Sign In | Register


RECENT ARRIVALS


Next >
A Simple story.
seller photo

A Simple story.

By INCHBALD (Mrs. [Elizabeth]).

In Four volumes. By Mrs. Inchbald. London: Printed for G.G.J. and J. Robinson, Pater-noster [Paternoster in volume two] Row, 1791. 4 Vols., f’cap 16mo in half sheets; half-title in each volume; integral blank at end of volume two; 8pp. integral advertisements at end of volume four, continuing the signatures; [ ]2, A4, C-I, K-P8, Q5; [A]2, B-I, K-R8; [A]2, B-I, K-O8, [ ]1; [A]2, B-I, K8, L7, M4; pp.[iv]+vii+[i (blank)]+233+[i (nine entry Errata to First Volume)]; [iv]+253+[i (fourteen entry Errata to Second Volume)]+[ii]; [iv]+209+[i (five entry Errata)]; [iv]+157+[i (six line Errata)]+[viii]; contemporary full tree-calf, spine ruled and tooled gilt, with red lettering-piece and dark green numbering piece bearing red oval onlay in centre carrying the volume number; binder’s blanks at front an back. Some joints cracked, but firm on the cords and end-papers; insignificant insect damage to spine and heads and tails of joint in one volume, not affecting end-papers or text; otherwise a fine copy internally. The second state of text in which gathering E in volume three is correctly imposed. (A very scarce first state exists in which it has been wrongly imposed). A blank may be lacking at the end of volume one, but has been so in every copy we have seen; the missing L8 in volume four is presumably the unsigned leaf at the end of volume three. Minor differences in style (such as the presence or absence of taper rules on the half title, or the corresponding use of commas rather than full stops to divide the letters of the Roman figure date on the title-page) suggest that the text was distributed between two printers, one setting volumes one and two, the other volumes three and four. NCBEL, 2: 843; CBEL, II, p.472; ESTC, T134770; Block, p.118; Raven & Forster, 1791:41: none of the above listing variants; this title not in Rothschild. “‘A Simple Story’ explores in much greater psychological depth issues and behavioural patterns that also preoccupied her in her plays... its overall effect is to disturb eighteenth-century complacency about the benevolence of paternal power in a way Inchbald’s dramas did not’ - ODNB. All books listed by Robert Temple are first editions unless otherwise stated.

$1029.46

The High-German Doctor.
seller photo

The High-German Doctor.

By [HORNECK (Philip).].

With many Additions and Alterations [omitted in volume two]. To which is added, a large Appendix, With an Explanatory Index. In Two Volumns [sic] [omitted in volume two]. Vol.I [II]. London Printed, and Sold by the Booksellers of London and Westminster [London, Printed, and Sold by J. Roberts, near the Oxford- Arms in Warwick Lane], 1720 [1719]. Sm. f’cap 12mo; nothing present before title-page in each volume; title leaf to first volume probably a cancel; final blank in each volume; pp.[ii]+295+[49 (not paginated)]+[ii]; [ii]+304+[26 (not paginated)]+[ii]; [A]1, B - I, K - P12, Q5; A - I, K - O12; recent natural half polished calf, marbled grey-green sides, spine ruled gilt and blind, tooled blind over cords with guinea-roll; numbered direct, within compartments, and with brown lettering-piece. A good deal of marking and dusting, particularly to outer leaves, but a good copy, nonetheless, finely bound. Originally issued semi-weekly, folio, in single leaves printed in double column, between May 4th, 1714 and May 12th, 1715, and reprinted in book form by Roberts in 1719, the present volume one representing the second issue, with a cancel title-page dated 1720. P.272 of volume two is blank, p.273 carrying a sectional title-page, blank on verso, reading: “The High-German Doctor Concluded. With a lively Representation of our Present Distempers: The several Symptoms Explain’d. Andproper Cure Recommended. London: Printed in the Year 1719.” P.295 in volume one and the unpaginated leaves in both volumes are the Index. A fantastic, rampling, tissue of nonsense and political abuse, cast as fiction, the work may have influenced Southey’s seven volume work ‘The Doctor’. The author, a Whig, was satirised by Pope in the ‘Dunciad’. NCBEL, 2:1275 All books listed by Robert Temple are first editions unless otherwise stated.

$236.79

Genuine and Impartial Memoirs Of Elizabeth Canning, Containing A complete History of that unfortunate Girl, From her Birth to the Present Time, and Particularly every remarkable Occurrence from The Day of her Absence, January 1, 1753, to the Day of her receiving Sentence, May 30, 1754.
seller photo

Genuine and Impartial Memoirs Of Elizabeth Canning, Containing A complete History of that unfortunate Girl, From her Birth to the Present Time, and Particularly every remarkable Occurrence from The Day of her Absence, January 1, 1753, to the Day of her receiving Sentence, May 30, 1754.

By ANONYMOUS.

In which is included, The whole Tenor of the Evidence given against, And for her, on her late extraordinary Trial. With some Observations On the Behaviour of the Court, and the Conduct of the Jury. Also Free and Candid Remarks On Sir Crisp Gascoyne’s Address. London: Printed for G. Woodfall at Charing-Cross, 1754. 12mo; half-title not called for; final page blank; pp.vi+293+[i]; A3, B - I, K - N12, O3; recent full natural fine-grain morocco (but probably in fact a brilliant plasticised imitation!), ruled and tooled blind and gilt on spine, brown lettering-piece ruled and lettered gilt; oil-marbled end-papers. Title-page embrowned and with small chip to lower fore-corner; a little scattered light foxing and marking, chiefly of early leaves; a few small corners turned; otherwise, and in general, a nice copy. Very scarce. Probably the First Detective Novel.Despite the unpromising title, a very readable epistolary novel in the manner of Richardson (whose ‘Pamela’ is mentioned in the text), and an essay in detective fiction precursive in its method of Edgar Allen Poe’s ‘The Mystery of Mary Roget’ - taking as its subject-matter and structural principle the events surrounding the (temporary) disappearance of an eighteen year old girl, Elizabeth Canning, and the subsequent investigations which culminated: first in the trial of a notorious bawd, Mother Wells, and a gypsy, Mary Squires, for robbing and imprisoning her at the former’s house in Enfield Wash (an area which seems not greatly to have changed its character in the last quarter millenium or so!); and subsequently in the trial and conviction of the girl herself for perjury. The persona writing the letters claims to have visited the alleged scene of the imprisonment - and other places involved in the development of the story - and also to have interviewed witnesses; but the main part of the novel is concerned with the development and analysis of the evidence, in real time, as it came to be presented through the medium of the pamphlet and newspaper war that surrounded the trials, the statements, depositions, etc. of the principals and witnesses, or at the Court hearings themselves. Most of the documents referred to are presented either in footnotes or in the body of the text (including full transcripts of the two ‘Informations’ given before Henry Fielding, and witnessed by him in his capacity of magistrate, which are referred to, but not transcribed, in his own pamphlet on the Canning affair). Besides its interest as a novel, and the fact that it is possibly the earliest example in fiction of an analytical method applied to a series of criminous events, it offers the fullest contemporary presentation of the circumstances surrounding these two celebrated trials, and presents a very credible argument for its conclusions. Anonymous as it is, it was advertised at the time as having been compiled by a society in Charge of Canning’s case - a statement which should not be taken as meaning her defence. Not in Block, Hubin, or Summers; Raven, 267; ESTC T144508; British Library, Oxford, Wellcome, Cambridge, National Trust, and Leeds copies only on COPAC. All books listed by Robert Temple are first editions unless otherwise stated.

