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[Collection of 66 plates from Histoire naturelle des oiseaux]
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[Collection of 66 plates from Histoire naturelle des oiseaux]

By BUFFON, Georges Louis Leclerc, Comte de (1707-1788)

Paris: L'Imprimerie Royale, 1786. Small folio. 66 fine hand-coloured engraved plates by and after François Nicolas Martinet, under the supervision of Edmé Louis Daubenton. Early manuscript numbering on each plate. Early manuscript title. Contemporary French cats-paw calf gilt, repairs to joints. Modern slipcase. A fine selection of plates from "One of the most important of all bird books from a collector's point of view" (Fine Bird Books) This work is unusual in that the plates were apparently finished before the text was written. The original idea was that the plates should be used as illustrations for Buffon's Histoire Naturelle générale et particulière , which was finally published in 44 volumes, between 1749 and 1804. The limited number of prints that were possible from each printing plate meant that this was not practical so a replacement set of uncoloured plates was printed. Buffon, left with the very beautiful (but limited in numbers) suites of hand-coloured plates, decided to issue them in a special edition, accompanied by text which he adapted especially for this work, with the help of Philibert Gueneau de Montbeillard and l'Abbé Bexon. This fine selection of plates includes tropical birds such as parrots, toucans, herons, hornbills, with many American species. Anker 76; Fine Bird Books (1990), p. 83; Mengel 411; Nissen IVB 158; Ronsil p.76; Wood p.267; Zimmer, p. 104.

$6750.00

Exploration of Mount Kina Balu, North Borneo
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Exploration of Mount Kina Balu, North Borneo

By WHITEHEAD, John (1860-1899)

London: Gurney and Jackson, 1893. Folio. 32 lithographed plates [14 coloured, 17 tinted]. Publisher's green cloth, upper cover pictorially stamped in black blue and gold. First edition recording the author's ornithological expedition to Borneo, Java, Palawan, the Balabac islands and his ascent of Mt. Kina Balu. The primary object of the expedition was ornithological research, though the plates also include natives, views, insects, mammals, etc. Fine Bird Books 155; Nissen ZBI 4394;Wood p.626; Zimmer p.673.

$3500.00

Brown Pelican. From "The Birds of America" (Amsterdam Edition)
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Brown Pelican. From "The Birds of America" (Amsterdam Edition)

By AUDUBON, John James (1785-1851)

Amsterdam and New York: Johnson Reprint Corporation and Theatrum Orbis Terrarum, 1971. Colour-printed lithograph, on fine hand-made paper. Excellent condition. A portion of the watermark has been trimmed. In October 1971, employing the most faithful printing method available, the best materials and the ablest craftsmen of their age, the Amsterdam firm of Theatrum Orbis Terrarum Ltd., in conjunction with the Johnson Reprint Corporation of New York, set out to produce the finest possible limited edition facsimile of the greatest bird book ever printed: the Havell edition of John James Audubon's well-loved "Birds of America". The Curators of the Teyler's Museum in Haarlem, Holland made their copy of the original work available for use as a model. The Museum, founded in 1778, bought their copy through Audubon's son as part of the original subscription in 1839. After long deliberation, the extremely complex but highly accurate process of colour photo-lithography was chosen as the appropriate printing method. The best exponents of this art were the renowned Dutch printing firm of NV Fotolitho Inrichting Drommel at Zandvoort who were willing to undertake the task of printing each plate in up to eight different colours. The original Havell edition was published on hand-made rag paper and the publishers were determined that the paper of their edition should match the original. Unhappy with the commercially available papers, they turned to the traditional paper manufacturers G. Schut & Zonen (founded in 1625), who, using 100% unbleached cotton rags, were able to produce a wove paper of the highest quality, with each sheet bearing a watermark unique to the edition: G. Schut & Zonen [JR monogram] Audubon [OT monogram]. The publishers and their dedicated team completed their task late in 1972 and the results of these labours were affectionately known as the "Amsterdam Audubon." 250 copies were published and sold by subscription, with the plates available bound or unbound. Given all this careful preparation, it is not surprising that the prints have the look and feel of the original Havell edition. John James Audubon was born in Les Cayes, Haiti on 26 April 1785. From 1788 to 1803 he lived in France until he was sent to the United States to manage an estate that his father had bought in Pennsylvania. He returned to France in 1805, but his fascination with the United States had taken root and he returned again in May 1806. He married Lucy Bakewell in 1808 and together they embarked on a difficult period financially that was only to be resolved, through Audubon's unshakable and justified belief in his own abilities, with the publication of his masterpiece in 1827-1838. "The Birds of America" is the single greatest ornithological work ever produced and is the realization of Audubon's dream of traveling throughout the United States recording, natural size, every native bird then known. The 435 double-elephant folio sized plates, printed by the Havells of London, depict some 1,065 different species, the majority drawn from specimens that Audubon himself had captured. The Havell edition was expensive at the time of publication and this has not changed. Possibly the last complete copy which will ever appear on the market sold for a staggering $8,802,500 in a sale in New York in March 2000. Currently, the increasingly rare individual plates from this edition, when they do appear, generally sell for between $5,000 and $175,000 depending on the image. The quality of the Amsterdam Audubon plates is apparent to any discerning collector and it is becoming ever clearer that they offer the most attractive alternative to the Havell edition plates, given the latter's spiraling prices. Cf. Zimmer, p. 22; cf. Bennett, p. 5; cf. Fries, Appendix A; cf. Wood, p. 208; cf. Nissen IVB 51; cf. Sabin 2364; cf. Ripley 13; cf. Tyler, Audubon's Great National Work , 1993, Appendix I.

