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Book reviews from BayShore

Wisconsin United States

Browse books offered for sale by BayShore Books LLC
Number of reviews: 45
Average review: star star star star

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The Timekeeper


Reviewed on Sep 14 2012

This fable about the meaning of time and its impact on our lives may be fiction, but the message is all too real. There are times in all our lives when we can relate to the teenager who believes time moves much too slowly; tonight can’t come fast enough, I wish the weekend would get here, why can’t it be summer? Or how fast time flies for the wealthy business man; when did I get so old, how can the kids be grown already, how much time do I have left? In his typical comfortable style, Mitch Albom reminds us what is important in our lives.

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Broken Harbor


Reviewed on Jul 24 2012

If you became a Tana French fan after reading In the Woods, she does not disappoint in Broken Harbor. If you felt unsatisfied at the ending of In the Woods, you won’t this time. You will keep guessing until the end as Detective Mick “Scorcher” Kennedy (last partnered with Frank Mackey in Faithful Place) and his rookie partner try and solve a horrific case involving two children and their father murdered as their mother barely hangs on.

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One Breath Away


Reviewed on Jun 27 2012

One Breath Away is the third novel by Heather Gudenkauf, and it may be the best yet! During a spring snowstorm an armed man holds a small town classroom hostage leaving us anxious to discover who and why. Written through the view point of five different characters add an element of drama and tension since the reader holds more knowledge than each character. This fast paced novel is highly recommended

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Before I Go To Sleep


Reviewed on Feb 14 2012

This is one of the few story lines that drew me in so completely it was difficult to think of anything else until the last word was read. The ending may not have been completely original, but the point of view of such a confused character helps the story unfold as if it were happening to the reader. Fantastic debut!

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Night Road


Reviewed on Feb 8 2012

Mothers beware! This is a horrifying read for any mother of teenagers. The first half of the book was absolutely heartbreaking. Sympathizing with Jude, it’s impossible to know how you would react under the same circumstances. After the tragedy, the story moved surprisingly fast and the ending was unconvincing, but I would still recommend this emotional read to fans of Kristin Hannah and those in need of a good cry.

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Faithful Place


Reviewed on Jul 6 2011

There is no shocking “ah ha moment” in Faithful Place and the story does not end with more questions than answers like In the Woods. In my mind the mystery is solved fairly early on, but the characters are what hooked me from the beginning and wouldn’t let go until the final page. Frank Mackey is trapped between the need to know the facts behind his first love’s disappearance and the desire to remain as far away as possible from his dysfunctional family. Tana French has a magical way of exploring the past and present and incorporating the rich dialect and customs of Dublin.

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Outside the Ordinary World

by Ostermiller, Dori


Reviewed on Aug 9 2010

In today?s reality affairs are not that uncommon, so truthfully I wasn?t expecting much from a story written about the subject. What makes this one so remarkable is the fact that the characters are complex, realistically flawed characters and their actions have real impact on those around them. This isn?t a story about a woman having an affair; it is the story of how one decision impacts her life as well as the lives of her spouse, children, parents, siblings, and those of her lover. Outside the Ordinary World is brilliantly written with enough love and humor to enthrall without being sappy

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Outside the Ordinary World

by Ostermiller, Dori


Reviewed on Aug 9 2010

In today?s reality affairs are not that uncommon, so truthfully I wasn?t expecting much from a story written about the subject. What makes this one so remarkable is the fact that the characters are complex, realistically flawed characters and their actions have real impact on those around them. This isn?t a story about a woman having an affair; it is the story of how one decision impacts her life as well as the lives of her spouse, children, parents, siblings, and those of her lover. Outside the Ordinary World is brilliantly written with enough love and humor to enthrall without being sappy

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Faithful Place: A Novel

by French, Tana


Reviewed on Aug 9 2010

There is no shocking ?ah ha moment? in Faithful Place and the story does not end with more questions than answers like In the Woods. In my mind the mystery is solved fairly early on, but the characters are what hooked me from the beginning and wouldn?t let go until the final page. Frank Mackey is trapped between the need to know the facts behind his first love?s disappearance and the desire to remain as far away as possible from his dysfunctional family. Tana French has a magical way of...more There is no shocking ?ah ha moment? in Faithful Place and the story does not end with more questions than answers like In the Woods. In my mind the mystery is solved fairly early on, but the characters are what hooked me from the beginning and wouldn?t let go until the final page. Frank Mackey is trapped between the need to know the facts behind his first love?s disappearance and the desire to remain as far away as possible from his dysfunctional family. Tana French has a magical way of exploring the past and present and incorporating the rich dialect and customs of Dublin.