$3496.43

[Within typographical border:] The Honour Of Chivalry.
seller photo

[Within typographical border:] The Honour Of Chivalry.

By [SHIRLEY or SHURLEY (John)].

Or, The Famous and Delectable History Of Don Bellianis of Greece. Containing The Valiant Exploits of that Magnanimous and Heroick Prince; Son unto the Emperour Don Bellaneo of Greece. Wherein are described, the Strange and Dangerous Ad- Ventures that befel him: with his Love toward the Princess Florisbella, Daughter to the Soldan of Babylon. [Rule] Translated out of Italian. [Rule] Sed tamen est tristissima janua nostræ, Et est unus tempora a prima pati. [Rule] London, Printed for Tho. Passinger, at the Three Bibles on London-Bridge, 1683. Sm.4to, not watermarked; half-title not called for; leaf headed‘The Translator’s Epistle to the Gentle Reader’ [not signed], follows title leaf; pp.[iv]+124+123 - 242; A - I, K - U, X - Hh4. BOUND WITH: [SHIRLEY or SHURLEY (John)]. [Within a typographical border:] The Honour of Chivalry: The Second and Third Part: Being a continuation Of the First Part of the History Of the Renowned Prince Don Bellianis Of Greece. Containing his many strange and won- Derful Adventures; as Fights with Monsters and Gy- Ants, Dissolving Inchantments, Rescuing Distressed Ladies, overthrowing Tyrants, and obtaining the fair Princess Florisbella in Marriage. Together, with the rare Adventures of Many other Heroick Emperours, Kings, Princes, and Knights, with their Amorous Intrigues and fortunate Success in their Undertakings. [Rule] Being worthy the perusal of all Persons, as well for its pleasant- Ness as the profit that they may accrue thereby. [Rule] Written by J.S. Gent. [Rule] London, Printed for T. Passinger, at the Sign of the Three Bibles, on London-Bridge. 1683. Apparently Imp.16mo in quarter sheets (i.e., gathered in fours), the watermark being a large crown and the chain-lines running horizontally; half-title not called for; leaf headed To the Reader and signed at end ‘J. Shurley’ follows title leaf; large historiated initials throughout; pp.[4]+167+[i (blank)]; A2, B - I, K - U, X - Y4. Two volumes bound in one, both printed in black letter and Roman type; nineteenth century full Russia bound after a seventeenth century model, the sides with gilt panel surrounded by broad leaf-and-flower rolls, the spine with four bands and five panels, ruled and tooled elaborately gilt and lettered direct in the second panel; decorative gilt rolls to edges of boards and turn-ins; a.e.g.; end-papers faced light brown. Later re-back, preserving the old backstrip; small puncture to leather (only) in centre of front board; in the the first part: some of the (mostly early) leaves cropped rather close at some lower edges with loss of about twenty catchwords and all or part of the last line of text on leaves A4, C4v, F1, F4r, H1, H2, and H4; paper flaws to blank fore-margin of U1, and blank lower margin of 2C4; small chip to blank lower margin of Z3; neat repair to lower margin of 2G1 with loss of two or three words on the recto; pen trials on blank margins of 2B2v and 2B3r; in the second part: strip lacking from blank lower margins of G3 and G4, due to an original paper fault; insignificant marking to a few scattered leaves in both volumes; otherwise nice. Two volumes evidently printed and issued separately, but in the same year, and usually found together. The First Part, translated from the Italian version of Oration Rinaldi, published in 1598, contains like its model only the first fifty of the sixty-eight chapters of the original Spanish romance, Historia del magnanimo, et invincibil principe Belianis de Grecia, by Jer¢nimo Fern ndez, published in Spain in 1545. It was not, and does not claim to have been, translated into English by Shirley, but is a reprint of the 1650 version translated by Francis Kirkman and reprinted several times up until 1673. Kirkman had added a Second and a Third Part, both written by himself, in 1664 and 1672, and the present Second and Third Parts consist of a paraphrase of them by Shirley, who writes in his remarks ‘To the Reader’ at the start of Part Two that the romance is “now illustrated and put into the newest dialect” by himself. He also added some rather bad verse. These Parts provide “the unique instance of an English continuation of one of the Spanish romances” (Henry Thomas, Spanish and Portuguese Romances of Chivalry’, CUP, 1920, pp.257-8.), and are set partly in England and Ireland. In this copy, possibly as always, p.38 of Part One has been misnumbered ‘93’, and p.39 ‘38’; p.69 ends ‘hap=’ whilst p.70 begins ‘happiness’; and gathering 2C has been laid-out wrongly in the forme, pp.200 and 201 following p.195, and pp.196 and 197, preceding p.202 (which is mis-numbered ‘102)’, whilst the signature mark ‘Cc2’ appears correctly at the foot of p.197 but as the last leaf of the gathering and backed, of course, by the incorrectly numbered p.‘101’. The front pastedown bears the engraved armorial bookplate of Henry Francis Lyte, writer of the hymns ‘Abide with Me’ and ‘Praise my Soul the King of Heaven’, and sometime tutor to the Prime Minister, Lord Salisbury. The verso of the second binder’s blank bears the 1883 rubber ownership stamp of Alexander Gardyne. The first printing of the version by Shirley (not reprinted until 1703) and very scarce. COPAC records only the Oxford, National Library of Scotland, Leeds, and Lambeth Palace copies. Wing (2nd Edition), F780; ESTC, R24084 All books listed by Robert Temple are first editions unless otherwise stated.

$2429.63

The Two cousins, A Moral story, For the use of young persons.

By [PINCHARD (Mrs.).].

In which is exemplified The necessity of moderation and justice To the attainment of happiness. By the Author of The Blind Child, And Dramatic dialogues. [taper rule; quotation from Beaumont and Fletcher; taper rule] London: Printed by E. Newbery, at the corner of St. Paul’s Church-yard, 1798. [Entered at Stationers [sic] Hall.] 12mo; half-title lacking; fine copper-engraved frontispiece; without the 4pp. publisher’s advertisements at end; pp.[viii]+144; contemporary full tree sheep. Sheep cracking slightly over joints, and free end-papers lacking; one leaf torn without loss; dusting and some small marks passim; as a working copy. The second edition of a title published originally in 1794. Juvenile. NCBEL, 2:1027, not noticing this second edition.1 Mrs. Pinchard was the author of a number of works of fiction, including a couple of adult three-deckers. All books listed by Robert Temple are first editions unless otherwise stated.