$3000.00

Brown Pelican. From "The Birds of America" (Amsterdam Edition)
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Brown Pelican. From "The Birds of America" (Amsterdam Edition)

By AUDUBON, John James (1785-1851)

Amsterdam and New York: Johnson Reprint Corporation and Theatrum Orbis Terrarum, 1971. Colour-printed lithograph, on fine hand-made paper. Excellent condition. In October 1971, employing the most faithful printing method available, the best materials and the ablest craftsmen of their age, the Amsterdam firm of Theatrum Orbis Terrarum Ltd., in conjunction with the Johnson Reprint Corporation of New York, set out to produce the finest possible limited edition facsimile of the greatest bird book ever printed: the Havell edition of John James Audubon's well-loved "Birds of America". The Curators of the Teyler's Museum in Haarlem, Holland made their copy of the original work available for use as a model. The Museum, founded in 1778, bought their copy through Audubon's son as part of the original subscription in 1839. After long deliberation, the extremely complex but highly accurate process of colour photo-lithography was chosen as the appropriate printing method. The best exponents of this art were the renowned Dutch printing firm of NV Fotolitho Inrichting Drommel at Zandvoort who were willing to undertake the task of printing each plate in up to eight different colours. The original Havell edition was published on hand-made rag paper and the publishers were determined that the paper of their edition should match the original. Unhappy with the commercially available papers, they turned to the traditional paper manufacturers G. Schut & Zonen (founded in 1625), who, using 100% unbleached cotton rags, were able to produce a wove paper of the highest quality, with each sheet bearing a watermark unique to the edition: G. Schut & Zonen [JR monogram] Audubon [OT monogram]. The publishers and their dedicated team completed their task late in 1972 and the results of these labours were affectionately known as the "Amsterdam Audubon." 250 copies were published and sold by subscription, with the plates available bound or unbound. Given all this careful preparation, it is not surprising that the prints have the look and feel of the original Havell edition. John James Audubon was born in Les Cayes, Haiti on 26 April 1785. From 1788 to 1803 he lived in France until he was sent to the United States to manage an estate that his father had bought in Pennsylvania. He returned to France in 1805, but his fascination with the United States had taken root and he returned again in May 1806. He married Lucy Bakewell in 1808 and together they embarked on a difficult period financially that was only to be resolved, through Audubon's unshakable and justified belief in his own abilities, with the publication of his masterpiece in 1827-1838. "The Birds of America" is the single greatest ornithological work ever produced and is the realization of Audubon's dream of traveling throughout the United States recording, natural size, every native bird then known. The 435 double-elephant folio sized plates, printed by the Havells of London, depict some 1,065 different species, the majority drawn from specimens that Audubon himself had captured. The Havell edition was expensive at the time of publication and this has not changed. Possibly the last complete copy which will ever appear on the market sold for a staggering $8,802,500 in a sale in New York in March 2000. Currently, the increasingly rare individual plates from this edition, when they do appear, generally sell for between $5,000 and $175,000 depending on the image. The quality of the Amsterdam Audubon plates is apparent to any discerning collector and it is becoming ever clearer that they offer the most attractive alternative to the Havell edition plates, given the latter's spiraling prices. Cf. Zimmer, p. 22; cf. Bennett, p. 5; cf. Fries, Appendix A; cf. Wood, p. 208; cf. Nissen IVB 51; cf. Sabin 2364; cf. Ripley 13; cf. Tyler, Audubon's Great National Work , 1993, Appendix I.

$2000.00

Livre des differentes espèces d'Oiseaux de la Chine tires du Cabinet du Roy ... [Bound with:] Livre des differentes espèces d'Oiseaux, Fleurs, Plantes, et Trophés de la Chine ... 2.e Partie ... [Bound with:] ... 3.e Partie ... [Bound with] ... 4.e Partie
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Livre des differentes espèces d'Oiseaux de la Chine tires du Cabinet du Roy ... [Bound with:] Livre des differentes espèces d'Oiseaux, Fleurs, Plantes, et Trophés de la Chine ... 2.e Partie ... [Bound with:] ... 3.e Partie ... [Bound with] ... 4.e Partie

By HUQUIER, Gabriel (1695-1772), engraver; Jean Baptiste OUDRY (1686-1755), after; and others

