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Waterfowl of North America

By DUCKS UNLIMITED

Winnepeg: Ducks Unlimited Canada, 1987. Oblong folio. 44 color plates, each pencil signed by the artist. Publisher's brown leather binding within publishers clamshell box. Limited to numbered 1250 copies, with each print signed by the artist. Published to celebrate the fiftieth anniversary of Ducks Unlimited, the work includes images after Michael Dumas, Larry Toschik, Herb Booth, James Killen, Peter Scott, John WIlson, Donald Curley, Harry C. Adamson, Keith Shackleton and others. Each print is pencil signed by the artist, as issued.

$1750.00

A Monograph of the Pittidae, or, Family of Ant Thrushes
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A Monograph of the Pittidae, or, Family of Ant Thrushes

By ELLIOT, Daniel Giraud (1835-1915)

New York: D.Appleton & Co, 1863. Folio. (21 7/16 x 13 5/8 inches). 1p. dedication to Philip Lutley Sclater, 1p. list of subscribers. 31 fine hand-coloured lithographic plates, heightened with gum arabic, after Elliot (24), Paul Louis Oudart (4), E. Maubert (1), A.Mesnel (1) and one unsigned, drawn on stone by C. P.Tholey and others, printed and coloured by Bowen & Co. of Philadelphia. Expert repairs at margins of frontispiece plate. Expertly bound to style in half dark green morocco and green cloth covered boards, spine with raised bands in seven compartment, ruled in gilt on either side of each band, lettered in gilt A fine copy of the first edition. A rare and spectacular ornithological work, the first book by Elliot with his own illustrations, and the scarcest of his major monographs. "Elliot was not his own painter, except among the Pittas. Early in his career, in 1863, he had brought out his book on the Pittidae, or Ant-Thrushes with plates of a delightful ... character, after his own drawings" ( Fine Bird Books ). Elliot's chosen illustrator, Paul Louis Oudart, died after completing only 3 or 4 plates, and rather than risk a hurried instruction to another artist, Elliot "felt compelled to turn draughtsman myself" (Preface) and executed all of the other drawings, bar one each by Maubert and Mesnel. The illustrations and indeed the birds themselves represent the pinnacle of Elliot's pictorial work. The Pittidae described are native to Borneo, Nepal, Ceylon, the Philippines, New Guinea, and Cambodia amongst other places. Their plumage is rendered in vibrant shades of blues, greens and reds, and the birds (many of whom are shown feeding their young) are placed against beautifully drawn landscapes. Elliot was also careful to ensure that the flowers and foliage shown in detail with the birds were appropriate for the species shown. When a second edition of this work was issued, most of the plates were redrawn by John Gould's artist, William Hart, and the text was completely rewritten. BM ( NH ) I, p.522; Fine Bird Books (1990), p. 95; Nissen IVB 292; Sabin 22228 (noting that only 200 copies were printed); Wood p.332; Whittell pp.225-226; Zimmer p.208.

$22000.00

Svenska Foglarna
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Svenska Foglarna

By SUNDEVALL, Carl Jacob (1801-1875)

Stockholm: J. & A. Riis (text vol. 1); D & G. Beijer (text vols. 2-4), 1886. 5 volumes, oblong quarto. (9 x 12 3/8 inches). Text in two columns. Plate volume with lithographed title, engraved dedication leaf and 84 hand-coloured lithographed plates, mostly after Peter Akerlund. Contemporary half calf and marbled paper covered boards Scarce set complete with plates and all text volumes: the definitive 19th century work on birds observed in Sweden. Complete with the rare additional text volumes (i.e. vols. 2-4) published by Kinberg after Sundervall's death. "An interesting and systematic account of 238 species ... The plates are well made and greatly assist the identification of varieties ... A complete set is rare" (Wood). ''The plates are most attractive due to the superb quality of their colouring and the careful execution of the drawing'' (Jackson). Nissen IVB 902; Wood p.587; Zimmer p.609; Anker 490; Fine Bird Books, p.110.

$950.00

Le Perroquet Lori-unicolor [Lory (Lorius sp.)]
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Le Perroquet Lori-unicolor [Lory (Lorius sp.)]

By BARRABAND, Jacques (1767/8-1809)

Paris, 1801. Colour-printed stipple engraving. Very good condition. Jacques Barraband was the finest ornithological artist of his time. The son of a weaver at the Aubusson Factory, he is first mentioned as a pupil of Joseph Malaine (1745-1809), the eminent flower painter, and is known to have worked for both the Gobelin Factory and the porcelain factory of Sèvres. His most important work was undoubtedly the 300 or so drawings that he produced for François Levaillant's three great ornithological monographs, the greatest of which was the Histoire Naturelle des Perroquets (1801-1805).