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Sarah's Key


Reviewed on Jun 10 2010

This remarkable novel intertwines the past and the present beautifully. A powerful reminder of why we should never forget.

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A Reliable Wife

by Robert Goolrick


Reviewed on Apr 28 2010

The characters have so many layers, as you would expect to be required during a long Wisconsin winter. Beginning with a great dislike for all three, soon to understand them each a bit more and finally to feel the compassion that you can only feel for those who have struggled to survive. Reading reviews of a Reliable Wife shows the depth and feeling invoked from the novel, as many negative as positive, and in my mind this is a true sign of great writing

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Olive Kitteridge

by Elizabeth Strout


Reviewed on Apr 28 2010

Olive Kitteridge is one book I honestly had no interest in reading. I typically stay away from short stories, preferring a novel I can really sink my teeth into. Our book club chose this so I thought I would give it a chance and am I glad I did! Olive is a very complex character and through the eyes of the townspeople we get to know her in a way that would have been impossible otherwise. Her story is one filled with hurt, anger, and compassion. Beautifully written with a touch of humor. The interview with author and character is not to be missed!

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Girl With Skirt of Stars

by Jennifer Kitchell


Reviewed on Apr 28 2010

The Navajo culture is deeply rooted in this poetic story of mystery and deceit. Fans of Tony Hillerman may find a new favorite.

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The Art of Racing in the Rain

by Garth Stein


Reviewed on Apr 28 2010

Plenty of heart and humor. I was hooked from the first page.

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Pingo

by Brandon Bull


Reviewed on Apr 28 2010

The adventures of Chad and his imaginary friend Pingo will have kids laughing out loud. When he becomes too old for imaginary friends, Chad says his goodbyes to Pingo who will not be swept away so easily. As an old man, Chad is ready to revisit his childhood and once again accepts Pingo in his life. Humorous and heartwarming!

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Have a Little Faith

by Mitch Albom


Reviewed on Oct 2 2009

Mitch Alboms first non-fiction since Tuesdays with Morrie does not disappoint. It starts with a request from his childhood rabbi that Albom deliver his Eulogy. Needing a deeper understanding of the man behind the mission, he is brought back to the world of faith he left behind years ago. Albom also meets a convict turned pastor and soon realizes there are more similarities between Christian and Jewish faith than he thought possible. This is not a book about religion, but about the comfort of finding something to believe in.

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The Lace Reader

by Brunonia Barry


Reviewed on Sep 24 2009

Beautifully written, poignant and intriguing. Each word is woven like a delicate thread into this powerful novel by Brunonia Barry. History, romance, and mystery in a perfect blend to create the most compelling read of the year.

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Glass

by Ellen Hopkins


Reviewed on May 7 2009

"Glass", like its namesake, is addictive, impossible to forget and has me craving more.

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On the Divinity of Second Chances

by Kaya McLaren


Reviewed on May 6 2009

For a novel told from so many different perspectives, I didn't find this the least bit confusing. Each character is so vividly quirky; it is not hard to tell them apart. Unlike many other fictional stories, I cannot name anyone in real life that is anything like this family, but I wish I could! They are loving and funny and have very strong personalities. I found myself laughing out loud and sharing different passages with family and friends. I highly recommend On the Divinity of Second Chances for anyone looking for words of wisdom or just a good laugh.

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Sail

by James Patterson, Howard Roughan


Reviewed on May 6 2009

"Sail" is another great summer read by James Patterson along with Howard Roughan. Although there is no mystery to the story, there is enough action and adventure to keep the pages turning.

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If I Stay

by Gayle Forman


Reviewed on May 2 2009

Read in one sitting, this story will remain with me for a long time. I am glad I didn't read any reviews or descriptions of the book beforehand. The shock of the accident swept me into the story immediately. Gayle Forman is brilliant with character development and rousing strong emotion without being sappy. I absolutely loved "If I Stay" and I'm sure I won't be the only one.

