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Village and Castle of Bumpta

By FRASER, James Baillie (1783-1856)

London: Rodwell & Martin, 1820. Colour-printed aquatint with hand finishing by Robert Havell & Son, after Fraser. Skilful marginal repairs. A fine example of a view taken during the first recorded journey by Europeans through the Himalayas. The village and fort of Bumpta were situated on a steep hillside. The fort now lay in ruins, having been damaged by an accidental fire. The Rana of Jubbal was building a residence on its foundations. On the way to Bumpta the terrain became very rugged, and Fraser commented in his journal: "I have travelled in the Highlands of Scotland, and have made long marches there without more fatigue than is usually felt, but I must aver that a twelve or thirteen miles stage, such as of this day, has fatigued me more than upwards of three times its distance at home." In 1815, following the end of the war with Nepal, Fraser and his brother William, a political agent, spent two months on a tour of the Himalayas. Their journey took the brothers along the river valleys of the Himalayas, with occasional sorties to higher latitudes and as far as the sources of both the Jumna and Ganges rivers. This view is from the spectacular Views in the Himala Mountains which contains twenty of Havell's masterly plates worked up from sketches made on the spot by Fraser. In style the plates are similar to, and very much a match for Henry Salt's and the Daniell brothers' large scale views published 10 and 20 years earlier. This was a deliberate strategy by the publishers who drew attention to the similarities in their advertisements which describe the work as being `In Elephant Folio, uniform with Daniell's Oriental Scenery, and Salt's Views in Abyssinia..' Cf. Abbey Travel II, 498.

$3500.00

Gungotree The Holy Shrine of Mahadeo
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Gungotree The Holy Shrine of Mahadeo

By FRASER, James Baillie (1783-1856)

London: Rodwell & Martin, 1820. Hand-coloured aquatint by Robert Havell & Son, after Fraser. Several skillful marginal repairs, not affecting the image. A fine example of a view taken during the first recorded journey by Europeans through the Himalayas. Fraser wrote of this place, said to the source of the Ganges, "We were now in the centre of the stupendous Himalas, the loftiest and perhaps the most rugged range of mountains in the world. We were at the source of that noble river, equally an object of veneration and a source of fertility, plenty and opulence to Hindustan; and we had now reached the holiest shrine of Hindoo worship which these holy hills contain." In 1815, following the end of the war with Nepal, Fraser and his brother William, a political agent, spent two months on a tour of the Himalayas. Their journey took the brothers along the river valleys of the Himalayas, with occasional sorties to higher latitudes and as far as the sources of both the Jumna and Ganges rivers. This view is from the spectacular Views in the Himala Mountains which contains twenty of Havell's masterly plates worked up from sketches made on the spot by Fraser. In style the plates are similar to, and very much a match for Henry Salt's and the Daniell brothers' large scale views published 10 and 20 years earlier. This was a deliberate strategy by the publishers who drew attention to the similarities in their advertisements which describe the work as being `In Elephant Folio, uniform with Daniell's Oriental Scenery, and Salt's Views in Abyssinia..' Cf. Abbey Travel II, 498.

$3500.00

View of the Port and Town of Newcastle Upon Tyne, from the Rope Walk, Gateshead
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View of the Port and Town of Newcastle Upon Tyne, from the Rope Walk, Gateshead

By RICHARDSON, Thomas Miles, Sr. (1784-1848) engraved by Robert HAVELL (1769-1832)

1819. Aquatint printed in colors, with additional hand-coloring. Originally published by the artist, Newcastle: 1819. A modern impression, printed on hand-made wove paper, with wide margins and in excellent condition. Thomas M. Richardson was a Newcastle-based artist who began his career as an engraver of local views. From 1818 he exhibited paintings in several places in London including the Royal Academy. Views of his native city and its environs were a staple of his output. In this view, we can identify several buildings which still stand: the neoclassical Moot Hall with its porticoed entrance, and the Castle Keep behind it. Toward the center of the composition, the neo-Gothic spire of St. Nicholas' church (now cathedral) rises above a terrace of houses.