$1250.00

A Monograph of the Jacamars and the Puff-Birds, or Families Galbulidae and Bucconidae
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A Monograph of the Jacamars and the Puff-Birds, or Families Galbulidae and Bucconidae

By SCLATER, Philip Lutley (1829-1913)

London: printed by Taylor & Francis, published for the Author by R.H. Porter, 1882. 7 parts in one volume, royal quarto. (12 3/8 x 9 7/8 inches). 1p. list of subscribers, letterpress title with wood-engraved vignette. 55 hand-coloured lithographic plates by John Gerrard Keulemans, printed by Hanhart. With the original parts front wrappers bound in the rear. Early red half morocco and red pebble-grained cloth-covered boards, spine in six compartments with raised bands, ruled in gilt on either side of each band, lettered in gilt in the second and fourth compartments First edition of this beautifully-illustrated monograph, limited to 250 copies, with plates by Keulemans: "the major bird book illustrator" of his time (Jackson). John Gerrard Keulemans (1842-1912) is described by Christine Jackson as "the major bird book illustrator for 30 years at the end of the 19th century" ( Dictionary of Bird Artists of the World , 1999, p.314), and an artist who "worked to a consistently high standard." This is certainly true of the excellent illustrations in the present work. Every species is carefully depicted against a naturalistic background, with the plumage precisely indicated and beautifully coloured. Sclater notes in the preface that "The Jacamars and Puff-birds formed the subject of some of my earliest studies in Ornithology. Of the former of these families I published a Synopsis in 1852, of the latter in 1856. Since those dates I have not failed to add to my series of examples of both groups whenever the opportunity has presented itself. Assisted by the additional materials thus acquired, and by the excellent collection of the birds... in the cabinets of my friends Salvin and Godman ... it has been a great pleasure to me to go over former ground and ... to give a complete account of what is as yet known of the Jacamars and Puff-birds." The work was issued in seven parts by Sclater, each part priced at one guinea. The size of the work was intended to be uniform with Dresser's Birds of Europe, Sharpe's Kingfishers, Marshall's Barbets , and Shelley's Sun-birds. The Jacamars and Puffbirds are insect-eating birds, natives of the Caribbean, central and south America, and are apparently related to the trogons and woodpeckers. They inhabit the dense tropical forest, and can usually be seen sitting motionless on trees from which they fly out to catch insects on the wing, then return to crack them on a branch before eating them. Anker 451; Fine Bird Books (1990), p.106; Nissen IVB 840; Wood, p.558; Zimmer, p.561.

$7500.00

Ornithological Biography, or an account of the habits of the birds of the United States of America; accompanied by descriptions of the objects represented in the work entitled The Birds of America, and interspersed with delineations of American scenery and manners
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Ornithological Biography, or an account of the habits of the birds of the United States of America; accompanied by descriptions of the objects represented in the work entitled The Birds of America, and interspersed with delineations of American scenery and manners

By AUDUBON, John James (1785-1851)

