Book Review: Before the Fall by Noah Hawley [spoiler alert and language warning]

On a foggy summer night, eleven people — ten privileged, one down-on-his-luck painter — depart Martha’s Vineyard on a private jet headed for New York. Sixteen minutes later, the unthinkable happens: the plane plunges into the ocean. The only survivors are the painter Scott Burroughs and a four-year-old boy, who is now the last remaining member of an immensely wealthy and powerful media mogul’s family.

 

I’ve been on a bit of murder kick lately, so when Georgia Hardstock of the super-cool podcast My Favorite Murder recommended Noah Hawley’s Before the Fall, I eagerly grabbed a copy. This review will contain the big spoiler, so consider yourself warned. (more…)


Beloved Bears in Children’s Literature

Goofy and Lovable Bears are an Important Cornerstone in Children’s Literature There’s just something about bears. For an animal so potentially dangerous, they have become a staple in children’s literature. A given a quick glance over their representation in children’s books and it’s easy to understand why — they’re large, fluffy, and endearingly dopey. And for the last nearly 100 years, they have maintained a permanent presence in libraries and children’s bookshelves. We highlight some of the most well-known literary … Continued


The Gentle Grace of Faith in A Wrinkle in Time

With the cinematic adaptation of Madeline L’Engle’s seminal work A Wrinkle in Time soon premiering, it’s worth examining the aspect of the book that has made the novel a frequent guest on banned books lists. In short: it really confused and challenged conservative Christians. And I got to witness it all firsthand. In the late 90’s, I went to a very small, very conservative evangelical Christian school, and the religious instruction was more fire and brimstone than love, peace, and … Continued


Fire and Fury: Your Friendly Reminder to Search for Trump-Related Titles by ISBN, Not Title

With the recent surge of interest in Michael Wolff’s White House tell-all, Fire and Fury: Inside The Trump White House, we at Biblio have seen a spike in orders for a variety of books containing the phrase “fire and fury” in the title. But alas, readers are so eager to indulge in the gossip and stable ingenuity of the Trump White House that in their haste to order a copy of the tell-all, they are mistakenly ordering books like Fire … Continued



Tips on buying bulk religious materials on Biblio

If you are in the market for multiple Bibles or other religious instruction books, we have a couple of tips for your search. To start, it is most helpful to have an ISBN number for your desired book. All Bibles and books printed after 1970 will have an International Standard Book Number, otherwise known as an ISBN number. Since a unique ISBN is generated for each edition of a particular book, the ISBN is the best way to search for … Continued


Travelling the World with Ernest Hemingway

Miscellaneous materials relating to Hemingway's East African air safaris, from the collection of his pilot, Captain Roy Marsh
Miscellaneous materials relating to Hemingway’s East African air safaris, from the collection of his pilot, Captain Roy Marsh

by Ashleigh Redmond

 

From Idaho to Slovenia, my travels over the past six years have been, at least in part, inspired by Ernest Hemingway. My partner has had a healthy obsession with Hemingway since he was young, and we have been lucky enough to visit some of the most significant places in Hemingway’s life.

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The Works of Harper Lee

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Nelle Harper Lee was born in Monroeville, Alabama on April 28, 1926, and she passed away in her hometown earlier today, February 19, 2016.

Harper Lee was best known for the novel To Kill a Mockingbird, which was published in 1960. It was immediately successful, winning the Pulitzer Prize in 1961, and has become a classic of modern American literature.  She remained out of the public eye for decades afterwards, and did not publish anything else until 2015, a sequel to Mockingbird: Go Set a Watchman in 2015. (more…)


Diversity Dominates BookExpo America 2014

Authors Lead the Charge for More Diversity in Children’s Literature The 2014 BookExpo America convention was held this past weekend in New York City, and diversity in children and young adult fiction was the hot topic of discussion.  The nationwide conversation was jumpstarted by the Twitter hashtag #WeNeedDiverseBooks, first coined by authors disappointed when BookCon released the names of highlighted speakers at this year’s BookExpo, most of whom were white.  The announcement came at a time of increased scrutiny upon … Continued


Some Thoughts on Lord of the Rings

From the Movies to the Books

I just finished reading Lord of the Rings for the first time last weekend, and I had a few thoughts and random observations to share. I know there are a ton of Tolkien fans out there, and many of them will vehemently disagree with many or most of my assessments. Disagreement is fine, even vehement disagreement, and you should post your thoughts below in the comments!

Before I begin, I want to provide some background. My first taste of Tolkien was the 1977 Rankin/Bass animated television special of The Hobbit. I was about seven or eight when I watched it, and it did not go well. Gollum scared me to tears and was the subject of a fun recurring nightmare that would last a few months. After that, I didn’t go near Tolkien until Peter Jackson’s adaptation of The Fellowship of the Ring came out in 2001. But that was it. Done–Game Over. I was a fan for life. I loved the movies and impatiently waited until the next one was released.

 

So, a decade since the last movie was released, I decided to finally sit down and read the actual book. I didn’t read the appendices and I haven’t read any other work by Tolkien yet. But here are my thoughts: (more…)