$1500.00

View of Grand Cairo
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View of Grand Cairo

By SALT, Henry (1780-1827)

London: William Miller, 1809. Hand-colored aquatint by D. Havell. Sheet size: 21 1/2 x 29 3/4 inches. In this large panoramic view, Salt demonstrates the appropriateness of the sobriquet, "City of a Thousand Minarets". In the foreground is the great Sultan Hussan Mosque, one of the largest mosques in Cairo. As we look through the streets towards the distant Nile, we see many neighborhood mosques and holy places. Henry Salt, artist, traveller, diplomat and collector of antiquities, was born at Lichfield, Staffordshire, England 14 June 1780. He was destined to be a portrait-painter, and on leaving school was taught drawing by Glover, the watercolour-painter of Lichfield. In 1797 he went to London and became a pupil of Joseph Farington, R.A., and (in 1800) of John Hoppner, R.A. The turning point in his career was 3 June 1802, when Salt left London for an eastern tour with George, viscount Valentia (afterwards Lord Mountnorris), whom he accompanied as secretary and draughtsman. He visited the Cape, India, Sri Lanka, and (in 1805) Abyssinia, returning to England on 26 Oct. 1806. He made many drawings, some of which served to illustrate Lord Valentia's Voyages and Travels to India, published in 1809. The present image is from a work titled Twenty-four Views in St. Helena, the Cape, India, Ceylon, the Red Sea, Abyssinia and Egypt , published by William Miller, with hand-coloured aquatints by D. Havell and J. Bluck from Salt's own drawings. The originals of all these drawings were retained by Lord Valentia, who also retained the ownership of the copper plates after Salt's death. The format and style of presentation of the plates is similar to Thomas and William Daniell's great work, Oriental Scenery (1795-1808), and displays great artistry by both Salt and his engravers.

$3750.00

Mosque at Lucknow
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Mosque at Lucknow

By SALT, Henry (1780-1827)

London: William Miller, 1809. Hand-colored aquatint by John Hill. Sheet size: 21 1/8 x 29 5/8 inches. The Grand Mosque of the Bada Imambara, one of the architectural wonders of India This great Mughal shrine was completed in 1784 by the Nawab of Awadh, Asaf-ud-Daula. Henry Salt, artist, traveller, diplomat and collector of antiquities, was born at Lichfield, Staffordshire, England 14 June 1780. He was destined to be a portrait-painter, and on leaving school was taught drawing by Glover, the watercolour-painter of Lichfield. In 1797 he went to London and became a pupil of Joseph Farington, R.A., and (in 1800) of John Hoppner, R.A. The turning point in his career was 3 June 1802, when Salt left London for an eastern tour with George, viscount Valentia (afterwards Lord Mountnorris), whom he accompanied as secretary and draughtsman. He visited the Cape, India, Sri Lanka, and (in 1805) Abyssinia, returning to England on 26 Oct. 1806. He made many drawings, some of which served to illustrate Lord Valentia's Voyages and Travels to India , published in 1809. The present image is from a work titled Twenty-four Views in St. Helena, the Cape, India, Ceylon, the Red Sea, Abyssinia and Egyp t, published by William Miller, with hand-coloured aquatints by D. Havell and J. Bluck from Salt's own drawings. The originals of all these drawings were retained by Lord Valentia, who also retained the ownership of the copper plates after Salt's death. The format and style of presentation of the plates is similar to Thomas and William Daniell's great work, Oriental Scenery (1795-1808), and displays great artistry by both Salt and his engravers. Abbey Travel II 515 no.3.

$3750.00

Cannoge, on the River Ganges
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Cannoge, on the River Ganges

By DANIELL, Thomas (1749-1840) and William DANIELL (1769-1837)