$86.10

Letters On the English nation: By Batista Angeloni, A Jesuit, Who resided many years in London.
seller photo

Letters On the English nation: By Batista Angeloni, A Jesuit, Who resided many years in London.

By [SHEBBEARE (John)].

Translated from the Original Italian, By the Author of the Marriage Act a Novel. Vol. I [II].London: Printed in the Year 1755. Two vols. bound in one, Demy 8vo (not watermarked); half-titles not called for; list of Errata to both volumes on A4v of volume two (eight and eleven entries); binder’s blank at front and back; pp.lx+[iv]+228; [viii]+296; A, b - d, B - I, K - P8, Q2; A4, B - I, K - T8, U4; contemporary speckled calf, spine with five bands raised over the cords, elaborately tooled gilt in compartments and on bands, lettered direct; sides ruled gilt, edges tooled blind; edges burnished light brown. Joints partially cracked (but firm), top of spine slightly worn; a very little scattered light foxing or spotting; unobtrusive contemporary ownership inscription on first title-page; otherwise a very nice copy with good margins. An epistolary novel, published pseudonymously, as allegedly written by an Anglicised Italian Jesuit, “whose long residence in England and analytical nature had endowed him with the insight and neutrality to develop a sweeping analysis of the decline of the English constitution, morals, manners, and culture under the corrupt rule of the Whigs. The selection of a Jesuit as a narrative persona encouraged allegations that Shebbeare was a Jacobite at heart, prompting the Whig antiquary Thomas Birch to revile the Letters as ‘a Book, which an Englishman and a Protestant must detest.’” — M. John Cardwell, DNB.. Although Shebbeare began adult life as a physician and chemist, in the 1740s he became closely involved in politics, and in 1754 embarked on a career as a writer. His first novel, The Marriage Act, was prompted by his objection to a passage in the 1753 Marriage Act. His growing engagement with politics during the 1750s was emphasised by publication of the present novel. Aspects of English life observed by Shebbeare include the cleanliness of English and French women compared, Welsh customs, academies of painting and sculpture, the effects of printing, English taste in architecture, theatrical writers, David Garrick, etc. It was this book that allowed Boswell to profess that Shebbeare deserved respect in London’s literary circles after he was imprisoned for his political writings. ESTC T88373; NCBEL, 2:998; Sabin 80053; Black, Epistolary novel, 727. All books listed by Robert Temple are first editions unless otherwise stated.

$529.39

The History Of The famous preacher Friar Gerund De Campazas: Otherwise Gerund Zotes.
seller photo

The History Of The famous preacher Friar Gerund De Campazas: Otherwise Gerund Zotes.

By [ISLA y ROJO (José Francisco de).].

Translated from the Spanish. In two volumes. London: Printed for T. Davies, in Russel-Street, Covent-Garden; And W. Flexney, in Holborn, 1772. 2 Vols., Demy 8vo (watermarked with fleur-de-lys); half-title not called for in volume one, not present in volume two; twenty-nine entry Errata (plus translator’s note) on A4v in volume one; twenty-two entry Errata on [Mm8r] in volume two; pp.[viii]+564; [ii]+541+[i (blank)]+[i (Errata leaf, blank on verso]; A4, B - I, K - U, X - Z, Aa - Ii, Kk - Nn8, Oo2; [-]1, B - I, K - U, X - Z, Aa - Ii, Kk - Mm8; contempoary full natural calf, spine with five bands raised over the cords, ruled and numbered direct, gilt, recent red lettering-piece; a.e. burnished brown. Expert, almost invisible, restorations to calf of spines, and end-papers almost invisibly strengthened at hinges; lacking the back free end-paper to volume two (a fact which is not obvious because the facing page is blank; first and last couple of leaves in each volume stained at margins from the turn-ins of the calf, and one gathering with some light foxing; small hole in Aa8 of volume two, probably due to an original paper flaw, with loss of all or part of six letters in total; otherwise, and in effect, a very nice copy. The first appearance of Volume II. in any language.The first volume is a translation of Isla’s ‘Historia del famoso predicador fray Gerundio de Campazas, alias Zotes’, as published originally under the name Don Francisco Lob•n de Salazar, in 1758, but slightly cut by the removal of a lengthy “declamation against a Portuguese book not worth a long confutation,” as the translator’s Advertisement explains, together with “some episodical criticisms on foreign learning, in which [the author] talks with too much peremptoriness of what he was but indifferently qualified to talk of”, whilst “some of the didactic parts likewise are curtailed”. Though the first volume was originally published in Spanish, it was suppressed in 1760 by the Inquisition, with the result that the second volume, which was just then ready to be printed, never appeared, and this translation, made, as the Advertisement again records, from the author’s “only copy of [the manuscript], partly written by a careful amanuensis, and partly with his own hand”, represents the first appearance of the second portion of the work in any language. A picaresque novel, written in the tradition of Cervantes, and full of fresh humour, wit, and irony, the story is that of a peasant boy who rises to prominence as a preacher by means of his smooth tongue. It constitutes a biting satire on the charlatanism and bombast of the popular preaching friars of the day, combining a satirical and burlesque narrative fiction about bad preachers, who continued to follow the pompous and pedantic style of the Gongoran Baroque, with a didactic treatise on sacred oratory. The author also intersperses various stories and jokes, and it includes incidentally the first appearance in print of the phrase ‘accidentally on purpose’. The translator is usually thought to have been Thomas Nugent, though it has also been attributed to Ferdinando Warner. ESTC, T63924 All books listed by Robert Temple are first editions unless otherwise stated.

$344.42

Belisaire.

By MARMONTEL (M. [Jean-François]).

