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DÉCRET DE LA CONVENTION NATIONALE, DU 18e. JOUR DE PLUVIÔSE, AN SECOND DE LA RÉPUBLIQUE FRANÇAISE, UNE & INDIVISIBLE. QUI NOMME LES MEMBRES DE LA COMMISSION TEMPORAIRE DES ARTS, & DESIGNE LES INVENTAIRES DONT ILS SERONT RESPECTIVEMENT CHARGÉS
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DÉCRET DE LA CONVENTION NATIONALE, DU 18e. JOUR DE PLUVIÔSE, AN SECOND DE LA RÉPUBLIQUE FRANÇAISE, UNE & INDIVISIBLE. QUI NOMME LES MEMBRES DE LA COMMISSION TEMPORAIRE DES ARTS, & DESIGNE LES INVENTAIRES DONT ILS SERONT RESPECTIVEMENT CHARGÉS

By [French Collections]

Orléans, France: L. P. Couret, 1794. Bifolium. Very good.. Small quarto. Bifolium, 4 pp. 3/4-inch of loss at upper corner (with no loss to text). Soft early horizontal fold. Very minor foxing. Very good. The 1794 French Revolutionary decree transferring the former royal collections of scientific, technological, and artistic objects to newly designated state inventories, naming the commissioners of each to form the new “commission temporaire des Arts.” Forty-three commissioners and twelve categories of objects are named, offering a highly informative view of cultural authority and material taxonomy at the height of the Revolution. Almost immediately upon the overthrow of the French monarchy in 1792, members of the National Convention embarked upon the urgent and staggering task of protecting the massive royal collections and reorganizing them according to Republican and Enlightenment ideals. Within months, the famous Jardin du Roi and Cabinet d’Histoire Naturelle were newly established as the Muséum National d’Histoire Naturelle, and on August 10, 1793, the anniversary of Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette’s imprisonment, the Louvre palace opened for the first time as a public museum. The following February (Pluviôse II), the National Convention decreed in this document that a temporary commission of arts be established to “inventory and reunite in suitable depositories the books, instruments, machines and other objects of science and arts proper to the public instruction” and assigned forty-three leading scientists, engineers, artists, and craftsmen to the task. Among the commissioners inventorying the collections of natural history, botany, zoology, and mineralogy are the great naturalist Jean-Baptiste Lamarck and the veteran gardener of the Jardin du Roi, André Thouin. Other particularly notable names listed include the anatomist Honoré Fragonard, the famous watchmaker Antide Janvier (assigned to “instruments of physics, astronomy, and others”), the important Parisian printer Barrois, and the painter and landscape architect Hubert Robert (here, simply “Hubert”), who had narrowly escaped the guillotine a few months earlier. Additional categories of objects to be inventoried include maps, paintings, and sculptures, machines of war, antiquities and medals, maps, chemical laboratories, musical instruments “ancient, foreign, or the most rare in their perfection among the known and modern,” and various others. The present copy of the decree is a departmental printing, containing a printed acknowledgment of the decree by the authorities of the department of Loiret in its capital, Orléans, signed 25 days after the decree was issued, on 13 Ventôse of the second year of the Republic (March 3, 1794). OCLC lists three copies. Scarce.

$500.00

SATURDAY LECTURES. No. 8. HOW WE SEE. A LECTURE DELIVERED IN THE NATIONAL MUSEUM, WASHINGTON, D.C., APRIL 29, 1882
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SATURDAY LECTURES. No. 8. HOW WE SEE. A LECTURE DELIVERED IN THE NATIONAL MUSEUM, WASHINGTON, D.C., APRIL 29, 1882

By Burnett, Swan M.

[Washington, D. C.]: Judd & Detweiler, 1882. First Edition. Softcover. Very good. [1882] 25 pp. Original printed self-wrappers, stitched. Inscribed, "Compliments of the Author," and institutional numerical inscription on title page. Early vertical fold. Uneven toning in title page. Overall very good. Scarce work by an important American opthalmologist. Swan Moses Burnett (1847-1906) was the first professor of opthalmology at Georgetown University; he was also anoted collected of art and books. His first wife was Frances Hodgson Burnett, author of THE SECRET GARDEN and LITTLE LORD FAUNTLEROY. The two divorced in 1898. OCLC locates one copy of this lecture, at the Smithsonian.