Edinburgh & London: Printed by Neill & Co. (Edinburgh) for Adam & Charles Black (Edinburgh) and R. Havell Jun., and Longman, Rees, Brown and Green (London), and various others, 1839. 5 volumes, octavo. (10 5/8 x 6 1/2 inches). Half-titles, 5pp. list of subscribers at the end of vol.V, numerous woodcut text illustrations. Original publisher's light red cloth, expertly rebacked to style, with original printed paper title labels to vols. I, II, IV and V laid onto spines, vol.III with facsimile label, some expert repairs to other labels, uncut, each volume contained within a modern morocco-backed cloth box Provenance: Robert Havell (presentation inscription) First edition, a remarkable association copy, inscribed by Audubon to his engraver and friend, Robert Havell, Junior. This presentation copy is a fitting monument to one of the great partnerships in the history of ornithological art. It is difficult to overemphasise the importance of the Havells, junior and senior, to the success of Audubon's great work. Christine Jackson, writing of Robert Havell, Jnr., notes that he "was a very fine craftsman, and a substantial contributor to the success of Audubon's magnificent atlas. As the pressure of work increased on Audubon, he relied more on Havell to interpret his designs and complete his compositions by painting in the backgrounds, combining several drawings on to a single plate and sometimes adding finishing details" ( Dictionary of Bird Artists , p.277). Audubon had initially entrusted the engraving to the Edinburgh printer W. H. Lizars, but, following a strike in Lizars workshop after only a handful of plates had been printed, Audubon began to look for alternatives, and by September, 1827 was able to note that the work had been moved to the London shop of Robert Havell "because of the difficulty of finding colorers [in Edinburgh] made [the work] come too slowly and also because I have it done better and cheaper in London" (quoted by Fries, p. 23). The Audubon/Havell partnership almost fell at the first hurdle, in that Havell father and son had been estranged since 1825. But Audubon was inadvertently the agent of reconciliation: approached by Audubon, Havell Sr. felt he was too old to assume the broad mantle of responsibility for this monumental work but strove to find a young engraver with the qualifications and stamina to work under his and Audubon's instruction. Family accounts indicate that the elder Havell consulted his friend the art dealer and publisher, Colnaghi, who showed him an unfinished proof of a landscape by one of his engravers. Impressed with the work, Havell asked to be introduced to the engraver. "Then," said Colnaghi, "send for your son." "The singular incident of the anonymous engraver's proof brought about a reconciliation between father and son, who then entered upon a successful business partnership, henceforth known as Robert Havell and Son" (Fries, p. 25). Havell Sr. printed and coloured many of the plates of the Birds of America until his death in 1832, and the work was subsequently seen through to completion in 1838 by Havell Jr., who styled himself 'R. Havell, Esq.', after his father's death. The effect of working with Audubon on Havell can perhaps best be judged by the fact that in September 1839 Havell and his family emigrated to the United States, settling about twenty miles up the Hudson at Tarrytown, close to his old and appreciative friend. Havell went on to gain success as a landscape painter, specialising in views on the Hudson. He eventually died in Tarrytown in 1878. The genesis of the present work is interesting: as early as November 1826, Audubon had begun thinking about the text which should accompany his engraved illustrations of birds. He noted in his journal: 'I shall publish the letterpress in a separate book, at the same time with the illustrations and shall accompany the descriptions of the birds with many anecdotes and accounts of localities connected with the birds themselves ...' (M.R. Audubon Audubon and his journals 1897, vol.I, p.163). Audubon had taken the decision to publish the letterpress separately (and give it free to the subscribers to the plate volumes) because, according to British copyright law, had the letterpress accompanied the engravings, Audubon would have been obliged to deposit a copy of the work in each of the nine 'copyright libraries' in the United Kingdom. This would have placed a strain on the economics of the production of the book. Work on the text did not begin in earnest until the end of 1830, just as Havell was nearing the completion of the engraving of the first 100 drawings. Between 1831 and 1837 Audubon and his family made three trips to America. Audubon was back in London between 1837 and 1839, where he completed the descriptions of the last two volumes of the Ornithological Biography . On 20 November 1838, Audubon wrote to Bachman: "My fourth Vol. is finished and in 10 days I will have 200 copies of it at London where I hope you will be and receive several Copies to take over with you, for yourselves and others as then directed" (quoted by Fries, p. 111). This was probably the moment when Audubon inscribed the fourth volume of the present set to Havell. In addition to the inscription, four other examples of Audubon's hand are pasted onto the title pages of each off the other four volumes: these are evidently taken from envelopes or letter-covers addressed by Audubon to his collaborator and are a reminder of the constant stream of correspondence concerning the production of the Birds of America that would have flowed between the great ornithological artist and his equally-gifted engraver. Waldemar H. Fries The Double Elephant Folio The Story of Audubon's Birds of America (Chicago, 1973).

$27500.00

Catalogues of the birds, shells, and some of the more rare plants, of Dorsetshire. From the new and enlarged edition of Mr. Hutchins's history of that county ... With additions; and a brief memoir of the author
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Catalogues of the birds, shells, and some of the more rare plants, of Dorsetshire. From the new and enlarged edition of Mr. Hutchins's history of that county ... With additions; and a brief memoir of the author

By PULTENEY, Richard (1730-1801); and Thomas RACKETT (1757-1841)

[London: Printed by and for J. Nichols, Son, and Bentley, 1813. Folio. (19 1/2 x 12 inches). Text in two columns. iv, 110pp. Engraved portrait, 24 engraved plates on 13 sheets. Uncut. Some foxing. Later cloth-backed grey paper boards. Large-paper issue of the first illustrated edition of a rare catalogue of British birds, plants and shells. Richard Pulteney received his doctorate in medicine from the University of Edinburgh in 1764, before serving as the personal physician to the Earl of Bath. Following the Earl's death, he resided and practiced in Blandford, Dorset. Besides membership in a host of medical societies, Pulteney was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society, as well as a Fellow of the Linnean Society. Indeed, he was an early promoter of Linnaean taxonomy, and authored the first English biography of Linnaeus in 1781. His cabinet of specimens, noted particularly for its shells, was donated to the Linnean Society following his death in 1801. The first edition of 1799 was privately-published by Pulteney with few copies printed. An inscription in an extant copy by the editor of this new edition reveals that copies of the first edition were further destroyed by fire: "The first Impression of Dr. Pulteney's Catalogues was printed in 1801 [i.e. 1799], but never published, the whole having been destroyed by the fire, at Mr. Nichols's printing office [in 1808]. I have been enabled to make considerable additions in this second impression, from communication by various scientific friends, and from my own obervations." Rackett's revised edition was the first to be illustrated, containing a portrait of Pulteney, a plate depicting 17 shells titled Melbury Fossils (engraved by J. Cary after Mary Foster), and 23 engraved plates of shells on 12 sheets. The plates numbered I-XXIII are new engravings of those by De Costa in his Historia Naturalis Testaeorum Britanniae, with several additions, depicting over 200 species. The present copy is a very rare large-paper issue, printed on wove paper (the 1799 and regular issue of 1813 being on laid paper), with a variant title without imprint. This large-paper issue is not recorded by the usual bibliographies. BM(NH) IV:p. 1622; Pritzel 7367; Nissen, ZBI 3250.

