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illustrator Information

If you're looking for information on book illustrators and their works, you've found the right place.


Alice and Martin Provensen

Whether you recognize their names or not, you are probably quite familiar with the work of the illustrating team of Alice and Martin Provensen. Together, the couple illustrated more than 40 children’s books, including Little Golden Books.

Alice Provensen was born on  August 14, 1917 in Chicago, Illinois, but moved with her family to California when she was twelve. After attending both the Art Institute of Chicago and the University of California, Alice was employed...


Aubrey Beardsley

Aubrey Beardsley (1872-1898) was an English artist who became a leading figure in the Aesthetic movement and a significant contributor to the development of Art Nouveau. Beardsley's only professional instruction was a few evening classes at the Westminister School of Art in 1892, provoked by his meeting with artist Sir Edward Burne-Jones. Later that same year, Beardsley travelled to Paris, where he discovered what would become two of his major influences: the poster art of...


Barry Moser

After having been educated at Auburn University and the University of Tennessee in his hometown of Chattanooga, Barry Moser (b. 1940) moved to New England around 1967 and began teaching at The Williston Academy in Easthampton, Massachusetts. Though he was trained in painting, Moser took a new interest in etching and wood engraving around this time and soon devoted himself to learning, and later teaching, the crafts. However, in Moser's first commission, Vernon Ahmadjian's...


Edmund Dulac

Edmund Dulac (1882-1953) was one of the great figures from the Golden Age of Illustration. Born in Toulouse, France, Dulac showed artistic talent in his early teens. Many of these efforts were in watercolor, a medium he would favor through most of his life. Dulac studied studied law at the University of Toulouse, and then, after becoming bored with law and having won an award at the école des Beaux-Arts, decided to study art full-time...


Edward Gorey

A large influence on the works of artists like Tim Burton, Edward Gorey (1925-2000) became an iconic figure of the Goth subculture. Born and raised in Chicago, Gorey studied art for only one semester at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago in 1943 and then attended Harvard University from 1946 to 1950. In 1953, Gorey moved to New York City and landed a job in the art department of publisher Doubleday, illustrating book...


Eric Gill

Eric Gill (1882-1840) studied at Chichester Technical and Art School before moving to London in 1900 to train as an architect with W.D. Caroe. Soon frustrated with his training, Gill took evening classes, both in stonemasonry at Westminster Technical Institute and in calligraphy at the Central School of Arts and Crafts. By 1903, Gill gave up his architectural training to become a calligrapher, letter-cutter, and monumental mason. The next year, he married Ethel Hester Moore....


Gustave Dore

Though he primarily worked with wood engraving, Gustave Doré (1832-1883) was an artist, illustrator, sculptor. Believed to be a child prodigy, Doré was carving his own lithographic stones at the age of 12, making sets of engravings with stories to go with them. At age 15, Doré's first book was published by Charles Philipon, a satire titled The Labours of Hercules (1847). The book-written, drawn, and engraved all entirely by Doré-is now extremely rare. Later...


Ludwig Bemelmans

Author and illustrator Ludwig Bemelmans (1898-1962) is best known as the creator of the Madeline series of children’s books. The son of a troubled family, Bemelmans was born in Austria, lived for a time in Germany, and moved to New York in 1914 after a scrape with the law. Bemelmans seems to have been something of an eccentric. In addition to working as hotelier at various times throughout his life, he briefly owned a Parisian...


Quentin Blake

Quentin Blake (b. 1932) is an English illustrator and children's writer. Born in outside of London, Blake went to Chislehurst and Sidcup Grammar School, where there is now a Quentin Blake Art Building. Having drawn since he was five, Blake's first published drawing appeared in Punch magazine when he was just sixteen years old. Blake served two years in the Royal Army Educational Corps, during which he illustrated English Parade, a booklet to help soldiers...


R. Crumb

The art of American cartoonist Robert Crumb (b. 1943) displays a distinctive style and satirical tone towards contemporary American culture. Growing up as one of five children with a physically and verbally abusive father and a mentally unstable mother, Crumb spent much time drawing as a kid. He was closest with his older brother Charles and the two often produced their own comics. In the late '50s, young Robert discovered Mad magazine and later Humbug,...


Ralph Steadman

Ralph Steadman (b. 1936) has drawn everything from political caricatures to wine and beer labels to extinct birds, all in his own distinct style. An organic tangle of ink blotches and lines, Steadman’s art famously distorts the subject, while also revealing them in a new way. Born in Wallesey, Liverpool, Steadman’s first job was with De Havilland Aircraft Company as an apprentice aircraft engineer, but he soon found that he could not settle in to...


Rockwell Kent

Born to a privileged family in Tarrytown, New York, Rockwell Kent (1882-1971) was granted the opportunity to attended several of the top private schools on the east coast during his youth. He first studied painting during the summer of 1900 under William Merritt Chase while attending the Columbia University School of Architecture. Just prior to his senior year at Columbia, Kent dropped out and enrolled full time at the New York School of Art, where...




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