$75.00

ROBERT NESBITTS OSTEOGENIE ODER ABHANDLUNG VON ERZEUGUNG DER KNOCHEN IM MENSCHLICHEN KÖRPER IN ZWEEN VORLESUNGEN ERKLÄRT, DIE AUF DEM ANATOMISCHEN THEATER DER WUNDÄRZTE IN LONDON DEN ERSTEN UND ANDERN DES HEUMONATS, IM JAHR 1731. GEHALTEN WORDEN . . .
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ROBERT NESBITTS OSTEOGENIE ODER ABHANDLUNG VON ERZEUGUNG DER KNOCHEN IM MENSCHLICHEN KÖRPER IN ZWEEN VORLESUNGEN ERKLÄRT, DIE AUF DEM ANATOMISCHEN THEATER DER WUNDÄRZTE IN LONDON DEN ERSTEN UND ANDERN DES HEUMONATS, IM JAHR 1731. GEHALTEN WORDEN . . .

By Nesbitt, Robert; Johann Ernst Greding (trans.)

Altenburg: Paul Emanuel Richters, 1753. First German-language edition. Hardcover. Good. Quarto. [8],xxviii,[4],104 pp. plus six folding plates. In German. Contemporary three-quarter leather and speckled paper over boards. 19th-century ex-dono inscription in title page and occasional 19th-century marginal notes in German. Spine and nearly all leather perished, joints cracked. 2 x 2 cm. square excision in front free endpaper. Very light occasional foxing, else near fine internally. Overall good. The German translation of Robert Nesbitt's best known work, HUMAN OSTEOGENY EXPLAINED IN TWO LECTURES, first published in London in 1736. Robert Nesbitt (1697-1761) trained at Leiden University under Bernhardus Albinus the Elder (1653-1721) and Herman Boerhaave, the "Dutch Hippocrates" (1668-1738). An Englishman, Nesbitt returned to London after his studies and commenced his medical career; he was admitted as a fellow to the College of Physicians in 1729. The present work comprises two lectures he delivered at the Anatomical Theatre of the Surgeons of London in 1731, in which he demonstrated, for the first time, that bones in the human fetus were generated in both cartilage and membrane. The illustrations on six folding leaves, here engraved by Johann Christian Gottfried Fritzsch (ca. 1720 - 1802), were the first accurately to show the full course of human bone genesis. This edition scarce, with OCLC recording nine copies (all in Europe).

$550.00

L'USAGE DES GLOBES CELESTES ET TERRESTRES, ET DES SPHERES, SUIVANT LES DIFFERENS SYSTEMES DU MONDE. PRÉCEDÉ D'UN TRAITÉ DE COSMOGRAPHIE, OÙ EST EXPLIQUÉ AVEC ORDRE TOUT CE QU'IL Y A PLUS CURIEUX DANS LA DESCRIPTION DE L'UNIVERS, SUIVANT LES MEMOIRES & OBSERVATIONS DES PLUS HABILES ASTRONOMES & GEOGRAPHES. . .
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L'USAGE DES GLOBES CELESTES ET TERRESTRES, ET DES SPHERES, SUIVANT LES DIFFERENS SYSTEMES DU MONDE. PRÉCEDÉ D'UN TRAITÉ DE COSMOGRAPHIE, OÙ EST EXPLIQUÉ AVEC ORDRE TOUT CE QU'IL Y A PLUS CURIEUX DANS LA DESCRIPTION DE L'UNIVERS, SUIVANT LES MEMOIRES & OBSERVATIONS DES PLUS HABILES ASTRONOMES & GEOGRAPHES. . .

