The Gentle Grace of Faith in A Wrinkle in Time

With the cinematic adaptation of Madeline L’Engle’s seminal work A Wrinkle in Time soon premiering, it’s worth examining the aspect of the book that has made the novel a frequent guest on banned books lists. In short: it really confused and challenged conservative Christians. And I got to witness it all firsthand. In the late 90’s, I went to a very small, very conservative evangelical Christian school, and the religious instruction was more fire and brimstone than love, peace, and … Continued


Biblio plays Biblios!

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Amber is the current marketing coordinator at Biblio. A lifelong love of the written word brought her to Biblio and she happily spends her days talking about books and delving into the wide world of antiquarian books.

You can also find her in the garden or writing about brewing and plant adventures at Pixie’s Pocket.


Nina Simone

Born Eunice Kathleen Waymon on February 21st, 1933 in Tryon NC, Nina Simone was the sixth of eight children. She started playing piano by ear at the age of 3, and church organ by 7. She dreamed of becoming the first black concert pianist in the United States and gathered supporters in her small North Carolina town. During her first recital at 12 years old, Simone took a stand against the racial injustices of the Jim Crow South and refused … Continued


Cool Things Found Inside of Books

One of the best parts of older books, in my opinion, has always been the possibility of finding things wedged in between the pages: sometimes used as an impromptu bookmark, some stuffed there to hide, some shuffled in by accident. There’s just something a little bit magical about it. I was recently rearranging my bookshelves (alphabetically by author of course, which had fallen to disarray since our big move), when I happened across a call to arms from my best … Continued


The Politics of Middle Earth

the politics of middle earth - a blog for #hobbitday at biblio.com

 

I, unlike many self-proclaimed nerdy kids my age, didn’t properly get to meet and make friends with Bilbo, Frodo, and the gang until I was in college. Sure, sure, I’d gone to midnight premiers for the Lord of the Rings movies with gaggles of friends, but I didn’t dress up like Gandalf and I sure as heck didn’t know a single phrase in the Elven tongue. I thought Silmarillion was the type of metal from which Bilbo’s chain-mail shirt was made.

That changed in college, though. I went to a small women’s liberal arts school, where the month-long winter term was usually a way to get some of our required credits out of the way in the most ridiculous manner possible. Loads of my friends were off traveling to Mexico, Tunisia, or London. I would have been bummed about not going abroad, but the week we were to sign up for our January Term courses, a friend told me about two classes that totally out-shadowed all those exotic adventures: a music history course centered on The Beatles and a political science course lovingly named The Politics of Middle-Earth. (more…)

Pru is a North Carolina native, transplanted to the bustling base of South Carolina’s tiny share of the Blue Ridge Mountains, where she tag-teams with her husband to herd two brilliant boys and two cats.

When she’s not busy blogging with Biblio or toiling over original works, you can most likely find her speeding around in the mountains, blasting egregiously loud music and singing off-key.

Despite being fresh in the bookselling scene, she’s been a insatiable reader since forever, and will point you to her love for Oscar Wilde and Jane Austen, while tucking Neil Gaiman and Douglas Adams behind her back and shushing them. Honestly, she’ll read anything you put in front of her. Help support her writing career via Patreon


Explaining it all: Encyclopaedia Britannica

encyclopaedia britannica, eleventh edition
Listed by Digital Editions on Biblio
Encyclopaedia Britannica, Eleventh Edition on Biblio.com
Listed by Digital Editions on Biblio

In a recent article for the Chicago Tribune,  Donald Liebenson takes a look at the new book Everything Explained That Is Explainable by Denis Boyles.

The book is about the Eleventh Edition of the Encyclopaedia Britannica. This acclaimed edition of the encyclopaedia was published in 1910-1911, and was made up of over 44 million words bound in 29 volumes. It is considered the bar by which scholarly reference books are measured.