Paris, 1745. Four parts in one, folio. (24 1/3 x 18 5/8 inches). 60 hand-coloured engraved plates by Huquier after Jean Baptiste Oudry and others (numbered 1-60), on laid paper watermarked 1742, each inlaid into a larger sheet of laid paper within the album at a contemporary date. Caption titles as above in the lower corner on the first plate of each part. Extra-illustrated with a contemporary original watercolour, also on laid paper, of plate 29. Expertly bound to style in period russia, covers elaborately bordered in gilt with a central gilt device comprised of small tools, spine with raised bands in eight compartments, red and black morocco lettering pieces in the second and third, the others with a repeat decoration in gilt, marbled endpapers and edges An extraordinary collection of large lavishly engraved plates with original 18th century hand-colouring of Chinese birds, flowers, vases and objects: the dénoument of French Rococo Chinoiserie. Huquier was among the most prominent French engravers, printsellers and tastemakers of the mid-18th century, designing or reproducing a prolific amount of ornamentation. The present collection of four suites containing sixty hand-coloured engravings of birds, flowers, botanical arrangements and objects presents the best Chinoiserie of the period. The first part is entirely dedicated to Asian birds; of the other three parts, approximately 25 plates depict intricate and colorful floral arrangements, many in elaborate chinoiserie inspired vases; six depict Asian flora with birds in natural settings; and the remaining illustrate Chinese objects including vessels, snuff boxes and other objects d'art. Besides being a talented designer and engraver, Huquier assembled an impressive collection of art, dispersed in three auctions in 1761, 1771 and 1772, including what is believed to be the largest collection of original watercolours by Oudry. An album of watercolours of birds by Oudry (and presumably from Huquier's collection) is now located at Harvard's Fogg Museum, and confirms that the images of birds in the plates present here were engraved by Huquier after Oudry. Besides having a relationship with Oudry, Huquier was known to have engraved Chinoiserie designs after Fraisse, Watteau, Boucher and others, suggesting other artists of the present engravings. However, given Huquier's own artistic talents, it is quite possible that many of the engravings are after his own work. The extra-illustration of a contemporary watercolour of plate 29, though unattributed, may be by Huquier. The strictly contemporary hand colouring of the plates in this album is simply superb. The extreme high quality of the colouring, coupled with the contemporary inlaid presentation of the plates and the original watercolour, suggests that the album was assembled for a collector of note in the mid-18th century. A similar album, also containing sixty plates, sold in the 1772 auction of Huquier's estate (as lot no. 157, selling for 380 livres). In addition, a similar album of the same four parts comprised of 60 hand coloured plates, extra illustrated with 12 original watercolours in the rear, is located at the Institut National d'Histoire de l'Art, Paris. We find no examples of this work selling at auction since the 18th century, Nissen IVB 465; Lewine, p. 248; Cohen, p. 274; Bruand and Hebert, Inventaire du Fonds Français, Graveurs du XVIIIe Siècle , #1953-2012. cf. Mary Morton, editor. Oudry's Painted Menagerie (2007); cf. Hal Opperman, Jean Baptiste Oudry (1977); Susan Miller, "Jean Antoine Fraisse, grave par Huquier" in Metropolian Museum Journal , vol. 31 (1996), pp. 127-130; Y. Bruand, "Un Grand Collectionneur, Marchand et Graveur du XVIIIe Siècle, Gabriel Huquier (1695-1772)," in Gazette des Beaux-Arts (1950), pp. 99-114.

$165000.00

The Natural History of Carolina, Florida, and the Bahama Islands: containing the figures of birds, beasts, fishes, serpents, insects, and plants; particularly, those not hitherto described, or incorrectly figured by former authors, with their descriptions in English and French
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The Natural History of Carolina, Florida, and the Bahama Islands: containing the figures of birds, beasts, fishes, serpents, insects, and plants; particularly, those not hitherto described, or incorrectly figured by former authors, with their descriptions in English and French

By CATESBY, Mark (1683-1749)

London: Printed for Charles Marsh, Thomas Wilcox and Benjamin Stichall, 1754. 2 volumes, folio. Titles in French and English and printed in red and black, parallel text printed in double columns in French and English. 1 double-page hand-coloured engraved map, 220 hand-coloured etched plates (218 by and after Catesby, most signed with his monogram, plates 61 and 96 in volume II by Georg Dionysius Ehret). With the 4pp. letterpress Catalogue of the Animals and Plants Represented in Catesby's Natural History, from the third edition, here inserted in the rear of the second volume. (Scattered minor foxing). Contemporary russia, covers bordered in gilt, expertly rebacked to style, expert restoration to the board edges and corners, marbled endpapers Provenance: Manchester Library (armorial bookplate) The second edition of the "most famous colorplate book of American plant and animal life ... a fundamental and original work for the study of American species" (Hunt). A beautiful and vastly important work by the founder of American ornithology, this book embodies the most impressive record made during the colonial period of the natural history of an American colony and is the most significant work of American natural history before Audubon. Trained as a botanist, Catesby travelled to Virginia in 1712 and remained there for seven years, sending back to England collections of plants and seeds. With the encouragement of Sir Hans Sloane and others, Catesby returned to America in 1722 to seek materials for his Natural History; he travelled extensively in Carolina, Georgia, Florida, and the Bahamas, sending back further specimens. His preface provides a lengthy account of the development of this work, including his decision to study with Joseph Goupy in order to learn to etch his copper plates himself to ensure accuracy and economy. The end result is encyclopaedic: Catesby provides information not only on the botany and ornithology of the area, but also on its history, climate, geology and anthropology. Catesby writes in the preface of his method of working: "As I was not bred a Painter, I hope some faults in Perspective, and other niceties, may be more readily excused: for I humbly conceive that Plants, and other Things done in a Flat, if an exact manner, may serve the Purpose of Natural History, better in some Measure, than in a mere bold and Painter-like Way. In designing the Plants, I always did them while fresh and just gathered: and the Animals, particularly the Birds, I painted while alive (except a very few) and gave them their Gestures peculiar to every kind of Birds, and where it could be admitted, I have adapted the Birds to those Plants on which they fed, or have any relation to. Fish, which do not retain their colours when out of their Element, I painted at different times, having a succession of them procured while the former lost their colours... Reptiles will live for many months...so that I had no difficulty in painting them while living" (Vol.I, p.vi). The first edition was published in ten parts, with the final part appearing in 1743, plus the twenty plate appendix, which was issued four years later. Work appears to have begun on the present second edition almost immediately, if not simultaneously with the publication of the Appendix in 1747. According to Stafleu & Cowan, the second edition was published between 1748 and 1756. Recent discoveries have suggested that there are multiple issues of the second edition, including early issues that may partly be comprised by sheets from the first edition. The present set includes the first twenty text leaves in their corrected state. References: Cf. Anker 94; cf. Dunthorne 72; cf. Fine Bird Books (1990) p.86; cf. Great Flower Books (1990) p.87; cf Hunt 486 (1st edition); cf. Jackson Bird Etchings p.76; cf. Meisel III, p.341; cf. Nissen BBI 336; cf. Nissen IVB 177; cf. Ripley Yale p.55; Sabin 11508; cf. Stafleu & Cowan TL2 1057; Wood p.281 ('A rare printing') Literature: E.G. Allen 'The History of American Ornithology before Audubon' in Transactions of the American Philosophical Society , new series, vol.41, part 3 (Philadelphia: October 1951) Amy Meyers & Margaret Pritchard Empire's Nature, Mark Catesby's New World Vision (Williamsburg, 1998) Edwin Wolf 2nd, A Flock of Beautiful Birds (Philadelphia, 1977), pp.5-7 (Catesby "was the first to observe and depict North American birds in their natural settings, combining ornithological details with botanic ones") E. Charles Nelson and David J. Elliott, The Curious Mister Catesby (University of Georgia Press, 2015).