Par M. Marmontel, De l’Académie Françoise. A Paris, Chez Merlin, Libraire, rue de la Harpe, A l’Image S. Joseph, 1767. Avec Approbation, & Privilége du Roi. 12mo; half-title present; blank leaf follows last page of Préface; [ ] ii, a vi, A-I, K-O xii, P iv; pp.[4 (half-title and title)]+x (Preface)+[ii]+340+[iii (Approbation / Privilége)]; text-paper binder’s blank before half-title, text-paper end-papers; original full sprinkled calf, spine with five raised bands, ruled and tooled (and in one case lettered) gilt in compartments. Leather cracked and a little chipped over back joint; front joint slightly cracking; corners of boards a trifle worn; small burn hole in blank upper margin of half-title; small hole due to an original paper flaw in blank lower margin of leaf D i; otherwise a nice copy. First edition, first issue (the Approbation later being suppressed) and the earliest state of text (without the ‘Addition’ leaf that was added later to some copies): copy on ordinary paper, without plates. TOGETHER WITH: MARMONTEL (M. [Jean-François]). Belisaire. Par M. Marmontel, De l’Académie Françoise. A Paris, Chez Merlin, Libraire, rue de la Harpe, A l’Image S. Joseph, 1767. Avec Approbation, & Privilége du Roi. Lge.cr.8vo; half-title present; copper engraved frontispiece and three plates by C. le Vasseur after H. Gravelot; [-], A-I, K-T, V-Xviii, Ziv; pp.[4 (half-title and title)]+x (Preface)+[ii]+340+[iii (Approbation / Privilege)]+[i (blank)]; two binder’s blanks at front, one at back; lacking the blank leaf ([-]viii) which should follow the Préface; contemporary full calf gilt, brown burnished edges. Rebacked, with black label; corners of boards worn; some foxing and marking passim, more or less confined to margins; small neat early name stamp on upper margin of title-page and one other leaf. First edition, first issue (the Approbation later being suppressed) and the earliest state of text (without the ‘Addition’ leaf that was added later to some copies): copy on large and thick paper. TOGETHER WITH: MARMONTEL (M. [Jean-François]). Belisaire. Par M. Marmontel; [sic] De l’Académie Françoise. A Paris, Chez Merlin, Libraire, rue de la Harpe, A l’Image S. Joseph, 1767. Avec Approbation, & Privilége du Roi. 12mo; copper engraved frontispiece and three plates by C. le Vasseur after H. Gravelot; half-title lacking, possibly not called for; first gathering mis-imposed, so that ‘a iij’ precedes ‘a ij’; leaf headed ‘Addition A la Note de la Page 237.’ precedes ‘Approbation’, etc., blank leaf, apparently integral, follows it; [avi], A-I, K-O xii, P vi; pp.[2 (title)]+x (Préface)+340++[ii]+[iii (Approbation / Privilege)]+[iii (blank)]; text-paper binder’s blank before frontispiece, text-paper end-papers lining pink, grey and white marbled paper end-papers; original full watered calf ruled gilt on sides, rebacked with late Victorian alligator-grain cloth, unlettered, but with small paper label bearing old shelf-mark. Leather a little worn on sides and almost invisibly repaired on edges; endpapers renewed, preserving the original free end-papers; small mark on two pages due to small squashed insects; otherwise a nice copy. First edition, first issue (the Approbation later being suppressed): copy on ordinary paper, with plates, and the extra leaf of ‘Additions’. GOOD MATERIALS FOR A DOCTORAL DISSERTATION! ALL THREE PRINTINGS OF THE FIRST EDITION. The ‘Catalogue hebdomadaire’ lists three issues for the 7th February 1767: one 12mo, without plates, at 2 livres, (which we refer to below as ‘A’); one 12mo, with plates, at 3 livres (which we refer to as ‘C’); and one 8vo, with plates, at 5 livres (which we refer to as ‘B’). All are offered here. All three issues are set to the same measure, and the pagination is the same, but ‘A’ is signed and gathered in sixes up to gathering ‘O’, the final gathering, ‘P’, being of four leaves, the first two of which bear respectively the signature marks P and Pii. It appears to have been printed first, the formes being then unlocked and re-imposed for printing as 8vo, the page signatures being appropriately altered at the same time, all but the last: the second leaf of the final signature, ‘Z’, retaining the original 12mo signature ‘Pii’. This provides a logical sequence, if not actual proof, that ‘A’ was printed in advance of ‘B’, and also shows that the type used was the same. It may be hypothesised that the plates were not ready by the time that ‘A’ was printed (and perhaps, bound). The formes were then once more unlocked and the type apparently stored for a time (v. below) before being re-imposed for printing as 12mo, a number of alterations being made to the text at the same time. In the course of this re-imposition for ‘C’, the layout of the first gathering was mismanaged, and ‘a iij’ in the present copy (pp.v-vi) has been folded to precede ‘a ij’ (pp.iij-iv). Issues ‘A’ and ‘B’ share certain peculiarities, not shared by ‘C’, which suggest a closer relationship between them than with that: both for example have the full stop after ‘PRÉFACE’ on p.[i] raised level with the mid-stroke of the ‘E’, where in ‘C’ it is correctly aligned. Likewise the type ornaments in ‘A’ and ‘B’ are the same, but those in ‘C’ are sometimes different (the head-ornament on p.[i] for instance, or the tail ornament on p.20 or p.32) suggesting that though the type was kept standing, some at least of the type ornaments may have been plundered for use elsewhere before ‘C’ came to be printed. Revisions and corrections, sometimes erroneous, were carried out between each of the three printings: the drop-head ‘BELISAIRE’ on p.1 of ‘A’, for instance, was corrected to ‘BÉLISAIRE’ in ‘B’, but restored to ‘BELISAIRE’ in ‘C’, presumably because that capital ‘E’ had not been accented either in the title-page or running heads, though other capitalised acute ‘E’s had been, as, for example, throughout, in ‘PRÉFACE’. The major differences in text, however, as far as a brief examination can determine, are not between ‘A’ and ‘B’, but between them and ‘C’: opening the volumes pretty well at random we find on p.viij, for example, ‘A’ and ‘B’ read ‘L’historien Procope’ whilst ‘C’ reads ‘L’Historien Procope’; on p.18 the antepenultimate line in ‘C’ reads ‘savez’ where the other two read ‘scavez’; on p.205 ‘change;’ in the last line in ‘A’ and ‘B’ becomes ‘change,’ in ‘C’. More obviously, as well, ‘C’ has a leaf of ‘Additions’ at the end of the text, not present in ‘A’ or ‘B’. There is at least one difference in lineation also: though all three issues are set generally 24 lines to the page p.326 has an extra line in ‘A’ and ‘B’, but the correct number of lines in ‘C’. Other variants (pp.19 and 92, which are one line short, and pp.94, and 124, which have an extra line) are the same in all three printings. We have hypopthesised that the final blank present in this copy of ‘C’ is integral because the position of the chain-lines across the page matches those of the last gathering, but not the backing leaf of the end-papers. The text of Bélisaire ends on p.272 in all three volumes, the remaining pages being occupied by a reprint of Marmontel’s “Fragmens De Philosopie morale”, this being supplied with a fly-title included in the pagination. There is no list of plates, but they are marked to face the start of chapters VI, VII, and XVI (pp.57, 69, and 255), and do so where called for in each case. The 8vo issue offered here is not to be confused with the 240pp. 8vo edition, with a corrected text set to a larger measure, which was published later the same year. Marmontel’s views on toleration and freedom of opinion, as expressed in ‘Bélisaire’ have earned it a place in eighteenth century philosophical thought as well as fiction. All books listed by Robert Temple are first editions unless otherwise stated.

$642.74

Secret Memoirs Of the late Mr. Duncan Campbel, The Famous Deaf and Dumb Gentleman.