$3500.00

The Magazine of Natural History, and Journal of Zoology, Botany, Mineralogy, Geology, and Meteorology ... [New Series, Vols. 1-4]
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The Magazine of Natural History, and Journal of Zoology, Botany, Mineralogy, Geology, and Meteorology ... [New Series, Vols. 1-4]

By CHARLESWORTH, Edward (1813-1893), editor

London: Longman, Orme, Brown, Green, and Longmans, 1840. 4 volumes, 8vo. 19 engraved plates (one double-page). Publisher's green cloth, covers stamped in blind A complete run of Charlesworth's continuation of Loudon's Magazine of Natural History. Volume 4 includes an essay (with an engraved plate) by Waterhouse concerning two Carabideous insects collected by Charles Darwin in South America during the Beagle voyage. Also of Darwin interest is a review of the Zoology of the Beagle in vol. 3. This complete run of the new series includes submissions by many of the most notable natural historians of the day and include a number of submissions concerning the flora and fauna of Australia.

$1500.00

American Flamingo
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American Flamingo

By AUDUBON, John James (1785-1851)

Leipzig: Ariel Press, 1972. An exceptional and scarce copy of a print made for but not used in the beautifully printed and richly coloured "Leipzig" edition of Audubon's Birds American Flamingo is one of the most desirable plates in the Birds of America, Audubon's masterpiece. This stunning reproduction issue was made using a now antiquated printing technique called collotype which yields quite rich, oil paint-type colours. The Leipzig edition of Audubon's Birds was produced in the early 1970's. The plan was to reproduce 40 plates: 20 vertical and 20 horizontal from Audubon's work of which 500 would be bound in two vol;umes and 500 would be sold loose. Not all the plates produced were used however including this marvellous rendition of the Flamingo, one of the most popular and evocative of all Audubon's Birds. It is consequently quite rare.

$1500.00

Six Full Color Prints Humming Birds. A Portfolio of Six Magnificent Color Prints..
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Six Full Color Prints Humming Birds. A Portfolio of Six Magnificent Color Prints..

By GOULD, John

New York: I. B. Fischer, 1946. Six photoreproductions: 20 x 16 inches each in printed wrapper. The six hummingbirds are: Heliodoxa Jacula, Hylonympha Macrocerca, Thalurania Refulgens, Petasophora Iolata, Heliothrix Purpureiceps, Glaucis Fraseri. "A portfolio of six magnificent color prints reproduced with life-like fidelity to the rare originals by the famous 19th century ornithologist-artist, John Gould. Included are beautiful studies of the Great Forked Tail Humming-bird, Fraser's Barbed Throat, The Violet-Ear, Venezuelan Wood-Nymph, and Purple-Crowned Fairy..." (from the Port Folio).

$500.00

[Pair of Original Watercolors featuring the Buffle-Headed Duck and the King Eider Duck]
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[Pair of Original Watercolors featuring the Buffle-Headed Duck and the King Eider Duck]

By [STONE, SARAH, attributed]