$285000.00

American Ornithology; or, the Natural History of Birds inhabiting the United States, not given by Wilson
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American Ornithology; or, the Natural History of Birds inhabiting the United States, not given by Wilson

By BONAPARTE, Charles Lucian (1803-1857)

Philadelphia: Samuel Augustus Mitchell [vol I]; Carey, Lea & Carey [vols II & III]; Carey & Lea [vol IV], 1833. Four volumes, small folio (15 x 12 inches [vols. 2 and 4] and 14 1/2 x 11 1/4 inches [vols. 1 and 3]. 27 hand-colored engraved plates by Alexander Lawson (11 after Titian R. Peale, 15 after A. Rider, and 1 after J.J. Audubon and A. Rider). Foxing to the text, particularly in vols. 3 and 4, though the plates clean throughout. Vols. 2 and 4 uncut. Publisher's half red morocco and marbled paper covered boards First edition, first issue of this important American ornithological work, with the plates beautifully hand colored. Bonaparte's important continuation of Wilson's American Ornithology describes 60 birds not in the original work. "A love for the same department of natural science, and a desire to complete the vast enterprise so far advanced by Wilson's labors, has induced us to undertake the present work," Bonaparte writes in the preface, "in order to illustrate what premature death prevented him from accomplishing, as well as the discoveries subsequently made in the feathered tribes of these States." "The work which had been performed by Wilson's hands alone now gave employment to several individuals. Titian R., the fourth son of Charles Wilson Peale, not only collected many of the birds figured while on the Long expedition, which were credited to Thomas Say, who originally described them in footnotes scattered through the report; or in a subsequent private trip to Florida during the winter and spring of 1825, under the patronage of Bonaparte; but also drew the figures engraved for the first, and two plates for the fourth and last volume. A German emigrant by the name of Alexander Rider, of whom little is known beyond that he was a miniature painter in 1813, and a portrait and historical painter in 1818, was responsible for the remainder of the drawings with the exception of the two figures of plate 4 of volume I..." (Frank L. Burns, On Alexander Wilson ). That plate, the Great Crow Blackbird, is notable as being the first book appearance of any engraving after John James Audubon. Perhaps the most influential artist involved with the work, however, was Bonaparte's master engraver Alexander Lawson, arguably the most talented ornithological engraver in America at that time. Three issues of the first edition of Wilson's continuation have been identified. This set is comprised of the rare first issue of vol. 1 (with the Mitchell imprint and containing the first issue of plate 6 in that volume (see Ellis/Mengel) and with first issues of volumes two through four (published by Carey & Lea and printed by William Brown). Carey & Lea later reissued the first volume, with their own imprint, after purchasing the rights to the publication from Mitchell in 1828. The third issue includes volumes reprinted by T.K. and P.G. Collins (with their imprint replacing that of William Brown) for Carey & Lea with unchanged dates on the titles but actually printed in about 1835 after the completion of the final volume. Anker 47; Bennett 16; Coues 1:609; Ellis/Mengel 312a-b; Fine Bird Books (1990) p. 78; Nissen IVB 116; Sabin 6264; Wood 247; Zimmer p.64.

$7500.00

A Monograph of the Pittidae, or, Family of Ant Thrushes
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A Monograph of the Pittidae, or, Family of Ant Thrushes

By ELLIOT, Daniel Giraud (1835-1915)

New York: D.Appleton & Co, 1863. Folio. (21 7/16 x 13 5/8 inches). 1p. dedication to Philip Lutley Sclater, 1p. list of subscribers. 31 fine hand-coloured lithographic plates, heightened with gum arabic, after Elliot (24), Paul Louis Oudart (4), E. Maubert (1), A.Mesnel (1) and one unsigned, drawn on stone by C. P.Tholey and others, printed and coloured by Bowen & Co. of Philadelphia. Expert repairs at margins of frontispiece plate. Expertly bound to style in half dark green morocco and green cloth covered boards, spine with raised bands in seven compartment, ruled in gilt on either side of each band, lettered in gilt A fine copy of the first edition. A rare and spectacular ornithological work, the first book by Elliot with his own illustrations, and the scarcest of his major monographs. "Elliot was not his own painter, except among the Pittas. Early in his career, in 1863, he had brought out his book on the Pittidae, or Ant-Thrushes with plates of a delightful ... character, after his own drawings" ( Fine Bird Books ). Elliot's chosen illustrator, Paul Louis Oudart, died after completing only 3 or 4 plates, and rather than risk a hurried instruction to another artist, Elliot "felt compelled to turn draughtsman myself" (Preface) and executed all of the other drawings, bar one each by Maubert and Mesnel. The illustrations and indeed the birds themselves represent the pinnacle of Elliot's pictorial work. The Pittidae described are native to Borneo, Nepal, Ceylon, the Philippines, New Guinea, and Cambodia amongst other places. Their plumage is rendered in vibrant shades of blues, greens and reds, and the birds (many of whom are shown feeding their young) are placed against beautifully drawn landscapes. Elliot was also careful to ensure that the flowers and foliage shown in detail with the birds were appropriate for the species shown. When a second edition of this work was issued, most of the plates were redrawn by John Gould's artist, William Hart, and the text was completely rewritten. BM ( NH ) I, p.522; Fine Bird Books (1990), p. 95; Nissen IVB 292; Sabin 22228 (noting that only 200 copies were printed); Wood p.332; Whittell pp.225-226; Zimmer p.208.