By [?DEFOE (Daniel) and HAYWOOD (Eliza)].

Written By Himself, who ordered they Should be publish’d after his Decease. To which is added, An Appendix, by Way of Vindication Of Mr. Duncan Campbel, against that groundless Aspersion cast upon him, That he but pretended to Be Deaf and Dumb. London: Printed for J. Millan, at the Green Door, the Corner Of Buckingham-Court; and J. Chrichley, at the London-Gazette, Charing-Cross, 1732. Post 8vo; copper-engraved portrait frontispiece by Price after Hill on text-paper; half-title not called for, but without the initial blank present in some copies; leaf bearing The Names Of the Subscribers, and Contents leaf, follow title leaf; separate title-page to the Appendix (included in the pagination); [A]?4, B-I, K-Q8; pp.[2 (frontispiece)]+[vi]+239+[i (blank)]; contemporary watered calf, leather spine label tooled and lettered gilt. Boards worn at corners; calf rubbed and worn about edges, and somewhat crudely rebacked with sheep, but preserving the original slightly chipped label; front free end-paper renewed; old (and rather faded) ownership stamp at head of title-page; original paper fault in lower margin of leaf I2 with loss of two words; two or three leaves with insignificant marks on margins; the text in general very nice. A large copy. Not to be confused with ‘The History of the Life and Adventures of Mr. Duncan Campbell’ written by Defoe in collaboration with William Bond (and, possibly, Eliza Haywood) and published in 1720; or ‘A Spy upon the Conjurer: or, a Collection of Surprising Stories, with Names, Places, and particular Circumstances relating to Mr. Duncan Campbell’, written by Eliza Haywood and published in 1724. After Campbell’s death in 1730, the present volume was possibly projected by Defoe, but written by Eliza Haywood on the basis of materials left by him at his own death in 1731. The portrait frontispiece is identical to that in the work published in 1720, to which also there is allusion in the text. Largely concerned with fortune-telling, magic, witchcraft, and other aspects of the occult. The second title-page reads: ‘An Appendix, By Way of Vindication Of Mr. Duncan Campbel, Against That Groundless Aspersion cast upon Him, That he but pretended to be Deaf and Dumb. By a Friend of the Deceased. London: Printed in the Year 1732.’ Eighty-six copies were subscribed for. Whicher, ‘Eliza Haywood’, 59 and pp.85-9; Esdaile, p.179; McBurney, 273; not, apparently, in NCBEL, or CBEL; ESTC, T72257; not in Rothschild. All books listed by Robert Temple are first editions unless otherwise stated.

$762.76

Almoran And Hamet: An Oriental tale.

By [HAWKESWORTH (John).].

In two volumes [this in volume one only]. The second edition. Vol. I [II]. London, Printed by C. Say: For H. Payne and W. Cropley, At Dryden’s Head in Pater-noster-Row, 1761. 2 Vols., f’cap 8vo format (watermarked ‘PRO PATRIA’ and Britannia); half-title present in each volume; final leaf of volume one a single inset; pp.viii+146; [iv]+156; [A]4, B - I, K8, L1; [A]2, B - I, K8, L6; contemporary sprinkled calf, spine with four bands raised over the cords, spine ruled and numbered gilt, lettering-piece; engraved armorial bookplate of Almeric Hugh Paget, 1st Baron Queenborough on front end-papers. Spines very defective, and two boards detached; inscriptions obliterated on front binder’s blanks; single worm-hole through extreme lower inner margin of first four gatherings in volume two; occasional light dusting and one or two small marks, the text in general, however, nice. As a binding copy. An entirely different setting of text from the first edition of the same year. CBEL, II, p.467; NCBEL, 2: 836; ESTC, T57815; Block, p.99, listing this printing only. As with the first edition, though Hawkesworth’s name does not appear on the title-page, his name, in type, appears at the end of the dedication. All books listed by Robert Temple are first editions unless otherwise stated.

$86.10

Cecilia, Or Memoirs Of an Heiress.

By [BURNEY (Frances, Mme. d’Arblay)].

By The author of Evelina. In five volumes. London: Printed for T. Payne and Son at the Mews- Gate, and T. Cadell in the Strand, 1782. 5 Vols., 12mo; half-titles not called for, but bound up without the terminal blanks to volumes one and five; [ ]1, A-I, K-M12, N3 (ex 4); A-I, K-L12; A-I, K-P12, Q3; A-I, K-N12, O8; A-I, K-Q12, R7 (ex 8); pp.[ii]+293+[i (blank)]; 263+[i (blank)]; 365+[i (blank)]; 328; 398; contemporary full natural calf, spine with five raised bands, ruled and numbered gilt, red lettering-piece; sprinkled edges. Re-backed in Edwardian times, the new leather somewhat chipped and fragile, and all boards detached; consistent small original paper fault resulting in insignificant hole in some thirteen leaves spread through the five volumes, not touching text; but in volume one affecting one letter of catch-word in leaf I4r, and in all some five letters in middle of C12, and in volume two affecting one letter in the middle of leaf C10; a few leaves slightly snagged at top- or fore- margin by the binder’s knife; a very little insignificant foxing or small marks; short marginal tears in D6 in volume one, M2 in volume three (both resulting from original paper faults), and K3 in volume five, made good without use of tissue; long tear to L12 in volume five similarly mended without loss; unobtrusive old repair to short tear in blank upper margin of O8 in volume four; old restoration to chipped blank corners of F11 and 12, and blank lower fore-corner chipped from leaf R7 in volume five; in general, however the text excellent, the sewing entirely sound throughout. The author’s second novel, and a good deal scarcer than the third: printed on paper that sometimes resembles thin tissue. NCBEL, 2: 971; CBEL, II, p.527; ESTC, T102228; Block, p.53 (under D’Arblay); Rothschild, 547 and 548 (Dr. Burney’s copy, like this without the final blank in volume five). In the present copy, K10r in volume two has a garbled catchword ‘oprop’ for ‘opport’ (the ‘r’ being in fact upside-down). All books listed by Robert Temple are first editions unless otherwise stated.

$816.10

A Simple story.

By INCHBALD (Mrs. [Elizabeth]).