[London, 1790. Two watercolors, each on laid paper, each approximately 9¾ x 13¾ inches. Matted and framed. Two original watercolors by Sarah Stone of American species of ducks. A splendid pair of original watercolors featuring ducks by Sarah Smith (née Stone), a prolific painter of natural history subjects in London between 1777 and 1806. Stone worked exclusively for Sir Ashton Lever, documenting Lever's vast private collection of ornithological, zoological, and ethnographical specimens. Stone's work is admired today for the delicacy of the brushwork, a deft touch with color, and the requisite skill necessary to tackle such a diverse range of subject matter. Of the various subjects which Stone saw fit to translate to canvas, ornithological subjects were her favorite, and constitute the majority of her known work. Her earliest studies of birds date from 1777, when she was only seventeen years old. At the time, she concentrated her efforts on the sole subject at hand, only later adding backgrounds and other life subjects into her paintings. Stone also favored sized paper, an uncommon practice at this time in British painting, and used exceedingly fine brush strokes, with brushes used for the lightest feathers likely containing only one or two hairs. Though unsigned and undated, it is likely that the current examples emanate from this early period of Stone's work, since the ducks are featured by themselves, and on sized, laid paper, and exhibit Stone's fine brushwork. In addition, the contemporary ink annotations along the top edge are in the same hand, though not Stone's hand, as other known ornithological examples of her work dated before 1790. Whomever they belong to, the contemporary notations on Stone's work contain important information about each subject, including the name of each duck, in this case the "Buffel-headed Duck" and the male "King Duck." Following the name of each duck is a citation corresponding to John Latham's General Synopsis , published between 1781 and 1785. For example, the Buffle-headed duck carries the annotation "La. Syn. 6. p.533" which corresponds to Latham, Synopsis , volume six, page 533. A similar notation is found along the top edge of the King Eider duck. This is a practice peculiar to known examples of Stone's birds, since she and Latham were working from some of the same specimens in the Leverian Museum. Further, Latham specifies in his text for the General Synopsis that he used specimens from both his own extensive collection and that of his specimen-collecting rival, Ashton Lever. Each painting also displays an annotation in Latin along the top right edge, corresponding to the subject's Linnaean classification. Interestingly, in 1781, Lever acquired thousands of natural history specimens from Captain Cook's third voyage. It is possible that these two paintings represent ducks collected by Cook's crew on the Northwest Coast of America. "During the late 1770s and throughout the 1780s, Sarah painted at Ashton Lever's museum (or the Leverian Museum, as it came to be called) in Leicester House, Leicester Square, London. She may have asked permission to draw some object from this extraordinary collection of natural history specimens, ethnographical artefacts and other curiosities, and so came to the notice of their owner. Ashton Lever soon commissioned her to record the outstanding articles, both zoological and ethnographical, in his collection. Sarah signed her watercolors, and dated some of them, but the signed and dated watercolors are in the minority" - Jackson. Indeed, Lever held a high opinion of Stone's work, commenting in an advertisement for an exhibition of over 1,000 of Stone's watercolors at his museum in 1784 that Stone had "succeeded in the effort beyond all imagination." Both of these paintings come from Credit Suisse's Americana Collection and were previously held by the Wall Street investment firm of Donaldson, Lufkin & Jenrette (acquired by Credit Suisse in August 2000). The paintings were likely acquired by Richard Jenrette at Sotheby Parke- Bernet Galleries in New York in April 1968, where Stone paintings of a Bufflehead and a King Eider were offered. In that sale, the King Eider duck achieved $350 by itself. A stunning pair of paintings from an artist whose place of importance in the history of 18th-century ornithological studies is only beginning to be realized. Jackson, Christine E. Sarah Stone. Natural Curiosities from the New Worlds . (London: Merrell Holberton and the Natural History Museum, London, 1998), pp.9-36;138.

$18500.00

Illustrations of the Birds of California, Texas, Oregon, British and Russian America. Intended to contain descriptions and figures of all North American birds not given by former American authors, and a general synopsis of North American Ornithology
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Illustrations of the Birds of California, Texas, Oregon, British and Russian America. Intended to contain descriptions and figures of all North American birds not given by former American authors, and a general synopsis of North American Ornithology

By CASSIN, John (1813-1869)

Philadelphia: J.B. Lippincott & Co, 1856. Quarto. (10 1/4 x 6 7/8). 50 hand-coloured lithographs, printed by J.T. Bowen of Philadelphia, 18 after George G. White, 32 drawn on stone by William E. Hitchcock. Light dampstaining in the rear. Contemporary red morocco backed marbled paper covered boards, spine with raised bands in five compartments, lettered in gilt and panelled in gilt and blind, marbled endpapers The first edition of Cassin's additions to Audubon: an important American colour-plate and ornithological work. Cassin intended his work to supplement that of Audubon. He had originally suggested to Audubon's sons a plan for extending the octavo edition of Audubon's The Birds of America , but difficulty concerning credit on the titlepage sank the scheme, and Cassin proceeded with his own publication. His original intention was to issue a work containing 150 plates but about halfway through the issue of the parts this was reduced to 50 plates. Cassin used the same lithographer as the Audubons, J.T. Bowen of Philadelphia, to produce the beautiful plates of American birds, consisting entirely of western species that Audubon had never observed. Cassin was a trained scientist as well as careful artist and observer, and his work took American ornithology to a new level of technical competence, becoming the first American bird book to use trinomial nomenclature. Anker 92; Bennett p.21; Cowan p.110; Lada-Mocarski 144; McGrath p.85; Nissen IVB 173; Reese Stamped with a National Character 42; Sabin 11369; Zimmer p.124.