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Lottery

by Patricia Wood


Reviewed on Mar 24 2009

Our book club has a new favorite! We spent two hours discussing Lottery and picking out our favorite lines to read aloud. It was an evening filled with tears and laughter. The characters are so real that we could all relate to at least one of them. Having the story told from Perry�s point of view added depth and insight. I found myself envying his simplistic way of seeing the world. To not feel the anger and bitterness that I felt toward his family would be a blessing. As a first novel, this will be hard to beat, but I hope Patricia Wood gives it a try.

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Watch Me

by Brenda Novak


Reviewed on Mar 2 2009

Great light read for any suspense enthusiasts. It is the third book in a series; however, the first I read and I didn't feel lost.

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The Madonnas of Leningrad

by Debra Dean


Reviewed on Oct 17 2008

A beautiful story about a woman lost in the present while her mind is haunted by the past. Wonderfully descriptive recollections of the artwork at the Hermitage Museum give hope during the siege of Leningrad. “The Madonnas of Leningrad” perfectly intersects the life of a young Russian woman during World War II with the life of the same as an elderly woman gripped by Alzheimer's. An unforgettable first novel.

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The Story of Edgar Sawtelle

by Not Available


Reviewed on Oct 17 2008

I feel as if I am in mourning today. For Edgar and Almondine. For the unfortunate end of their story. A story filled with such passion and fury and loneliness and longing. A story I foolishly believed would come to it’s conclusion long after I lost interest and was ready to read the happily ever after and move on to the next. There is no moving on from Edgar Sawtelle. He will be with me now for the rest of my days. I can only envy David Wroblewski who completed his life’s purpose with depth and beauty

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Someone Like You

by Sarah Dessen


Reviewed on Jul 7 2008

“Someone Like You” is a story of the bond of friendship and how important that is, especially in the lives of teenage girls. There is a time in every girl’s life when she begins to pull away from her mother and turns to friends for that guidance and acceptance. Sarah Dessen really understands the pressures of being a teenager including school, jobs, peer pressure and home life. This is a story any teenage girl will be able to relate to.

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Rich Dad, Poor Dad

by Robert T. Kiyosaki, Sharon L. Lechter


Reviewed on Jun 25 2008

“Rich Dad Poor Dad” is a book that makes you want to get up and take charge of your life. It is not a “get rich quick” book nor does it tell you step by step how to accomplish this. There is definitely some helpful advice and ways of looking at things in a whole new light – like your house as a liability rather than an asset – but it is up to you to find the path to financial freedom. Robert Kiyosaki is there to motivate and guide you. An excellent read for anyone who has finally had enough of the “rat race”.

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Sail

by James Patterson, Howard Roughan


Reviewed on Jun 23 2008

“Sail” is another great summer read by James Patterson along with Howard Roughan. Although there is no mystery to the story, there is enough action and adventure to keep the pages turning.

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The Earth, My Butt, And Other Big Round Things

by Carolyn MacKler


Reviewed on Jun 20 2008

Virginia Shreves just doesn’t measure up. She doesn’t fit in with the pencil thin popular girls and certainly not with her picture perfect family. Then she realizes everyone else may not be as perfect as they seem. Rather than change herself to fit the perfect mold that society has created, she discovers that she only needs to learn to accept herself. “The Earth, My Butt, & Other Big Round Things” is a realistic coming-of-age story with the humor and spunk today’s teens can relate to.

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Can You Keep a Secret?

by Sophie Kinsella


Reviewed on Jun 18 2008

“Can You Keep a Secret” is another hilarious novel from the author of the Shopaholic series. Light, fun, and completely entertaining.

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Searching for Paradise in Parker, PA

by Kris Radish


Reviewed on May 19 2008

“Searching for Paradise” encourages readers to reexamine their relationships and life choices. Are you happy? What are your dreams? More importantly, what are you going to do about it? We may not all go to the same extremes as Addy and Lucky to reinvent ourselves and our lives; however these characters bring enough humor and emotion to keep the pages turning.

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Crank

by Ellen Hopkins


Reviewed on May 2 2008

This account of how quickly an average teen can be thrust into a world of drugs was a real eye opener. As a parent, it’s easy to think “not my child” and I am sure Kristina felt that way about herself before “Bree” took over. The way this book is written, in verse, creates a powerfully dramatic narrative. Although this may be a quick read, a story within a story is discovered by reading down the columns. I would recommend this book to every teen and parent.