Liebenson was kind enough to mention in his article that Biblio has copies of this edition for sale. It is true! The specific listing they mentioned is from the bookseller Digital Editions in New Jersey. The complete 29 volume set comes with it’s own lovely, vertical case. As the bookseller describes in their listing, this edition is “The ultimate encyclopedic reference for the historian (or any other scholar who wishes to discover the “state of knowledge” in his or her specialty before 1910.”

The case is included in the listing, as well as a buckram-bound “Reader’s Guide” – all for the price of $10,850.00 USD.

Resources:

Check out the listing and it’s full description here.

Here’s ALL of the eleventh edition of the Encyclopaedia Britannica on Biblio at this time.

Read the full article about the book on the Chicago Tribune here.

Amber is the current marketing coordinator at Biblio. A lifelong love of the written word brought her to Biblio and she happily spends her days talking about books and delving into the wide world of antiquarian books.

You can also find her in the garden or writing about brewing and plant adventures at Pixie’s Pocket.


National Poetry Month 2016

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April is National Poetry Month.

Across the United States, you will find teachers, librarians, poets, authors, and lovers of the written word engaging in events and celebrations relating to poetic pursuits. (more…)

Amber is the current marketing coordinator at Biblio. A lifelong love of the written word brought her to Biblio and she happily spends her days talking about books and delving into the wide world of antiquarian books.

You can also find her in the garden or writing about brewing and plant adventures at Pixie’s Pocket.


Biblio will be attending the Florida Antiquarian Book Fair!

florida antiquarian book fair as seen on biblio.com
Biblio is proud to be a sponsor for the 34th Annual Florida Antiquarian Book Fair!

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Amber is the current marketing coordinator at Biblio. A lifelong love of the written word brought her to Biblio and she happily spends her days talking about books and delving into the wide world of antiquarian books.

You can also find her in the garden or writing about brewing and plant adventures at Pixie’s Pocket.


The Catcher in the Rye is Salinger’s Worst Book

I Roll my Eyes at The Catcher in the Rye

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Even the horse is unimpressed.

Unfortunately, the first thing I think about these days when I hear The Catcher in the Rye is the film Chasing Amy, that barely post-adolescent flick, created by barely post-adolescent filmmaker Kevin Smith, with Ben Affleck playing the main character – named Holden, of course.  The next thing I think about is a guy I knew in high school who was one of the most socially awkward people I ever met, and carried a small leather bound copy of that book on his person at all times. His obsession with that novel did not appear to improve his social problems.  I guess The Catcher in the Rye is just one of those things that mean so much to a certain type of person, at a certain point in their lives, that it’s almost sacred.  Like ABBA, or Blossom.  Or Pearl Jam.  But I’m certainly not here to mock Pearl Jam.  I’m here to mock The Catcher in the Rye, and all it’s very satisfying and entertaining discontent, swearing, and overall hatred of everybody who is not a maladjusted child of wealthy parents who provide very little emotionally to their kids.  Maybe I just don’t understand because I’m not a boy.  If that’s the case, I feel pretty sorry for boys, especially the ones who are so good at recognizing hypocrisy in others that they just can’t contain themselves, and go out and do all the self destructive things they can find to do. (more…)


Some Thoughts on Lord of the Rings

From the Movies to the Books

I just finished reading Lord of the Rings for the first time last weekend, and I had a few thoughts and random observations to share. I know there are a ton of Tolkien fans out there, and many of them will vehemently disagree with many or most of my assessments. Disagreement is fine, even vehement disagreement, and you should post your thoughts below in the comments!

Before I begin, I want to provide some background. My first taste of Tolkien was the 1977 Rankin/Bass animated television special of The Hobbit. I was about seven or eight when I watched it, and it did not go well. Gollum scared me to tears and was the subject of a fun recurring nightmare that would last a few months. After that, I didn’t go near Tolkien until Peter Jackson’s adaptation of The Fellowship of the Ring came out in 2001. But that was it. Done–Game Over. I was a fan for life. I loved the movies and impatiently waited until the next one was released.

 

So, a decade since the last movie was released, I decided to finally sit down and read the actual book. I didn’t read the appendices and I haven’t read any other work by Tolkien yet. But here are my thoughts: (more…)