By Bion, Nicolas

Paris: Chez l'auteur... Laurent d'Houry... Jean Boudot, libraire..., 1699. First Edition. Hardcover. Near fine. 12mo. [18],300;112 pp. plus 26 plates (three folding). Contemporary speckled calf, spine richly gilt, gilt leather label, raised bands, edges rouged. Light institutional inkstamp in title page. 18th-century inscription in titlepage and signature of Theophile Leonard in title page and final page of the dedication. Occasional 18th-century marginalia. Minor wear. Near fine. First edition of the first major work of Nicolas Bion, complete with 26 plates of terrestrial and celestial maps, diagrams, and images of globes. Bion (ca. 1652-1733) was a Paris-based cosmographer and maker of mathematical and astronomical instruments, holding the title of "king's engineer for mathematical instruments" under Louis XIV (DSB II, pp. 132-1330). A landmark in its field.

$1100.00

DE TELLURIBUS IN MUNDO NOSTRO SOLARI, QUAE VOCANTUR PLANETAE: ET DE TELLURIBUS IN COELO ASTRIFERO: DEQUE ILLARUM INCOLIS; TUM DE SPIRITIBUS & ANGELIS IBI; EX AUDITIS & VISIS
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DE TELLURIBUS IN MUNDO NOSTRO SOLARI, QUAE VOCANTUR PLANETAE: ET DE TELLURIBUS IN COELO ASTRIFERO: DEQUE ILLARUM INCOLIS; TUM DE SPIRITIBUS & ANGELIS IBI; EX AUDITIS & VISIS

By [Swedenborg, Emanuel]

London: [John Lewis], 1758. First Edition. Hardcover. Very good. Quarto. 72 pp. Errata leaf not present, as usual. In Latin. Late 19th-century red morocco, raised bands, gilt spine title, inner gilt dentelles, marbled endpapers, a.e.g. Mid 19th-century ownership inscription in title page and underlining and extensive marginal notes in English and Latin from the same owner at various points throughout. Some loss to manuscript marginalia from trimming. Minor wear and soiling to binding and occasional soiling and foxing in contents. Very good. First edition, in Latin, of one of Swedenborg's early mystical writings, published anonymously by John Lewis in London in an edition of 1000 copies. This work, later published in English as "Concerning the Earths in our Solar System, which are called Planets; and concerning the Earths in the Starry Heaven; together with an account of their inhabitants, and also of the spirits and angels there..." is an account of Swedenborg's spiritual communications with the inhabitants of other worlds and a description of their various distinctive qualities and religious orientations. The spirits of Mercury travel across the universe in globe-like phalanxes "to acquire the knowledges of things." Describing to Swedenborg the vast numbers of beings and worlds beyond our own, they relate to him that "they knew there were earths existing in the universe to the number of some hundred thousands and upwards" and ask, "yet what is this to the Divine, which is infinite?" The inhabitants of Mars are "the best of all among the spirits who are from the earths of our solar system, for they are as to the most part celestial men, not unlike those who were of the Most Ancient Church on this earth." At the edge of our solar system, Swedenborg discovers "fiery smoke ascending out of a great chasm," where guards prevent the travel of spirits to whom leave has not been granted, and visits five worlds beyond it. An additional chapter explores the question of why our earth would be chosen for the Incarnation, determining that the capacity to create scripture began here: "That the Word might be written on our earth, is because the art of writing has existed here from the most ancient time, first on the bark of trees, next on parchment, afterwards on paper, and lastly published by types. This was provided by the Lord for the sake of the Word." Throughout, Swedenborg's considerable astronomical knowledge and distinctive theology emerge in his narration and in dialogues between himself and the other beings. ESTC T90963. Hyde 956. Caillet 10482 (French translation).

$900.00

TWELVE LECTURES ON COMPARATIVE EMBRYOLOGY, DELIVERED BEFORE THE LOWELL INSTITUTE, IN BOSTON, DECEMBER AND JANUARY, 1848-9. . .
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TWELVE LECTURES ON COMPARATIVE EMBRYOLOGY, DELIVERED BEFORE THE LOWELL INSTITUTE, IN BOSTON, DECEMBER AND JANUARY, 1848-9. . .

By Agassiz, Louis

New York: Dewitt & Davenport, 1849. First Separate Edition. Softcover. Good. 104,4 pp. including numerous in-text illustrations. Original printed wrappers. Rear wrapper lacking. Front wrapper moderately soiled and abraded, spine chipped, edges worn. Internally clean. Good.

$50.00