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Sundays at Tiffany's

by James Patterson, Gabrielle Charbonnet


Reviewed on Apr 28 2008

James Patterson is known for his mysteries such as the Cross series and the Women’s murder club. “Sundays at Tiffany’s” is a love story resembling the likes of Nicholas Sparks, a love which knows no boundaries and can withstand the test of time. This novel surpasses “Sam's Letters to Jennifer” and comes in a close second behind “Suzanne's Diary for Nicholas”.

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Critical Choices That Change Lives

by Daniel R. Castro


Reviewed on Apr 19 2008

No book has inspired me or change my outlook on life more than "Critical Choices That Change Lives". This is a great book for teenagers, too. It helps them to realize how the choices they make affects not only their lives but so many others and why the "decision behind the decision" is the most important decision they will ever make. It also explains the three critical choices that turn ordinary people into heroes. This is a must read for anyone facing obstacles or difficult

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A Great and Terrible Beauty

by Libba Bray


Reviewed on Apr 19 2008

“A Great and Terrible Beauty” may have been written as a novel for teens; however, the historical setting, mystery, fantasy, and touch of romance are just as appealing for adults. Libba Bray masterfully explains the trials and tribulations for women in the Victorian era and relates the characters to modern life.

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The Friday Night Knitting Club


Reviewed on Apr 19 2008

“No, everyone has to knit when they’re here. I promise you. But not every person has to use yarn.” This favorite sentence from “The Friday Night Knitting Club” is the essence of what this story is about. Six very diverse women become unlikely friends as their lives begin to unravel faster than the sweater pattern they attempt to knit during their Friday night meetings. Bonds form, secrets are shared, and hearts are exposed as these women get to know each other as well as themselves. Knowledge of knitting is not a requirement for this story of strength and friendship.

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Duma Key

by Stephen King


Reviewed on Apr 19 2008

When I think of Stephen King, I think horror and sleepless nights. Imagine my surprise to discover his latest novel is actually a memoir – not that of the masterful storyteller, but of a simple Minnesota construction worker who is, shall we say, a little down on his luck. Okay, maybe it’s not a true story, but I feel so connected to the characters, they must exist somewhere. Edgar Freemantle, or “Eddie” as I now think of him, lost his right arm in a construction accident and his marriage ends. Instead of giving up on life as he originally intended, he takes his psychologist’s advice of a “geographic cure” and rents a house on Duma Key off the Florida Coast.

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The Looking Glass Wars

by Frank Beddor


Reviewed on Apr 19 2008

This is one of the most fantastically imaginative books I have read in a long time. I was completely hooked after the prologue unveiled “Alice’s Adventures Underground” by Lewis Carroll and the devastation this caused the real Alyss. Frank Beddor has done a remarkable job weaving this “true” version of Wonderland through the beloved fairy tale.

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Astrid & Veronika

by Linda Olsson


Reviewed on Apr 19 2008

This is a love story like no other - not a romantic love, but the love between two unlikely friends. Beautifully written

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The Almost Moon

by Alice Sebold


Reviewed on Apr 19 2008

After reading the first chapter of "The Almost Moon" I thought there was no way I was going to be able to finish this book. How can I possibly connect with a character who murders her mother in the very first sentence? Boy, was I wrong! I read a few reviews where the reviewer states they couldn't even finish the book. Finish it! It will be worth your time. By the end I felt Helen’s pain and was able to empathize with her. Alice Sebold does an amazing job of bringing the characters to life. No, this is not an easy read. The subject matter is difficult and controversial, but if you are looking for a deep thought provoking read, this is it.

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The Brief History of the Dead

by Kevin Brockmeier


Reviewed on Apr 19 2008

Brilliant! The only book in recent memory which has me anxiously awaiting the death of the main character. It still has me thinking long after the last page was turned.

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Let's Get Ready for Kindergarten!

by Linda Desimowich, Stacey Kannenberg


Reviewed on Apr 19 2008

What a perfect learning tool for parents and teachers! I was shocked at how much is expected in Kindergarten, but everything your child will learn is outlined in this colorful and fun book. Kids can practice the alphabet, shapes, colors, counting and so much more using this kid friendly book with a dry erase marker. "Let's Get Ready For First Grade" will prepare them for the next year.

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Brinda's Promise

by K. C. Berg


Reviewed on Apr 19 2008

I read the first in the series simply because it was written by a local author. I was pleasantly surprised by the entertaining story line and believable characters. By the end I was anxiously awaiting the sequel, which is fantastic! Plenty of action and romance to keep the pages turning late into the night.

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