$3500.00

The New and Heretofore Unfigured Species of the Birds of North America
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The New and Heretofore Unfigured Species of the Birds of North America

By ELLIOT, Daniel Giraud (1835-1915)

New York: Published by the Author, 1869. 2 volumes, large folio. (23 3/16 x 18 1/8 inches). 1p. list of 71 subscribers. 73 hand-coloured lithographic plates (including the additional "Parus occidentalis" plate bound between plates I and II in vol.I; 1 plate by and after Elliot and Joseph Wolf, printed by D. McClellan & Brothers of New York; 72 printed and coloured by Bowen & Co. of Philadelphia, after Elliot [55], Joseph Wolf [15] or Edwin Sheppard [2], drawn on stone by Ch. P. Tholey (11), 'M.P.' (14), 'H.J.S.' (3) or 'L.H.' (1) and others), 21 wood-engraved vignette illustrations, on india paper mounted, by W.J. Linton after Edwin Sheppard. Contemporary 19th-century green half morocco over green cloth-covered boards, spines lettered in gilt, marbled endpapers, top edge gilt A spectacular work with very fine generally life-size hand-coloured lithographs of species not previously pictured by either Alexander Wilson or John James Audubon, and particularly on birds of the American West, here with an additional plate that is not recorded by the standard bibliographies. Elliot describes his aims in the preface: "Since the time of Wilson and Audubon, no work has been published upon American Ornithology, containing life-size representations of the various species that have been discovered since the labors of those great men were finished. The valuable productions of Cassin, as well as the revised edition of the ninth volume of the Pacific Rail Road Report, the joint labor of Messrs. Baird, Cassin and Lawrence had indeed appeared ... but no attempt had been made to continue the works of the first great American naturalists in a similar manner ... It was, therefore, with the desire to contribute ... towards the elucidation of the comparatively little known species of the Birds of North America, their habits and economy, as well as to render their forms familiar so far as life-size representation of them might serve to do, that I undertook the present publication." Over half of the plates in the work are devoted to birds of the American west, including California, Arizona, New Mexico, Texas and the Rocky Mountains, with many of the remaining depicting birds of the Alaskan and Arctic regions. The specimens pictured by Elliot were derived from a number of sources, but included birds brought back from government-sponsored overland expeditions to the West, as well as from private sources such as John Xantus de Vesey. The plates for Elliot's work (with the exception of plate 17 in volume II) were executed by Bowen of Philadelphia, the same lithographer as in Cassin's continuation of Audubon. The project, however, would prove the last for the noted firm, as it closed down shortly after the present work was completed. The plates are taken from originals by Elliot and one of the greatest ornithological artists working in the second half of the nineteenth century: Joseph Wolf. In particular, Wolf's image of the Iceland Falcon (the second plate in volume II) must rank as one of the great bird portraits of all time, and is a worthy successor to the images in Audubon's own masterpiece. The story behind the additional plate is perplexing and illusive. Auction records show that copies with an additional plate have been sold at auction nine times in the past thirty years. These nine appearances represent at least three different copies of the book and possibly as many as eight, so the presence of the 73rd plate in the present copy is not unique. In the text (which does not call for a plate) Elliot notes that the bird which the additional plate pictures ("Parus Occidentalis") it is not a new species at all, but a mis-identified Black-capped Chickadee ("Parus Atricapillus"). If this conclusion was reached by Elliot at a late stage in the book's production then he could have been in the position of having a supply of the plates completed, but with no reason to include them in a book on birds that had not been pictured before. Strangely, none of the standard bibliographies mention the existence of this additional plate. Anker 129; Bennett, p.39; Fine Bird Books (1990) p.95; Nissen IVB 294; Reese Stamped with a National Character 44; Sabin 22227; Wood p.331; Zimmer p. 205.

$36000.00

Catalogue of a collection of American Birds belonging to Philip Lutley Sclater
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Catalogue of a collection of American Birds belonging to Philip Lutley Sclater

By SCLATER, Philip Lutley (1829-1913)

London: N. Trubner & Co, 1862. 8vo. Letterpress title with ornithological wood-engraved vignette by Pearson. 20 hand-coloured lithographed plates by and after John Jennens, printed by M. & N. Hanhart. Some plates trimmed. Modern calf backed marbled paper boards First edition and apparently very rare: "Only 100 copies of the perfect work have been prepared" (note by Trubner & Co. on the wrappers of "The Ibis" for July and October 1862), and Wood and Zimmer record that only 100 copies with plates were published. This is Philip Sclater's catalogue of his personal collection, which was housed in ten small cabinets cross-referenced to the present work: "I began to form a collection of bird-skins after I commenced my residence in Oxford in 1848, being induced to do so by the advice of ... H.E. Strickland. ... My collection at present consists of about 4100 specimens, representing 2170 species of American birds of the Orders Passeres, Fissirostres and Scansores. Of these 386 are type-specimens, being those from which the original descriptions of the species have been taken. In conclusion, I may add that, in selecting specimens for this collection, one of my great objects has been to illustrate the geographical distribution of the species" (Preface). It was this interest in the geographic distribution of birds that led to Sclater proposing zoogeographic regions that are still in use today. Subsequently, Sclater's collection of bird skins were transferred to the British Museum [now the Natural History Museum], beginning in 1886. At around the same time the museum was augmented by the collections of Gould, Salvin and Godman, Hume, and others to become the largest in the world. Sclater was "the founder and editor of The Ibis, the journal of the British Ornithologists' Union, and secretary of the Zoological Society of London from 1860 to 1903. His interest in natural history spread beyond the bounds of the bird family, but some of the birds named after Sclater include: dusky-billed parrotlet (now changed from Forpus sclateri to Forpus modestus); Sclater's monal (Lopophorus sclateri); erect-crested penguin (Eudyptes sclateri); Ecuadorian cacique (Cacicus sclateri); Mexican chickadee (Poecile sclateri) and the bay-vented Cotinga (Doliornis sclateri). Anker 449; Fine Bird Books (1990) p.139 "only 100 copies issued"; Goode Published writings of Philip Lutley Sclater (1896) 8; Nissen IVB 837; Wood p. 557; Zimmer p. 559 (quoting Trubner).