$22000.00

Svenska Foglarna
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Svenska Foglarna

By SUNDEVALL, Carl Jacob (1801-1875)

Stockholm: J. & A. Riis (text vol. 1); D & G. Beijer (text vols. 2-4), 1886. 5 volumes, oblong quarto. (9 x 12 3/8 inches). Text in two columns. Plate volume with lithographed title, engraved dedication leaf and 84 hand-coloured lithographed plates, mostly after Peter Akerlund. Contemporary half calf and marbled paper covered boards Scarce set complete with plates and all text volumes: the definitive 19th century work on birds observed in Sweden. Complete with the rare additional text volumes (i.e. vols. 2-4) published by Kinberg after Sundervall's death. "An interesting and systematic account of 238 species ... The plates are well made and greatly assist the identification of varieties ... A complete set is rare" (Wood). ''The plates are most attractive due to the superb quality of their colouring and the careful execution of the drawing'' (Jackson). Nissen IVB 902; Wood p.587; Zimmer p.609; Anker 490; Fine Bird Books, p.110.

$950.00

Le Perroquet Lori-unicolor [Lory (Lorius sp.)]
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Le Perroquet Lori-unicolor [Lory (Lorius sp.)]

By BARRABAND, Jacques (1767/8-1809)

Paris, 1801. Colour-printed stipple engraving. Very good condition. Jacques Barraband was the finest ornithological artist of his time. The son of a weaver at the Aubusson Factory, he is first mentioned as a pupil of Joseph Malaine (1745-1809), the eminent flower painter, and is known to have worked for both the Gobelin Factory and the porcelain factory of Sèvres. His most important work was undoubtedly the 300 or so drawings that he produced for François Levaillant's three great ornithological monographs, the greatest of which was the Histoire Naturelle des Perroquets (1801-1805).

$1250.00

A Monograph of the Jacamars and the Puff-Birds, or Families Galbulidae and Bucconidae
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A Monograph of the Jacamars and the Puff-Birds, or Families Galbulidae and Bucconidae

By SCLATER, Philip Lutley (1829-1913)

London: printed by Taylor & Francis, published for the Author by R.H. Porter, 1882. 7 parts in one volume, royal quarto. (12 3/8 x 9 7/8 inches). 1p. list of subscribers, letterpress title with wood-engraved vignette. 55 hand-coloured lithographic plates by John Gerrard Keulemans, printed by Hanhart. With the original parts front wrappers bound in the rear. Early red half morocco and red pebble-grained cloth-covered boards, spine in six compartments with raised bands, ruled in gilt on either side of each band, lettered in gilt in the second and fourth compartments First edition of this beautifully-illustrated monograph, limited to 250 copies, with plates by Keulemans: "the major bird book illustrator" of his time (Jackson). John Gerrard Keulemans (1842-1912) is described by Christine Jackson as "the major bird book illustrator for 30 years at the end of the 19th century" ( Dictionary of Bird Artists of the World , 1999, p.314), and an artist who "worked to a consistently high standard." This is certainly true of the excellent illustrations in the present work. Every species is carefully depicted against a naturalistic background, with the plumage precisely indicated and beautifully coloured. Sclater notes in the preface that "The Jacamars and Puff-birds formed the subject of some of my earliest studies in Ornithology. Of the former of these families I published a Synopsis in 1852, of the latter in 1856. Since those dates I have not failed to add to my series of examples of both groups whenever the opportunity has presented itself. Assisted by the additional materials thus acquired, and by the excellent collection of the birds... in the cabinets of my friends Salvin and Godman ... it has been a great pleasure to me to go over former ground and ... to give a complete account of what is as yet known of the Jacamars and Puff-birds." The work was issued in seven parts by Sclater, each part priced at one guinea. The size of the work was intended to be uniform with Dresser's Birds of Europe, Sharpe's Kingfishers, Marshall's Barbets , and Shelley's Sun-birds. The Jacamars and Puffbirds are insect-eating birds, natives of the Caribbean, central and south America, and are apparently related to the trogons and woodpeckers. They inhabit the dense tropical forest, and can usually be seen sitting motionless on trees from which they fly out to catch insects on the wing, then return to crack them on a branch before eating them. Anker 451; Fine Bird Books (1990), p.106; Nissen IVB 840; Wood, p.558; Zimmer, p.561.