In Four volumes. By Mrs. Inchbald. London: Printed for G.G.J. and J. Robinson, Pater-noster [Paternoster in volume two] Row, 1791. 4 Vols., f’cap 16mo in half sheets; half-title in each volume; integral blank at end of volume two; 8pp. integral advertisements at end of volume four, continuing the signatures; [ ]2, A4, C-I, K-P8, Q5; [A]2, B-I, K-R8; [A]2, B-I, K-O8, [ ]1; [A]2, B-I, K8, L7, M4; pp.[iv]+vii+[i (blank)]+233+[i (nine entry Errata to First Volume)]; [iv]+253+[i (fourteen entry Errata to Second Volume)]+[ii]; [iv]+209+[i (five entry Errata)]; [iv]+157+[i (six line Errata)]+[viii]; contemporary full natural calf, spine ruled and tooled gilt, with red lettering-piece and oval dark green numbering piece. First two volumes excellently rebacked in matching style, preserving the original lettering-pieces; one or two scattered fox-spots and small marks; small hole in leaf E3 in volume two due to an original paper fault, affecting page numbers; D8 in volume four with two short tears in fore-margin and slightly trimmed at fore- and lower- margins; small hole in leaf H7 due to an original paper fault affecting running head but without loss; otherwise, and in general effect, a very nice copy. The very scarce first state of text in which gathering E in volume three has here been wrongly imposed, the order of the pages running 49, 54, 55, 52, 53, 50, 51, 56, 57, 62, 63, 60, 61, 58, 59, 64. A blank may be lacking at the end of volume one, but has been so in every copy we have seen; the missing L8 in volume four is presumably the unsigned leaf at the end of volume three. Minor differences in style (such as the presence or absence of taper rules on the half title, or the corresponding use of commas rather than full stops to divide the letters of the Roman figure date on the title-page) suggest that the text was distributed between two printers, one setting volumes one and two, the other volumes three and four. NCBEL, 2: 843; CBEL, II, p.472; ESTC, T134770; Block, p.118; Raven & Forster, 1791:41: none of the above listing variants; this title not in Rothschild; this state of text not in the British Library. “‘A Simple Story’ explores in much greater psychological depth issues and behavioural patterns that also preoccupied her in her plays... its overall effect is to disturb eighteenth-century complacency about the benevolence of paternal power in a way Inchbald’s dramas did not’ - ODNB. All books listed by Robert Temple are first editions unless otherwise stated.

$1496.18

The Consolidator: Or, Memoirs Of Sundry Transactions From the World in the Moon.

By [DEFOE (Daniel).].

Translated from the Lunar Language, By the Author of The True-born English Man. London: Printed, and are to be Sold by Benj. Bragg At the Blue Ball in Ave-mary-lane, 1705. Post 8vo; publisher’s advertisements on lower half of last page; A2, B-I, K-U, X-Z8, Aa4; pp.[iv]+360; contemporary sprinkled calf, pleasantly rebacked in matching style, spine with five raised bands. Original end-papers expertly and unobtrusively strengthened at gutters; ms. note on blank fore-margin of B1; small burn hole in G8, with loss of two letters of text on each side of the leaf; slight marginal foxing to F3 - F6; short tear to upper margin of M1, not approaching text, and another to the upper margin of M4 (in the same place, suggesting a folding or trimming error); gatherings A, H, N, and Q to the end variously embrowned (v. note); otherwise an excellent copy, with good margins. Printed on three different paper stocks: the first, which is whitest, being used for gatherings B, C, E, F, G, I, L, and O; the second, cream toned, for gatherings D, K, and P; the third, a thinner paper that was probably slightly toned to start with, but tends to develop a species of mottled embrowning, for gathering [A] (the half-title and title), and for gatherings H, N, and Q to the end. In the present copy this paper stock is less seriously darkened and mottled than in many copies we have seen. We have had several copies of this book in a binding closely similar to the present one, and hypothesise it is a publisher’s calf. Moore, 93; Wright, 68; NCBEL, 2: 887; CBEL, III, p.499; ESTC, 4166; Esdaile, p.202; Rothschild, 737, noting that “though ‘this prose satire contains the first hints of many of the ideas which Swift afterwards embodied in Gulliver’ (Lowndes, art. Defoe) there is no positive evidence that Swift ever read or possessed a copy of ‘The Consolidator’.” According to Esdaile the work was ‘Reprinted with additions’ later the same year. All books listed by Robert Temple are first editions unless otherwise stated.

$1309.49

Mordaunt.

By [MOORE (Dr. John).].

Sketches Of Life, characters, and manners, In Various countries; Including the Memoirs Of A French lady of quality. By the Author of Zeluco & Edward. Vol.I [II; III]. London: Printed for G.G. and J. Robinson, Paternoster-Row; S. Hamilton, [so Vol.I; vols.II & III: By S. Hamilton] Falcon-court, Fleet-street, 1800. 3 Vols., lge post 8vo; half-titles not called for; [A]2, B-I, K-U, X-2C8, 2D2; [A]2, B-I, K-U, X-2C8, 2D4; [A]2, B-I, K-U, X-2F8, 2G6; pp.[2]+ii+403+[i (blank)]; [2]+ii+408; [2]+ii+460; contemporary full watered calf, spine ruled and tooled elaborately gilt, with black lettering-piece; brown burnished edges; marbled end-papers. Minute chip to one extreme headband; spines just a little rubbed; some gatherings folded badly, with irregular margins; some staining or marking, mostly of lower margins; two leaves with light dampstaining of margins; short tear in lower margin of P8 in volume two, and small hole in lower margin of G1 and 2G1 of volume three, due to an original paper fault; 2D2 and 2D3 in volume two supplied in facsimile; otherwise a nice copy. The first printing of Moore’s original English text of a novel published in a French translation in 1798. Cast in epistolary form, and including reference to contemporary personages and events - in particular the French Revolution and the war. The following errata or typographical faults have been noted in this copy: in volume two: p.70, last line, for ‘former’ read ‘latter’; p.354 in heading to letter for ‘Miss’ read ‘Mrs’; in volume three: the ‘B’ of signature mark ‘B4’ turned on its side, the ‘4’ slanted; p.93, l.2, for ‘lady’ read ‘Lord’; p.237, l.21, for ‘Diana’ read ‘Deanport’. CBEL, II, p.551; NCBEL, 2: 148; ESTC, T57357; Block,p.165. All books listed by Robert Temple are first editions unless otherwise stated.

$157.86

Memoirs Of the Court of France, And City of Paris: Containing The Intrigues of that Court, and the Characters of the Ministers of State, And other Officers; together with The Occurrences of the Town.

By [AULNOY (Marie Catherine Jumelle de Berneville de la Motte, comtesse d’).].