London: published by Thomas Daniell. Aquatint by and after Thomas & William Daniell, coloured by hand. Image size: 17 3/4 x 23 3/8 inches; sheet size: 21 1/8 x 29 1/8 inches. A beautiful, atmospheric landscape of an ancient northern Indian capital Kannauj was an important centre under Harsha, the most powerful ruler of Northern India in the early 7th century, and it later became the capital of the Pratihara dynasty. Looking at the ruined tombs in the distance the artists lamented that '...It is impossible to look at these miserable remnants of the great city of Cannoge without the most melancholy sensations, and the strongest conviction of the instability of man's proudest works.' The Daniells' Oriental Scenery is considered to be the finest illustrated work on India. Thomas Daniell and his nephew William spent nine years in India making studies, sketches and drawings of the scenery, architecture, and antiquities that graced the countryside. They then devoted a further thirteen years to publishing their remarkably accurate aquatints. In Britain, the impact was explosive. A cult of Indian architecture, landscaping and interior decoration arose, with the Royal Pavilion at Brighton as its centerpiece. The Daniells gave the English public their first accurate look at the exotic sub-continent. Their great achievement still lies in their ability to blend the picturesque with the real, resulting in images that capture the European taste for the sublime landscape, while still remaining faithful to their subjects. The Daniells brought the romance of the English landscape to the antiquities of India and provided England with an accurate vision of this wondrous country. Consisting of one hundred and forty-four views, published in six parts, the work was issued in seven stages: three sets of twenty-four plates titled Oriental Scenery with title dates of 1795, 1797, and 1801; twelve plates titled Antiquities of India dated 1799; twenty-four plates titled Hindoo Excavations dated 1803; twenty-four plates titled Views in Hindoostan dated 1807; and twelve further plates of Antiquities of India published without a title page in 1808. All plates were engraved by the Daniells and all are taken from their drawings save the twenty-four plates of Hindoo Excavations , which are after drawings by James Wales. Abbey Travel II.420 no.88; cf. Lowndes I, p.588; Martinelli/Michell India Yesterday and today ''92 Rayakottai, fort'; cf. RIBA 799-804; cf. Sutton The Daniells (1954) p.156; cf. Tooley 172.

$4000.00

The Ashes of Ravana
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The Ashes of Ravana

By DANIELL, Thomas (1749-1840) after James WALES

London: Thos. Daniell R.A. Howland Street Fitzroy Square, 1803. Engraved by and under the direction of Thos. Daniell. Hand-coloured aquatint. Image size: 17 3/4 x 23 1/2 inches. Sheet size: 21 x 29 1/8 inches. A Hindu sanctuary at Ellora in western India The cave known as Ravana-ki Khai is single-storeyed excavation dating from the 7th Century and consists of a square columned mandapa and a verandah. The facade has lost several of its piers revealing the large pillared hall behind. The columns of the hall have pot and foliage capitals and rectangular brackets. Figural panels include Shaivite sculptures on the south wall and Vaishnava images on the north wall. The Daniells' Oriental Scenery is considered to be the finest illustrated works on India. Thomas Daniell and his nephew William spent nine years in India making studies, sketches and drawings of the scenery, architecture, and antiquities that graced the countryside. They then devoted a further thirteen years to publishing their remarkably accurate aquatints. In Britain, the impact was explosive. A cult of Indian architecture, landscaping and interior decoration arose, with the Royal Pavilion at Brighton as its centerpiece. The Daniells gave the English public their first accurate look at the exotic sub-continent. Their great achievement still lies in their ability to blend the picturesque with the real, resulting in images that capture the European taste for the sublime landscape, while still remaining faithful to their subjects. The Daniells brought the romance of the English landscape to the antiquities of India and provided England with an accurate vision of this wondrous country. Consisting of one hundred and forty-four views, published in six parts, the work was issued in seven stages: three sets of twenty-four plates titled Oriental Scenery with title dates of 1795, 1797, and 1801; twelve plates titled Antiquities of India dated 1799; twenty-four plates titled Hindoo Excavations dated 1803; twenty-four plates titled Views in Hindoostan dated 1807; and twelve further plates of Antiquities of India published without a title page in 1808. All plates were engraved by the Daniells and all are taken from their drawings save the twenty-four plates of Hindoo Excavations , which are after drawings by James Wales. Abbey Travel II.420 no.88; cf. Lowndes I, p.588; Martinelli/Michell India Yesterday and today ''140 - Ellora, Ravana-ki Khai'; cf. RIBA 799-804; cf. Sutton The Daniells (1954) p.156; cf. Tooley 172.

$2500.00

Waterfall at Puppanassum, in the Tinnevelly District
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Waterfall at Puppanassum, in the Tinnevelly District

By DANIELL, Thomas (1749-1840) and William DANIELL (1769-1837)