$7500.00

Catalogues of the birds, shells, and some of the more rare plants, of Dorsetshire. From the new and enlarged edition of Mr. Hutchins's history of that county ... With additions; and a brief memoir of the author
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Catalogues of the birds, shells, and some of the more rare plants, of Dorsetshire. From the new and enlarged edition of Mr. Hutchins's history of that county ... With additions; and a brief memoir of the author

By PULTENEY, Richard (1730-1801); and Thomas RACKETT (1757-1841)

[London: Printed by and for J. Nichols, Son, and Bentley, 1813. Folio. (19 1/2 x 12 inches). Text in two columns. iv, 110pp. Engraved portrait, 24 engraved plates on 13 sheets. Uncut. Some foxing. Later cloth-backed grey paper boards. Large-paper issue of the first illustrated edition of a rare catalogue of British birds, plants and shells. Richard Pulteney received his doctorate in medicine from the University of Edinburgh in 1764, before serving as the personal physician to the Earl of Bath. Following the Earl's death, he resided and practiced in Blandford, Dorset. Besides membership in a host of medical societies, Pulteney was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society, as well as a Fellow of the Linnean Society. Indeed, he was an early promoter of Linnaean taxonomy, and authored the first English biography of Linnaeus in 1781. His cabinet of specimens, noted particularly for its shells, was donated to the Linnean Society following his death in 1801. The first edition of 1799 was privately-published by Pulteney with few copies printed. An inscription in an extant copy by the editor of this new edition reveals that copies of the first edition were further destroyed by fire: "The first Impression of Dr. Pulteney's Catalogues was printed in 1801 [i.e. 1799], but never published, the whole having been destroyed by the fire, at Mr. Nichols's printing office [in 1808]. I have been enabled to make considerable additions in this second impression, from communication by various scientific friends, and from my own obervations." Rackett's revised edition was the first to be illustrated, containing a portrait of Pulteney, a plate depicting 17 shells titled Melbury Fossils (engraved by J. Cary after Mary Foster), and 23 engraved plates of shells on 12 sheets. The plates numbered I-XXIII are new engravings of those by De Costa in his Historia Naturalis Testaeorum Britanniae, with several additions, depicting over 200 species. The present copy is a very rare large-paper issue, printed on wove paper (the 1799 and regular issue of 1813 being on laid paper), with a variant title without imprint. This large-paper issue is not recorded by the usual bibliographies. BM(NH) IV:p. 1622; Pritzel 7367; Nissen, ZBI 3250.

$3500.00

The Magazine of Natural History, and Journal of Zoology, Botany, Mineralogy, Geology, and Meteorology ... [New Series, Vols. 1-4]
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The Magazine of Natural History, and Journal of Zoology, Botany, Mineralogy, Geology, and Meteorology ... [New Series, Vols. 1-4]

By CHARLESWORTH, Edward (1813-1893), editor

London: Longman, Orme, Brown, Green, and Longmans, 1840. 4 volumes, 8vo. 19 engraved plates (one double-page). Publisher's green cloth, covers stamped in blind A complete run of Charlesworth's continuation of Loudon's Magazine of Natural History. Volume 4 includes an essay (with an engraved plate) by Waterhouse concerning two Carabideous insects collected by Charles Darwin in South America during the Beagle voyage. Also of Darwin interest is a review of the Zoology of the Beagle in vol. 3. This complete run of the new series includes submissions by many of the most notable natural historians of the day and include a number of submissions concerning the flora and fauna of Australia.

$1500.00

American Flamingo
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American Flamingo

By AUDUBON, John James (1785-1851)

Leipzig: Ariel Press, 1972. An exceptional and scarce copy of a print made for but not used in the beautifully printed and richly coloured "Leipzig" edition of Audubon's Birds American Flamingo is one of the most desirable plates in the Birds of America, Audubon's masterpiece. This stunning reproduction issue was made using a now antiquated printing technique called collotype which yields quite rich, oil paint-type colours. The Leipzig edition of Audubon's Birds was produced in the early 1970's. The plan was to reproduce 40 plates: 20 vertical and 20 horizontal from Audubon's work of which 500 would be bound in two vol;umes and 500 would be sold loose. Not all the plates produced were used however including this marvellous rendition of the Flamingo, one of the most popular and evocative of all Audubon's Birds. It is consequently quite rare.

$1500.00

Six Full Color Prints Humming Birds. A Portfolio of Six Magnificent Color Prints..
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Six Full Color Prints Humming Birds. A Portfolio of Six Magnificent Color Prints..

By GOULD, John

New York: I. B. Fischer, 1946. Six photoreproductions: 20 x 16 inches each in printed wrapper. The six hummingbirds are: Heliodoxa Jacula, Hylonympha Macrocerca, Thalurania Refulgens, Petasophora Iolata, Heliothrix Purpureiceps, Glaucis Fraseri. "A portfolio of six magnificent color prints reproduced with life-like fidelity to the rare originals by the famous 19th century ornithologist-artist, John Gould. Included are beautiful studies of the Great Forked Tail Humming-bird, Fraser's Barbed Throat, The Violet-Ear, Venezuelan Wood-Nymph, and Purple-Crowned Fairy..." (from the Port Folio).

$500.00

[Pair of Original Watercolors featuring the Buffle-Headed Duck and the King Eider Duck]
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[Pair of Original Watercolors featuring the Buffle-Headed Duck and the King Eider Duck]

By [STONE, SARAH, attributed]