In Two Parts. Translated from the Original French. London, Printed for Jacob Tonson at Grays-Inn-Gate, Rich- Ard Wellington at the Dolphin and Crown in St. Paul’s Church-Yard, George Strahan at the Golden Ball in Cornhill, and B. Lintot at the Middle-Temple-Gate-Fleet-Street, N.D. [1702]. Post 8vo, two parts in one volume; nothing present before title leaf; two interpolated leaves on whiter paper follow Kk8 in Part II; [-]1, *2, p2, +4 (+2 signed ‘+’), B -I, K8, L4; Aa - Ii, Kk8, Ll2, Ll (bis) - Ss8; pp.[xviii (not paginated)]+152; 1 - 164+161 - 288; contemporary full sprinkled panelled calf tooled blind on sides and spine, spine with five raised bands, red lettering-piece. Rebacked, preserving the original lettering-piece and the old binder’s blanks at front and back; new (sympathetic) end-papers; poor quality paper with light uniform embrowning throughout; single fox-spot to blank lower margin of ‘L1’; two or three small fox-spots to blank lower fore-corner of ‘Cc6’; otherwise a very nice copy. Factional anecdotes published originally in French in 1692, and here first translated following the success of her similar ‘Memoirs of the Court of Spain’ published in England in 1692 and reprinted in 1701. “Her historical writings are partly borrowed from existing records to which she adds much that must be regarded as fiction and some vivid descriptions of contemporary manners.” - World Encyclopaedia. McBurney 28 lists her similar compilation, ‘Memoirs of the Court of England’ published some five years later, but not the other titles. CBEL, II, pp.534 and 535 (the latter under a Mary Manley entry) lists the other two titles, but not the present one. The same sheets are found with variant title pages giving various combinations of the publishers, the present title-page, listing all four, being apparently the scarcest. COPAC records only the British Library, and Cambridge copies, to which ESTC adds Thomas Plume’s Library in Great Britain; and the University of Missouri elsewhere. In this copy the closing parentheses round the page numbers of pp.140 and 141 in Part I. are lacking; in Part II p.93 is mis-paged ‘63’; p.129 is mis-paged ‘1229’; and p.219 is mis-paged ‘119’. All books listed by Robert Temple are first editions unless otherwise stated.

$749.42

The true Secret history Of the Lives and Reigns Of All The Kings and Queens Of England, From King William the First, Called the Conqueror, to the End of The Reign of the late Queen Anne.

By [SOMERS (John, Baron)].

To which is Prefixed An Abstract of the General History Of each Reign. Collected (chiefly) from Original Manuscripts, And the most valuable Private Memoirs, and Authentick Historians. By a Person of Honour. In Two Volumes. London: Printed for D. Browne Junr. at the Black-Swan Without Temple-Bar, 1725. 2 Vols., cr.8vo format, not watermarked; nothing called for before titles; page numbers 289 - 320 in volume one reduplicated (but not text); pp.[vi]+320+289 - 391+[i (blank)]; [ii]+320; A3, B - I, K - T, (Tt), (Ttt), U, X - Z, Aa - Bb8, Cc4; A1, B - I, K - U, X8; contemporary full panelled sprinkled calf, ruled and tooled blind on sides, spine with five raised bands, brown lettering piece, numbered on, edges tooled gilt. Slight splitting to calf at head of one joint, but no weakness; occasional headlines sligtly shaves in volume one; trimming fault to blank lower fore-corner of O2 and O3 in volume one, leaving an extra flap of paper on O3 and a corresponding loss to O2; in same volume, small blank corner lacking to P1, and Z4, and small hole to blank fore-margin of Z1, the first and last being original paper flaws; title-page to volume two torn upwards from lower margin, and repaired on verso with old paper; otherwise an excellent copy in a handsome contemporary binding. The first volume, apart from the first gathering, is typographically distinct from the second one: a fact that is explained by it consisting of sheets having been originally issued in 1702, whilst the whole of the second volume is now first published. The sheets of the first volume are here reissued as originally printed except that the Table of Contents has been suppressed and the address ‘To the Impartial Reader’ has been reprinted together with the new, updated, title-page. Imagination applied to history, largely in an anecdotal form: a somewhat curious hybrid, but included in McBurney’s ‘Check List of English Prose Fiction’ under 1725, as item 170. He does not record the 1702 issue, or the further re-issue made in 1730. In typesetting the first volume the printer evidently lost some of his copy: the inserted gatherings (Tt) and (Ttt) forming the first pp.289 - 320 were the result. In the present copy, besides the reduplicated page numbers noticed above, p.260 in volume one is misnumbered 250, and p.304, 404; the page numbers (but not the text) to pp.362, 363 and 366, 367 have been swapped; in volume two, p.220 is misnumbered 20. Not in NCBEL; ESTC, T177202, listing copies at Cambridge (2), Cashel Cathedral Library, and Edinburgh University in Great Britain; and eight copies elsewhere. All books listed by Robert Temple are first editions unless otherwise stated.

$1069.46

The Court Of Atalantis [sic].

By ANTHOLOGY.

Containing A Four Years History of that Famous Island, Political and Gallant; Intermixt with Fables and Epistles In Verse and Prose. By several Hands. Printed and Sold by J. Roberts in Warwick-Lane, 1714. Half-title not called for; Contents leaf at end; A4, B-I, K-U8, X4; pp.[2]+vi+310+[ii]; contempoary full sheep, spine with five raised bands, ruled gilt on sides, ruled and lettered gilt on spine. Recently rebacked with calf, and with new end-papers, the old free end-papers being preserved; early ownership inscription on upper margin of title page; a few marginal ink notes in text (v. below); two gatherings with extensive light foxing, and two leaves with insignificant marginal damp-stain; otherwise a very nice copy. The marginal notes on some five leaves identify the originals of characters in one of the stories. Not in Rothschild; or Esdaile; McBurney, 69; NCBEL, 2: 348 and 987; CBEL, II, p.877, giving the title erroneously as ‘The Court of Atlantis’, and p.191, where it is given correctly, and listing also editions of 1717, 1720, and 1732 under the revised title ‘Court Tales’. According to CBEL the volume was edited by John Oldmixon. According to the unsigned Dedication to Sir Richard Temple, one of the stories was written by Charles Sackville, Earl of Dorset. Sackville died in 1706. The other stories remain anonymous, with the exception of ‘Æsculapius, Or the Hospital of Fools. By William Walsh, Esq;’ which is provided with its own half-title. They are sometimes attributed, however, to Jodocus Crull and Mary Manley. In this copy p.178 is numbered 26. Since it is the twenty-sixth (and final) page of ‘Æsculapius’ (inclusive of the half-title), this may perhaps suggest that story originally to have been set separately. This is not unlikely: two editions of another work edited by Oldmixon were published in 1714, both including ‘Æsculapius’ as an addendum. Walsh died in 1708. The ‘four years’ of the title is a reference to the time that had elapsed before the first publication of this volume since that of the four parts of Mary Manley’s ‘The New Atlantis’ in 1709-10. COPAC records only the British Library, National Library of Scotland, Trinity College Dublin, and Aberdeen copies in Great Britain; ESTC adds the Huntington, Yale, Folger, Library of Congress, Newberry, Illinois, Kansas, and Harvard copies elsewhere. All books listed by Robert Temple are first editions unless otherwise stated.

$789.43

[Title to first volume:] Travels Into several Remote Nations Of the World.

By [SWIFT (Jonathan)].