London: published by Thomas Daniell. Aquatint by and after Thomas & William Daniell, coloured by hand. Image size: 17 3/4 x 23 1/4; sheet size: 21 1/8 x 29 1/8 inches. The Daniells were fascinated by the waterfall of Papanasam in the southern Tamil country and, approaching the pilgrims who were paying homage to the relief carvings on the rock, remarked, 'Nothing can be more grand and impressive than when...this extraordinary scene bursts upon the sight. It would be difficult for those who have never seen a vast river precipitated down a rocky steep of considerable elevation, to form an adequate idea of such a spectacle, accompanied by a noise so tremendous, that, comparatively, all other sounds are but whispers'. Papanasam is in the Tamil region of southern India. The Daniells' Oriental Scenery is considered to be the finest illustrated works on India. Thomas Daniell and his nephew William spent nine years in India making studies, sketches and drawings of the scenery, architecture, and antiquities that graced the countryside. They then devoted a further thirteen years to publishing their remarkably accurate aquatints. In Britain, the impact was explosive. A cult of Indian architecture, landscaping and interior decoration arose, with the Royal Pavilion at Brighton as its centerpiece. The Daniells gave the English public their first accurate look at the exotic sub-continent. Their great achievement still lies in their ability to blend the picturesque with the real, resulting in images that capture the European taste for the sublime landscape, while still remaining faithful to their subjects. The Daniells brought the romance of the English landscape to the antiquities of India and provided England with an accurate vision of this wondrous country. Consisting of one hundred and forty-four views, published in six parts, the work was issued in seven stages: three sets of twenty-four plates titled Oriental Scenery with title dates of 1795, 1797, and 1801; twelve plates titled Antiquities of India dated 1799; twenty-four plates titled Hindoo Excavations dated 1803; twenty-four plates titled Views in Hindoostan dated 1807; and twelve further plates of Antiquities of India published without a title page in 1808. All plates were engraved by the Daniells and all are taken from their drawings save the twenty-four plates of Hindoo Excavations , which are after drawings by James Wales. Abbey Travel II.420 no.88; cf. Lowndes I, p.588; Martinelli/Michell India Yesterday and today ''92 Rayakottai, fort'; cf. RIBA 799-804; cf. Sutton The Daniells (1954) p.156; cf. Tooley 172.

$4000.00

Cheval-Pettore in the Tinnevelly District
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Cheval-Pettore in the Tinnevelly District

By DANIELL, Thomas (1749-1840) and William DANIELL (1769-1837)

London: published by Thomas Daniell. Aquatint by and after Thomas & William Daniell, coloured by hand. Image size: 17 5/8 x 23 1/2 inches; sheet size: 21 1/8 x 29 1/8 inches. An impressive 18th century fortification in Souther India This fort, with its circular bastions made of sun-dried mud, was built by the Madurai Nayakas to withstand the incursions of the Nawabs of Arcot in the early 18th Century. It was set in a majestic landscape on the outskirts of the town of Srivilliputtur, dominated by the steep slopes of the Varushanad hills, but it has long ago disappeared. Srivilliputhur is in the Tamil Nadu district of southern India. The Daniells' Oriental Scenery is considered to be the finest illustrated work on India. Thomas Daniell and his nephew William spent nine years in India making studies, sketches and drawings of the scenery, architecture, and antiquities that graced the countryside. They then devoted a further thirteen years to publishing their remarkably accurate aquatints. In Britain, the impact was explosive. A cult of Indian architecture, landscaping and interior decoration arose, with the Royal Pavilion at Brighton as its centerpiece. The Daniells gave the English public their first accurate look at the exotic sub-continent. Their great achievement still lies in their ability to blend the picturesque with the real, resulting in images that capture the European taste for the sublime landscape, while still remaining faithful to their subjects. The Daniells brought the romance of the English landscape to the antiquities of India and provided England with an accurate vision of this wondrous country. Consisting of one hundred and forty-four views, published in six parts, the work was issued in seven stages: three sets of twenty-four plates titled Oriental Scenery with title dates of 1795, 1797, and 1801; twelve plates titled Antiquities of India dated 1799; twenty-four plates titled Hindoo Excavations dated 1803; twenty-four plates titled Views in Hindoostan dated 1807; and twelve further plates of Antiquities of India published without a title page in 1808. All plates were engraved by the Daniells and all are taken from their drawings save the twenty-four plates of Hindoo Excavations , which are after drawings by James Wales. Abbey Travel II.420 no.88; cf. Lowndes I, p.588; Martinelli/Michell India Yesterday and today ''92 Rayakottai, fort'; cf. RIBA 799-804; cf. Sutton The Daniells (1954) p.156; cf. Tooley 172.