[London, 1790. Two watercolors, each on laid paper, each approximately 9¾ x 13¾ inches. Matted and framed. Two original watercolors by Sarah Stone of American species of ducks. A splendid pair of original watercolors featuring ducks by Sarah Smith (née Stone), a prolific painter of natural history subjects in London between 1777 and 1806. Stone worked exclusively for Sir Ashton Lever, documenting Lever's vast private collection of ornithological, zoological, and ethnographical specimens. Stone's work is admired today for the delicacy of the brushwork, a deft touch with color, and the requisite skill necessary to tackle such a diverse range of subject matter. Of the various subjects which Stone saw fit to translate to canvas, ornithological subjects were her favorite, and constitute the majority of her known work. Her earliest studies of birds date from 1777, when she was only seventeen years old. At the time, she concentrated her efforts on the sole subject at hand, only later adding backgrounds and other life subjects into her paintings. Stone also favored sized paper, an uncommon practice at this time in British painting, and used exceedingly fine brush strokes, with brushes used for the lightest feathers likely containing only one or two hairs. Though unsigned and undated, it is likely that the current examples emanate from this early period of Stone's work, since the ducks are featured by themselves, and on sized, laid paper, and exhibit Stone's fine brushwork. In addition, the contemporary ink annotations along the top edge are in the same hand, though not Stone's hand, as other known ornithological examples of her work dated before 1790. Whomever they belong to, the contemporary notations on Stone's work contain important information about each subject, including the name of each duck, in this case the "Buffel-headed Duck" and the male "King Duck." Following the name of each duck is a citation corresponding to John Latham's General Synopsis , published between 1781 and 1785. For example, the Buffle-headed duck carries the annotation "La. Syn. 6. p.533" which corresponds to Latham, Synopsis , volume six, page 533. A similar notation is found along the top edge of the King Eider duck. This is a practice peculiar to known examples of Stone's birds, since she and Latham were working from some of the same specimens in the Leverian Museum. Further, Latham specifies in his text for the General Synopsis that he used specimens from both his own extensive collection and that of his specimen-collecting rival, Ashton Lever. Each painting also displays an annotation in Latin along the top right edge, corresponding to the subject's Linnaean classification. Interestingly, in 1781, Lever acquired thousands of natural history specimens from Captain Cook's third voyage. It is possible that these two paintings represent ducks collected by Cook's crew on the Northwest Coast of America. "During the late 1770s and throughout the 1780s, Sarah painted at Ashton Lever's museum (or the Leverian Museum, as it came to be called) in Leicester House, Leicester Square, London. She may have asked permission to draw some object from this extraordinary collection of natural history specimens, ethnographical artefacts and other curiosities, and so came to the notice of their owner. Ashton Lever soon commissioned her to record the outstanding articles, both zoological and ethnographical, in his collection. Sarah signed her watercolors, and dated some of them, but the signed and dated watercolors are in the minority" - Jackson. Indeed, Lever held a high opinion of Stone's work, commenting in an advertisement for an exhibition of over 1,000 of Stone's watercolors at his museum in 1784 that Stone had "succeeded in the effort beyond all imagination." Both of these paintings come from Credit Suisse's Americana Collection and were previously held by the Wall Street investment firm of Donaldson, Lufkin & Jenrette (acquired by Credit Suisse in August 2000). The paintings were likely acquired by Richard Jenrette at Sotheby Parke- Bernet Galleries in New York in April 1968, where Stone paintings of a Bufflehead and a King Eider were offered. In that sale, the King Eider duck achieved $350 by itself. A stunning pair of paintings from an artist whose place of importance in the history of 18th-century ornithological studies is only beginning to be realized. Jackson, Christine E. Sarah Stone. Natural Curiosities from the New Worlds . (London: Merrell Holberton and the Natural History Museum, London, 1998), pp.9-36;138.

$18500.00

The New and Heretofore Unfigured Species of the Birds of North America
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The New and Heretofore Unfigured Species of the Birds of North America

By ELLIOT, Daniel Giraud (1835-1915)

New York: Published by the Author, 1869. 2 volumes, large folio. (23 3/16 x 18 1/8 inches). 1p. list of 71 subscribers. 73 hand-coloured lithographic plates (including the additional "Parus occidentalis" plate bound between plates I and II in vol.I; 1 plate by and after Elliot and Joseph Wolf, printed by D. McClellan & Brothers of New York; 72 printed and coloured by Bowen & Co. of Philadelphia, after Elliot [55], Joseph Wolf [15] or Edwin Sheppard [2], drawn on stone by Ch. P. Tholey (11), 'M.P.' (14), 'H.J.S.' (3) or 'L.H.' (1) and others), 21 wood-engraved vignette illustrations, on india paper mounted, by W.J. Linton after Edwin Sheppard. Contemporary 19th-century green half morocco over green cloth-covered boards, spines lettered in gilt, marbled endpapers, top edge gilt A spectacular work with very fine generally life-size hand-coloured lithographs of species not previously pictured by either Alexander Wilson or John James Audubon, and particularly on birds of the American West, here with an additional plate that is not recorded by the standard bibliographies. Elliot describes his aims in the preface: "Since the time of Wilson and Audubon, no work has been published upon American Ornithology, containing life-size representations of the various species that have been discovered since the labors of those great men were finished. The valuable productions of Cassin, as well as the revised edition of the ninth volume of the Pacific Rail Road Report, the joint labor of Messrs. Baird, Cassin and Lawrence had indeed appeared ... but no attempt had been made to continue the works of the first great American naturalists in a similar manner ... It was, therefore, with the desire to contribute ... towards the elucidation of the comparatively little known species of the Birds of North America, their habits and economy, as well as to render their forms familiar so far as life-size representation of them might serve to do, that I undertook the present publication." Over half of the plates in the work are devoted to birds of the American west, including California, Arizona, New Mexico, Texas and the Rocky Mountains, with many of the remaining depicting birds of the Alaskan and Arctic regions. The specimens pictured by Elliot were derived from a number of sources, but included birds brought back from government-sponsored overland expeditions to the West, as well as from private sources such as John Xantus de Vesey. The plates for Elliot's work (with the exception of plate 17 in volume II) were executed by Bowen of Philadelphia, the same lithographer as in Cassin's continuation of Audubon. The project, however, would prove the last for the noted firm, as it closed down shortly after the present work was completed. The plates are taken from originals by Elliot and one of the greatest ornithological artists working in the second half of the nineteenth century: Joseph Wolf. In particular, Wolf's image of the Iceland Falcon (the second plate in volume II) must rank as one of the great bird portraits of all time, and is a worthy successor to the images in Audubon's own masterpiece. The story behind the additional plate is perplexing and illusive. Auction records show that copies with an additional plate have been sold at auction nine times in the past thirty years. These nine appearances represent at least three different copies of the book and possibly as many as eight, so the presence of the 73rd plate in the present copy is not unique. In the text (which does not call for a plate) Elliot notes that the bird which the additional plate pictures ("Parus Occidentalis") it is not a new species at all, but a mis-identified Black-capped Chickadee ("Parus Atricapillus"). If this conclusion was reached by Elliot at a late stage in the book's production then he could have been in the position of having a supply of the plates completed, but with no reason to include them in a book on birds that had not been pictured before. Strangely, none of the standard bibliographies mention the existence of this additional plate. Anker 129; Bennett, p.39; Fine Bird Books (1990) p.95; Nissen IVB 294; Reese Stamped with a National Character 44; Sabin 22227; Wood p.331; Zimmer p. 205.