$1850.00

Ramphastos osculans. Osculant Toucan. [Osculated Toucan (Ramphastos osculans)]
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Ramphastos osculans. Osculant Toucan. [Osculated Toucan (Ramphastos osculans)]

By GOULD, John (1804-1881)

[London: by the Author, 1835. Hand-coloured lithograph by John and Elizabeth Gould, printed by C.Hullmandel. Wove paper. A fine image from the first edition of John Gould's 'A Monograph of the Ramphastidae, or Family of Toucans' The toucan family is limited to Mexico, Central and South America and some West Indian islands. The first time that any member of the family was described was by Gonzalo Fernandez de Oviedo y Valdes in his "de la natural hystoria de las Indias" (Toledo, 1526, chapter 42), in 1555 Pierre Belon included an illustration of its beak in his "L'Histoire de la nature des oyseaux" (Paris, 1555, p.184). Andre Thevet first used the name 'Toucan' with a long description, and a woodcut of a whole bird, in his "Singularitez de la France" (Paris, 1555, pp.88-90). The Latin name "Burhynchus" or "Ramphestes" (in reference to the size of the beak) was suggested by Conrad Gesner ("Icones Avium", 1560, p.130), and Linnaeus later adopted Aldrovandus' corrupted form of the latter ("Ramphastos") which is how the family was still recognized at the time of the publication of the present image. The present image is from the first edition of Gould's work, published in 1833-1835, which represented the first concerted attempt to produce a monograph on the family. A second expanded edition was published between 1852 and 1854. Gould considered this to be completely separate work as the plates were all re-drawn and the text re-written. Cf. Anker 170; cf. Fine Bird Books (1990), p. 101; cf. Nissen IVB 378; cf. Sauer 3; cf. Wood p. 364; cf. Zimmer p. 252.

$3500.00

The Ornithology of Francis Willughby ... In three books. Wherein all the birds hitherto known ... are accurately described. Translated into English, with many additions. To which are added three considerable discourses, I. Of the art of fowling ... II. Of the ordering of singing birds. III. Of falconry. By John Ray
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The Ornithology of Francis Willughby ... In three books. Wherein all the birds hitherto known ... are accurately described. Translated into English, with many additions. To which are added three considerable discourses, I. Of the art of fowling ... II. Of the ordering of singing birds. III. Of falconry. By John Ray

By WILLUGHBY, Francis (1635-1672); and John RAY

London: John Martyn, 1678. 3 parts in one volume, folio. Title printed in red & black. 80 engraved plates (2 unnumbered, plus plates numbered 1-78), 2 letterpress tables. Expertly bound to style in half eighteenth century russia and marbled paper covered boards First edition in English of "one of the most important treatises on ornithology of all time, being the first systematic classification of the birds of the world" (Wood). John Ray and his pupil and friend Francis Willughby toured Europe gathering material for their planned complete classification of the vegetable and animal kingdoms. After Willughby's early death in 1672 Ray took over his notes, and having edited the incomplete manuscript and added his own observations published his friend's work in 1676 as Francisci Willughbeii ornithologiae libri tres; totum opus recognovit, digressit, supplevit Joannes Raius . The present work, a translation by Ray, was published two years later and includes three more plates than the Latin edition, and an expanded text including three additional sections by Ray on fowling, falconry and song-birds. Anker 532; BM (NH) V, p.2331; Keynes Ray 39; Nissen IVB 991; Wood p.629; Wing W-2879; Zimmer 677.

