The Book that Burns Women Alive

9781891396557.BX.0.m

Malleus Maleficarum- Montague Summers Translation
by Sprenger, Jakob

“All (Witchcraft) comes from carnal lust, which is in women insatiable.”– Malleus Maleficarum

The Hammer of Witches

If forced to choose any book to burn, I would burn Malleus Maleficarum (The Hammer of Witches). It seems appropriate, since the book caused so many women to burn at the stake.

First published in 1487, Malleus Maleficarum provided justification for the murder of thousands of women in medieval Europe. Spreading like the fire it encouraged, entire towns were left decimated by the witch trials that ensued. No book has been more damaging to the history of women than The Hammer of Witches.

Malleus Maleficarum is divided into three sections that confirms the existence of witchcraft, the evil of witches, and the prosecution of witches that will ensure their eradication. If The Hammer of Witches has a single theme, it is this: Women are naturally susceptible to the Devil’s evil, and that weakness stems from between their legs. (more…)


What Not to do to a Book: A Top Ten List

Water-damaged Book
Oh, this poor thing.

Books, especially old and antique books, can be finicky and temperamental. To keep your collection in pristine condition, be sure to avoid the following pitfalls of book ownership.

1. Do not expose to water or damp atmospheres

When wet or damp, pages quickly wrinkle and become brittle. In some cases, the ink can run and spill onto other pages.

 2. Do not place pressure on the binding

Age, quality, and use can all result in weakened binding, and undue pressure can cause pages to fall out and the binding to split.

 3. Do not subject to harsh or ultraviolet lights

Books with hand-drawn or fragile illustrations and platings can become dull when exposed too frequently to ultraviolet lights or camera flashes.
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Five Books to Terrify Annoying Children

Problem: You have been ambushed by your friends to babysit their kid on Friday night. They don’t want to pay a 15 year old $12 an hour, and you want to be nice, so you agree and refuse to take their money. After all, you are a good friend. However, there is just one little thing: you hate children. Well, you don’t hate them, you just really can’t stand them. Their grubby little hands freak you out, and they refuse to be quiet for more than twenty seconds when they show you how long they can hold their breath.

You may kind of hate kids after all.

Solution: To ensure that none of your friends will ever ask you to babysit their children again, just read them one of these super creepy kids books below. Trust me, after the parents come home to sobbing children who refuse to let go of their arms and insist on sleeping in the master bed for at least two weeks, you will never be asked to babysit again.

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Fools in Literature

The true origins of April Fool’s Day continues to be a mystery, but National Geographic offered this possible explanation: “Joseph Boskin, professor emeritus of American humor at Boston University, has offered his own interpretation of the holiday’s roots—as a prank.  In 1983, Boskin told an Associated Press reporter that the idea came from Roman jesters during the time of Constantine I in the third and fourth centuries A.D.   As the story goes, jesters successfully petitioned the ruler to allow one … Continued




Claim Your Local Literary Heroes

As you probably have read or heard, Asheville is home to many authors and literary wonders. I do not know if it’s the beautiful Western North Carolina mountains or the creative atmosphere that fosters the arts; but there are several writers who can call Asheville their home. Probably the author that is most closely associated with Asheville is Thomas Wolfe who lived just blocks away from Biblio’s office steps, from 1900-38. He was born and buried in Asheville and probably … Continued



And the winner is…

The 2010 Nobel Prize for Literature has been awarded to Peruvian writer, Mario Vargas Llosa. He is celebrated as a Latin American Renaissance Man with a career that has had more “second acts than Norman Mailer”, according to John Freeman of NPR.  He ran for Peru’s presidency in 1990, orchestrated free market principles in Peru’s banking system, initially supported Fidel Castro only to challenge his impact upon Cuba later, and served as the director of International PEN.  Today however, he will be remembered for his work as a novelist.

The Swedish Academy cited Vargas Llosa’s long history of works for “his cartography of structures of power and his trenchant images of the individual’s resistance, revolt and defeat.”   To describe Mario Vargas Llosa’s win as a long-shot is an understatement.  Ladbrokes did not list him within the top 15 and gave him 25-1 odds.   He elaborated to Spanish National Radio, as reported by Richard Lea  in guardian.co.uk , “It had been years since my name was even mentioned.  It has certainly been a total surprise, a very pleasant surprise.”   As soon as Vargas Llosa hung up the phone, his phone bagan to ring non-stop.

Biblio.com can jumpstart reading of Vargas Llosa’s work, with five selections chosen by Benedicte Page:


Book Collecting: Beer and Career

Book collecting isn’t just for the bookish, it’s a rewarding pastime for anyone who is passionate about life. Nigel Beale talks about collecting books on beer and work-related subjects, and shows us that it is indeed possible to mix work and pleasure on the bookshelf.