H. Porter, 1882. 7 parts in one volume, royal quarto. (12 3/8 x 9 7/8 inches). 1p. list of subscribers, letterpress title with wood-engraved vignette. 55 hand-coloured lithographic plates by John Gerrard Keulemans, printed by Hanhart. With the original parts front wrappers bound in the rear. Early red half morocco and red pebble-grained cloth-covered boards, spine in six compartments with raised bands, ruled in gilt on either side of each band, lettered in gilt in the second and fourth compartments First edition of this beautifully-illustrated monograph, limited to 250 copies, with plates by Keulemans: "the major bird book illustrator" of his time (Jackson). John Gerrard Keulemans (1842-1912) is described by Christine Jackson as "the major bird book illustrator for 30 years at the end of the 19th century" ( Dictionary of Bird Artists of the World , 1999, p.314), and an artist who "worked to a consistently high standard." This is certainly true of the excellent illustrations in the present work. Every species is carefully depicted against a naturalistic background, with the plumage precisely indicated and beautifully coloured. Sclater notes in the preface that "The Jacamars and Puff-birds formed the subject of some of my earliest studies in Ornithology. Of the former of these families I published a Synopsis in 1852, of the latter in 1856. Since those dates I have not failed to add to my series of examples of both groups whenever the opportunity has presented itself. Assisted by the additional materials thus acquired, and by the excellent collection of the birds... in the cabinets of my friends Salvin and Godman ... it has been a great pleasure to me to go over former ground and ... to give a complete account of what is as yet known of the Jacamars and Puff-birds." The work was issued in seven parts by Sclater, each part priced at one guinea. The size of the work was intended to be uniform with Dresser's Birds of Europe, Sharpe's Kingfishers, Marshall's Barbets , and Shelley's Sun-birds. The Jacamars and Puffbirds are insect-eating birds, natives of the Caribbean, central and south America, and are apparently related to the trogons and woodpeckers. They inhabit the dense tropical forest, and can usually be seen sitting motionless on trees from which they fly out to catch insects on the wing, then return to crack them on a branch before eating them. Anker 451; Fine Bird Books (1990), p.106; Nissen IVB 840; Wood, p.558; Zimmer, p.561.

$7500.00

Next >