$4500.00

The Rope Bridge at Serinagur [Srinagar]
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The Rope Bridge at Serinagur [Srinagar]

By DANIELL, Thomas (1749-1840) and William DANIELL (1769-1837)

London: published by Thomas Daniell. Aquatint by and after Thomas & William Daniell, coloured by hand. Image size: 17 3/4 x 23 1/2; sheet size: 21 1/8 x 29 1/8 inches. A stunning view of the rope bridge across the Alaknanda valley in Srinagar, from Thomas and William Daniell's celebrated book "Oriental Scenery". The Alaknanda River joins the Bhagirathi to form the Ganges. The Daniells' Oriental Scenery is considered to be the finest illustrated work on India. Thomas Daniell and his nephew William spent nine years in India making studies, sketches and drawings of the scenery, architecture, and antiquities that graced the countryside. They then devoted a further thirteen years to publishing their remarkably accurate aquatints. In Britain, the impact was explosive. A cult of Indian architecture, landscaping and interior decoration arose, with the Royal Pavilion at Brighton as its centerpiece. The Daniells gave the English public their first accurate look at the exotic sub-continent. Their great achievement still lies in their ability to blend the picturesque with the real, resulting in images that capture the European taste for the sublime landscape, while still remaining faithful to their subjects. The Daniells brought the romance of the English landscape to the antiquities of India and provided England with an accurate vision of this wondrous country. Consisting of one hundred and forty-four views, published in six parts, the work was issued in seven stages: three sets of twenty-four plates titled Oriental Scenery with title dates of 1795, 1797, and 1801; twelve plates titled Antiquities of India dated 1799; twenty-four plates titled Hindoo Excavations dated 1803; twenty-four plates titled Views in Hindoostan dated 1807; and twelve further plates of Antiquities of India published without a title page in 1808. All plates were engraved by the Daniells and all are taken from their drawings save the twenty-four plates of Hindoo Excavations , which are after drawings by James Wales. In their travels through the Himalayas the Daniells descended to the Alaknanda valley, entering Sringagar on the 27 of April, 1789. They were the first Europeans to visit this remote region and were immediately approached by the local raja, who entreated them to help in resolving a bitter feud with the neighboring ruler of Kumaon. They stayed only three days and left hurriedly in hope of avoiding offending the raja. While there, they sketched this lovely view of the rope bridge across the Alaknanda valley. While in the region William made the following observations regarding their sojourn, "The Rajah was in the middle of one of his recurring feuds with his brother, and "the inhabitants of Sirinagur were crossing the River as Quick as possible - they crowded on the Bridge so fast that we thought at times it would have broke, taking their Chesebust, Cots &c with them" (Journal of William Daniell). Abbey Travel II.420 no.88; cf. Lowndes I, p.588; Martinelli/Michell India Yesterday and today ''92 Rayakottai, fort'; cf. RIBA 799-804; cf. Sutton The Daniells (1954) p.156; cf. Tooley 172.

$4000.00

Gate of the Loll-Baug, at Fyzabad
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Gate of the Loll-Baug, at Fyzabad

By DANIELL, Thomas (1749-1840) and William DANIELL (1769-1837)

London: Thos. Daniell R. A. Howland Street Fitzroy Square, 1801. Hand-coloured aquatint on heavy wove paper. Image: 17 3/4 x 23 5/8 inches; sheet size: 21 x 29 1/8 inches. A fine example of 18th century Mughal architecture in Uttar Pradesh, near Nepal The print shows the entrance gateway to the Lal Bagh at Faizabad, a pleasure garden established by Shuja' al-Daula (1732-1775). Shuja' al-Daula was ruler (Nawab) of the state of Avadh whose capital was Faizabad. It is built in typical late Mughal style with a plethora of small arches and overhanging balconies with curvilinear roofs. Faizabad was the first capital of the Nawabs of Avadh under Nawabs Burhan al-Mulk and Safdar Jang, before the latter moved it to Lucknow. Shuja' al-Daula moved the capital back to Faizabad from 1765-75 as it was more strategically placed at a time of tension with the East India Company based in Calcutta. The Daniells' Oriental Scenery is considered to be the finest illustrated works on India. Thomas Daniell and his nephew William spent nine years in India making studies, sketches and drawings of the scenery, architecture, and antiquities that graced the countryside. They then devoted a further thirteen years to publishing their remarkably accurate aquatints. In Britain, the impact was explosive. A cult of Indian architecture, landscaping and interior decoration arose, with the Royal Pavilion at Brighton as its centerpiece. The Daniells gave the English public their first accurate look at the exotic sub-continent. Their great achievement still lies in their ability to blend the picturesque with the real, resulting in images that capture the European taste for the sublime landscape, while still remaining faithful to their subjects. The Daniells brought the romance of the English landscape to the antiquities of India and provided England with an accurate vision of this wondrous country. Consisting of one hundred and forty-four views, published in six parts, the work was issued in seven stages: three sets of twenty-four plates titled Oriental Scenery with title dates of 1795, 1797, and 1801; twelve plates titled Antiquities of India dated 1799; twenty-four plates titled Hindoo Excavations dated 1803; twenty-four plates titled Views in Hindoostan dated 1807; and twelve further plates of Antiquities of India published without a title page in 1808. All plates were engraved by the Daniells and all are taken from their drawings save the twenty-four plates of Hindoo Excavations , which are after drawings by James Wales.