$36000.00

Ramphastos osculans. Osculant Toucan. [Osculated Toucan (Ramphastos osculans)]
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Ramphastos osculans. Osculant Toucan. [Osculated Toucan (Ramphastos osculans)]

By GOULD, John (1804-1881)

[London: by the Author, 1835. Hand-coloured lithograph by John and Elizabeth Gould, printed by C.Hullmandel. Wove paper. A fine image from the first edition of John Gould's 'A Monograph of the Ramphastidae, or Family of Toucans' The toucan family is limited to Mexico, Central and South America and some West Indian islands. The first time that any member of the family was described was by Gonzalo Fernandez de Oviedo y Valdes in his "de la natural hystoria de las Indias" (Toledo, 1526, chapter 42), in 1555 Pierre Belon included an illustration of its beak in his "L'Histoire de la nature des oyseaux" (Paris, 1555, p.184). Andre Thevet first used the name 'Toucan' with a long description, and a woodcut of a whole bird, in his "Singularitez de la France" (Paris, 1555, pp.88-90). The Latin name "Burhynchus" or "Ramphestes" (in reference to the size of the beak) was suggested by Conrad Gesner ("Icones Avium", 1560, p.130), and Linnaeus later adopted Aldrovandus' corrupted form of the latter ("Ramphastos") which is how the family was still recognized at the time of the publication of the present image. The present image is from the first edition of Gould's work, published in 1833-1835, which represented the first concerted attempt to produce a monograph on the family. A second expanded edition was published between 1852 and 1854. Gould considered this to be completely separate work as the plates were all re-drawn and the text re-written. Cf. Anker 170; cf. Fine Bird Books (1990), p. 101; cf. Nissen IVB 378; cf. Sauer 3; cf. Wood p. 364; cf. Zimmer p. 252.

$3500.00

The Ornithology of Francis Willughby ... In three books. Wherein all the birds hitherto known ... are accurately described. Translated into English, with many additions. To which are added three considerable discourses, I. Of the art of fowling ... II. Of the ordering of singing birds. III. Of falconry. By John Ray
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The Ornithology of Francis Willughby ... In three books. Wherein all the birds hitherto known ... are accurately described. Translated into English, with many additions. To which are added three considerable discourses, I. Of the art of fowling ... II. Of the ordering of singing birds. III. Of falconry. By John Ray

By WILLUGHBY, Francis (1635-1672); and John RAY

London: John Martyn, 1678. 3 parts in one volume, folio. Title printed in red & black. 80 engraved plates (2 unnumbered, plus plates numbered 1-78), 2 letterpress tables. Expertly bound to style in half eighteenth century russia and marbled paper covered boards First edition in English of "one of the most important treatises on ornithology of all time, being the first systematic classification of the birds of the world" (Wood). John Ray and his pupil and friend Francis Willughby toured Europe gathering material for their planned complete classification of the vegetable and animal kingdoms. After Willughby's early death in 1672 Ray took over his notes, and having edited the incomplete manuscript and added his own observations published his friend's work in 1676 as Francisci Willughbeii ornithologiae libri tres; totum opus recognovit, digressit, supplevit Joannes Raius . The present work, a translation by Ray, was published two years later and includes three more plates than the Latin edition, and an expanded text including three additional sections by Ray on fowling, falconry and song-birds. Anker 532; BM (NH) V, p.2331; Keynes Ray 39; Nissen IVB 991; Wood p.629; Wing W-2879; Zimmer 677.

$6000.00

A Monograph of the Pheasants
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A Monograph of the Pheasants

By BEEBE, William Charles (1877-1962)

London: published under the auspices of the New York Zoological Society by Witherby and Co, 1927. 4 volumes, folio. (15 15/16 x 11 3/4 inches). Titles in red and black, 90 coloured lithograph or collotype plates, after A. Thorburn, G.E. Lodge, H. Gronvold, L.A. Fuertes, Chas. R. Knight, H. Jones, and E. Megargee, 88 photogravure plates (many with 2 images) from photographs by Beebe and others, 20 distribution maps printed in red and black by Stanford's, the chromolithographs and photogravures with captioned tissue-guards. Publisher's maroon cloth, upper covers and spines lettered in gilt, top edge gilt First edition of perhaps the greatest ornithological work of the last century, "notable not only for its beauty and the wealth of information it contains, but also for the unusual grace of its prose" (Ellis). Limited edition of 600 copies, this number 395. Beebe's text is based on his own extensive expeditions through Asia, as well as his study of the collections of the leading natural history museums around the world. The illustrations, including portraits of birds and photographs of habitats, add to the beauty and value of the volumes. Anker 31; Ellis 203; Nissen IVB 84; Nissen SVB 41; Tate 119; Wood 228; Zimmer 49.

$4000.00

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