In Four parts. By Lemuel Gulliver, First a Surgeon, and then a Captain Of several Ships. To which are prefix’d, Several Copies of Verses Expla- Planatory [sic] and Commendatory; never be- Fore printed. Vol. I. The Second Edition. London: Printed for Benj. Motte, at the Middle Temple Gate in Fleet-street, 1727. [Title to second volume:] Travels Into several Remote Nations Of the World. By Captain Lemuel Gulliver. Part III. A Voyage to Laputa, Balnibarbi, Glubbdubdrib, Luggnagg and Japan. Part IV. A Voyage to the Houyhnhnms. Vol.II. The Second Edition, Corrected. London: Printed for Benjamin Motte, at the Middle- Temple-Gate, 1727. Four parts in two volumes, bound in one (in fact as issued), each part separately paginated and with separate prelims; separate title present to each volume; fly-titles present to Parts one, two, and four (none called for to part three); engraved portrait frontispiece and two maps in volume one; three engraved maps and one diagram in volume two; integral advertisement leaf precedes title-page in volume two; [A]1, a2-7, b4, *2, A2-7, B-I, K-U8, X4, Y1; [ ]1, A3, B-I, K8, L4, M2; 2A4, 2B-2I, 2K-2N8, 2O4; pp.[i-ii]+[24 (unpaginated)]+[iii]-xii+148+[vi (unpaginated)]+164; [viii (unpaginated)]+155+[i (blank)]+[viii (unpaginated)]+199+[i (blank)]. Victorian full sheep, oil-marbled end-papers; edges burnished scarlet. Front board lacking; chip in blank fore-margin of portrait, not approaching printed area; small hole at inner margin of leaf B7 in volume one affecting three letters of text; blank corner of I3 in same volume chipped, not affecting text; two or three leaves towards start of volume one, and towards end of second volume a little foxed in margins; otherwise a nice large copy. Second Edition, with corrections and additions (the fore-matter to volume one being here first added), with the Second Edition title leaves to both parts (many copies of the Second Edition having been issued with the first edition title leaves), and with the frontispiece portrait (which is sometimes lacking). The frontispiece in this copy is in the third state (Teerinck, 2a), having the inscription round the medallion frame of the portrait and two lines of Perseus beneath, and chain lines in the paper which run vertically. Corresponds to the British Library copy bearing the shelf-mark 12612.d.22, except that the two leaves signed ‘*’, inserted after leaf b4 in volume one, are not present in the British Library copy. These, which contain the thirty lines of verse headed ‘The Words of the King of Brobdingnag...’, are on paper of a slightly darker colour than the bulk of the volume, resembling that on which the plates are printed: they were added to later-issued copies of the volume. Leaves B7, C3 and C4 in the same volume are on similar paper, and would appear to be cancels or possibly added from another copy. NCBEL, 2: 1062, recording this edition as issued ‘2 vols in 1’; ESTC, T139025; Teerinck-Scouten, 293, erroneously recording the first inserted gathering in volume one as being signed ‘22-7’, having mis-read a damaged ‘a’; he also records the Roman pagination as being in upper instead of lower case letters, which it has not been in any copy we have seen; Rothschild, 2108. Rothschild, 2104, note, records that “The text of the first edition [of 1726] was heavily ‘edited’ by the publisher, Motte, and contains many inaccuracies. Although in his covering letter to Motte, pseudonymously signed ‘Richard Sympson’, Swift appeared to sanction cuts for prudential reasons, he strongly objected to the ‘mangled’ version which appeared in print. At Swift’s request [Charles] Ford prepared a list of errata which was sent to Motte [in a letter dated January 3rd, 1727], and resulted in nearly all the minor corrections being made in the second edition of 1727, though the cuts and alterations remained.” The prefatory verses are now thought to be by Pope. All books listed by Robert Temple are first editions unless otherwise stated.

$1322.83

Edward Barnard; Or, Merit exalted; Containing The history Of the Edgerton family.
seller photo

Edward Barnard; Or, Merit exalted; Containing The history Of the Edgerton family.

By PILKINGTON (M[ary].S. [née HOPKINS]).

London: Printed for E. Newbery, at the corner of St. Paul’s Church-yard, 1797. 12mo; Half-title apparently not called for; copper-engraved frontispiece; B-H12; pp.167+[i (blank)]; contemporary full sprinkled sheep, ruled gilt on spine. Slight wear to leather; back free endpaper lacking; otherwise a nice copy. Juvenile. CBEL, II, p.559; NCBEL, 2: 1028; ESTC, T73529, Block, pp.184-5. Mary Pilkington was the author of numerous works of fiction, several of them printed by the Minerva Press: this appears to have been her first children’s book, and second novel. All books listed by Robert Temple are first editions unless otherwise stated.

$589.40

The Adventures Of Peregrine Pickle.

By [SMOLLETT (Tobias George, M.D.).].

In which are included, Memoirs Of a Lady of quality. In Four volumes. London: Printed for the Author: And sold by D. Wilson, at Plato’s Head, near Round-Court, in the Strand, 1751. 4 Vols., 12mo; half-titles not called for; final blank in volumes two and three; Erratum on verso of last leaf of Contents in volume three; [A]1, a4, B-I, K-N12; [A]1, a4, B-I, K-O12, P6; [A]1, a2, B6, C-I, K-O12, P4; A4, B8, C-O12, P6; pp.ix+[i (blank)]+288; x+322+[ii]; v+[i (Erratum)]+305 (paged 205)+[iii]; vii+[i (blank)]+315+[i (blank)]; contemporary full sprinkled calf, spine with five raised bands and lettering-piece, ruled gilt on sides and spine. Three lettering-pieces lacking; some peeling and slight chipping of calf; small hole in M10 of volume two, with no loss of text, due to an original paper flaw; another in H2 of volume three, with loss of one letter on each side of the leaf, due probably to a spark, top fore-corner of H5 and H6 chipped with loss of one page number and a portion of the rest, and small hole in blank fore-margin of I1, due to an original paper flaw; small hole in blank lower margin of C2 in volume three, due to an original paper flaw; small single worm-hole through blank upper fore-corner of roughly the last third of volume four, with more extensive worming of last nine leaves, and consequent small chip to blank upper fore-corner of last two leaves and end-papers; otherwise a very nice copy. Each volume with the ownership inscription and armorial bookplate of Sir Joseph Sawle Graves Sawle, Bart. In this copy leaf L12 in volume three is a cancel as almost always, with the revised text in the middle of the second paragraph on p.227. This passage occurs in the ‘Memoirs of A Lady of Quality’ which their authoress, Frances Anne, Viscountess Vane, paid Smollett to insert: the alteration probably being made at her request. P.134 in volume two is mis-paged 144, p.279 in volume three is mispaged 297, and pp.304-5: probably as always. Chapter LXVII in volume two contains an early reference to signage. CBEL, II, p.524; NCBEL, 2: 963; ESTC, T55344; Block, p.221; Rothschild, 1910, not recording the final blanks in volumes two and three. The second edition (of 1758) had an extensively revised and altered text. All books listed by Robert Temple are first editions unless otherwise stated.

$1096.13

Next >