$4500.00

The Punj Mahalla Gate, Lucknow
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The Punj Mahalla Gate, Lucknow

By DANIELL, Thomas (1749-1840) and William DANIELL (1769-1837)

London: Thos. Daniell R. A. Howland Street Fitzroy Square, 1801. Hand-coloured aquatint on heavy wove paper, image size: 18 1/8 x 23 3/4 inches, sheet size: 21 x 29 1/9 inches. A distinguished and unusual example of Mughal architecture This monumental gateway, which shows the fish emblem of the Nawabs of Avadh on the spandrels, used to lead to the palace of Nawab Shuja' al-Daula in Lucknow. It was mostly built by him and his father Safdar Jang round an earlier fortification in the period 1752-65 . The ramp within the gateway was for allowing elephants' easy access to the inner courtyard. The gateway is built in a simple and solid architectural style, typical of the Late Mughal style of Lucknow of this period. The Daniells' Oriental Scenery is considered to be the finest illustrated works on India. Thomas Daniell and his nephew William spent nine years in India making studies, sketches and drawings of the scenery, architecture, and antiquities that graced the countryside. They then devoted a further thirteen years to publishing their remarkably accurate aquatints. In Britain, the impact was explosive. A cult of Indian architecture, landscaping and interior decoration arose, with the Royal Pavilion at Brighton as its centerpiece. The Daniells gave the English public their first accurate look at the exotic sub-continent. Their great achievement still lies in their ability to blend the picturesque with the real, resulting in images that capture the European taste for the sublime landscape, while still remaining faithful to their subjects. The Daniells brought the romance of the English landscape to the antiquities of India and provided England with an accurate vision of this wondrous country. Consisting of one hundred and forty-four views, published in six parts, the work was issued in seven stages: three sets of twenty-four plates titled Oriental Scenery with title dates of 1795, 1797, and 1801; twelve plates titled Antiquities of India dated 1799; twenty-four plates titled Hindoo Excavations dated 1803; twenty-four plates titled Views in Hindoostan dated 1807; and twelve further plates of Antiquities of India published without a title page in 1808. All plates were engraved by the Daniells and all are taken from their drawings save the twenty-four plates of Hindoo Excavations , which are after drawings by James Wales. jpg.

$4000.00

Lucnow Taken from the Opposite Bank of the River Goomty
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Lucnow Taken from the Opposite Bank of the River Goomty

By DANIELL, Thomas (1749-1840) and William DANIELL (1769-1837)