$6000.00

A Monograph of the Pheasants
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A Monograph of the Pheasants

By BEEBE, William Charles (1877-1962)

London: published under the auspices of the New York Zoological Society by Witherby and Co, 1927. 4 volumes, folio. (15 15/16 x 11 3/4 inches). Titles in red and black, 90 coloured lithograph or collotype plates, after A. Thorburn, G.E. Lodge, H. Gronvold, L.A. Fuertes, Chas. R. Knight, H. Jones, and E. Megargee, 88 photogravure plates (many with 2 images) from photographs by Beebe and others, 20 distribution maps printed in red and black by Stanford's, the chromolithographs and photogravures with captioned tissue-guards. Publisher's maroon cloth, upper covers and spines lettered in gilt, top edge gilt First edition of perhaps the greatest ornithological work of the last century, "notable not only for its beauty and the wealth of information it contains, but also for the unusual grace of its prose" (Ellis). Limited edition of 600 copies, this number 395. Beebe's text is based on his own extensive expeditions through Asia, as well as his study of the collections of the leading natural history museums around the world. The illustrations, including portraits of birds and photographs of habitats, add to the beauty and value of the volumes. Anker 31; Ellis 203; Nissen IVB 84; Nissen SVB 41; Tate 119; Wood 228; Zimmer 49.

$4000.00

[Blue-Fronted Amazon] La Perruche à front jaune, mâle
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[Blue-Fronted Amazon] La Perruche à front jaune, mâle

By BARRABAND, Jacques (1767/8-1809)

Paris, 1801. Colour-printed engraving with hand-colouring. Printed by Langlois. This handsome portrait depicts the Blue-Fronted Amazon, one of the most popular and intelligent parrots. Jacques Barraband was the finest ornithological artist of his time. The son of a weaver at the Aubusson Factory, he is first mentioned as a pupil of Joseph Malaine (1745-1809), the eminent flower painter, and is known to have worked for both the Gobelin Factory and the porcelain factory of Sèvres. His most important work was undoubtedly the 300 or so drawings that he produced for François Levaillant's three great ornithological monographs, the greatest of which was the Histoire Naturelle des Perroquets (1801-1805).

$2000.00

[Golden parakeet or conure] Le Perroquet d'Or
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[Golden parakeet or conure] Le Perroquet d'Or

By BARRABAND, Jacques (1767/8-1809)

Paris, 1801. Colour-printed engraving with hand-colouring. Printed by Langlois. The Golden Parakeet lives in the Amazon basin in northern Brazil. Jacques Barraband was the finest ornithological artist of his time. The son of a weaver at the Aubusson Factory, he is first mentioned as a pupil of Joseph Malaine (1745-1809), the eminent flower painter, and is known to have worked for both the Gobelin Factory and the porcelain factory of Sèvres. His most important work was undoubtedly the 300 or so drawings that he produced for François Levaillant's three great ornithological monographs, the greatest of which was the Histoire Naturelle des Perroquets (1801-1805).

$2000.00

American Ornithology; or the Natural History of the Birds of the United States. Illustrated with plates engraved and coloured from original drawings taken from nature
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American Ornithology; or the Natural History of the Birds of the United States. Illustrated with plates engraved and coloured from original drawings taken from nature

By WILSON, Alexander (1766-1813)

New York & Philadelphia: Collins & Co. and Harrison Hall, 1829. 4 volumes. (text: 3 vols., quarto [10 5/8 x 8 1/4 inches]; plates: 1 vol. folio [14 5/16 x 11 inches]). Text: cxcix,[1],230,[1];456 [without a leaf number vii-viii, as usual];vi,396pp., 4pp. subscribers' list at rear of vol.III. (Some light spotting). Atlas: 76 hand-coloured engraved plates, some heightened with gum arabic, by A. Lawson (52), J.G. Warnicke (21), G. Murray (2), and B. Tanner (1), all after Wilson. Expertly bound to style in half red straight-grained morocco over period near-uniform marbled paper-covered boards, the flat spines with title lettered in gilt and a small decorative gilt oval containing the volume number The second full edition of Wilson's work, with plates in their most desirable form, and complete with an uncut copy of the text. "Science would lose little if every scrap of pre-Wilsonian writing about United States birds could be annihilated" (Coues). The first edition of Wilson's life-work was published in nine volumes between 1808 and 1814. The present edition was prepared by Wilson's friend and colleague, George Ord, who improved the work textually by re-arranging the work in a systematic order by species and by contributing an important "Sketch of the Author's Life" (pp.vii-cxcix in the first text volume) as well as numerous additional textual notes. He also notes in his preface to the first text volume that he arranged for the plates to be "carefully examined and retouched" by Alexander Lawson (the original engraver of most of the plates). Reading between the lines of Ord's preface, it is clear that he believed the plates in the present edition to be better than the first, and this is the current general view: it is noted in Fine Bird Books that "the plates [are] coloured better," and Wood writes: "The hand-colored drawings in the atlas are from the original copper plates, colored anew by pigments which seem to have been better quality than those used by Wilson." In addition to the coloring, better quality paper was used in this edition, thus avoiding the foxing which almost inevitably mars the first. Thus, this edition is more desirable than the first. BM (NH), p.2332; Fine Bird Books (1990) p. 155; Nissen IVB 992; cf. Sabin 104598; Wood p.630.

$25000.00

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