London: published by Thomas Daniell. Aquatint by and after Thomas & William Daniell, coloured by hand. Image size: 17 3/4 x 23 3/4; Sheet size: 21 1/8 x 29 1/8 inches. A vast panorama of the region around Lucknow in Uttar Pradesh, near Nepal In 1775 Nawab Asaf al-Daula moved the capital of Avadh from Faizabad back to Lucknow and during his reign until 1797 transformed the city with many new splendid buildings. His new palace can be seen in the distance in this aquatint, with the old palace of his predecessors on the left. The Mosque with its tall minarets had been built in the late 17th century by the emperor Aurangzeb (1618-1707) the long lived Mughal emperor. The Daniells' Oriental Scenery is considered to be the finest illustrated works on India. Thomas Daniell and his nephew William spent nine years in India making studies, sketches and drawings of the scenery, architecture, and antiquities that graced the countryside. They then devoted a further thirteen years to publishing their remarkably accurate aquatints. In Britain, the impact was explosive. A cult of Indian architecture, landscaping and interior decoration arose, with the Royal Pavilion at Brighton as its centerpiece. The Daniells gave the English public their first accurate look at the exotic sub-continent. Their great achievement still lies in their ability to blend the picturesque with the real, resulting in images that capture the European taste for the sublime landscape, while still remaining faithful to their subjects. The Daniells brought the romance of the English landscape to the antiquities of India and provided England with an accurate vision of this wondrous country. Consisting of one hundred and forty-four views, published in six parts, the work was issued in seven stages: three sets of twenty-four plates titled Oriental Scenery with title dates of 1795, 1797, and 1801; twelve plates titled Antiquities of India dated 1799; twenty-four plates titled Hindoo Excavations dated 1803; twenty-four plates titled Views in Hindoostan dated 1807; and twelve further plates of Antiquities of India published without a title page in 1808. All plates were engraved by the Daniells and all are taken from their drawings save the twenty-four plates of Hindoo Excavations , which are after drawings by James Wales. Abbey Travel II.420 no.88; cf. Lowndes I, p.588; Martinelli/Michell India Yesterday and today ''92 Rayakottai, fort'; cf. RIBA 799-804; cf. Sutton The Daniells (1954) p.156; cf. Tooley 172.

$4500.00

Mausoleum of Amir Khusero at the ancient City of Delhi
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Mausoleum of Amir Khusero at the ancient City of Delhi

By DANIELL, Thomas (1749-1840) and William DANIELL (1769-1837)

London: published byThomas Daniell. Hand-coloured aquatint on heavy wove paper. Image size: 17 5/8 x 23 1/2 inches; Sheet size: 21 29 1/8 inches. Mis-identified by the Daniell's, this fine Mughal monument was the Chausath Khamba built by Mirza Aziz Koka (c. 1542-1624) for himself in 1623-24. This mausoleum was misidentified by the Daniells as the tomb of the celebrated Delhi poet Amir Khusrau, which lies nearby in the shrine complex of Nizamuddin. It is in fact the tomb of Mirza 'Aziz Koka, foster brother of the Emperor Akbar, (Koka means foster brother), who died in 1624. It is one of the earliest of a new type of Mughal tomb, the flat-roofed hypostyle hall, here encased in white marble, with white marble jalis or pierced screens around the sides. It is known as the Chaunsath Kambha or '64 pillars': it consists of 6 by 6 bays, with pillars doubled round the periphery, and quadrupled at the corners. The Daniells' Oriental Scenery is considered to be the finest illustrated works on India. Thomas Daniell and his nephew William spent nine years in India making studies, sketches and drawings of the scenery, architecture, and antiquities that graced the countryside. They then devoted a further thirteen years to publishing their remarkably accurate aquatints. In Britain, the impact was explosive. A cult of Indian architecture, landscaping and interior decoration arose, with the Royal Pavilion at Brighton as its centerpiece. The Daniells gave the English public their first accurate look at the exotic sub-continent. Their great achievement still lies in their ability to blend the picturesque with the real, resulting in images that capture the European taste for the sublime landscape, while still remaining faithful to their subjects. The Daniells brought the romance of the English landscape to the antiquities of India and provided England with an accurate vision of this wondrous country. Consisting of one hundred and forty-four views, published in six parts, the work was issued in seven stages: three sets of twenty-four plates titled Oriental Scenery with title dates of 1795, 1797, and 1801; twelve plates titled Antiquities of India dated 1799; twenty-four plates titled Hindoo Excavations dated 1803; twenty-four plates titled Views in Hindoostan dated 1807; and twelve further plates of Antiquities of India published without a title page in 1808. All plates were engraved by the Daniells and all are taken from their drawings save the twenty-four plates of Hindoo Excavations, which are after drawings by James Wales.

$4000.00

A View at Delhi, near the Mausoleum of Humaioon
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A View at Delhi, near the Mausoleum of Humaioon

By DANIELL, Thomas (1749-1840) and William DANIELL (1769-1837)

London: published by Thomas Daniell. Aquatint by and after Thomas & William Daniell, coloured by hand. Image size: 17 7/8 x 23 3/4; 21 1/8 x 29 1/8 inches. The mausoleum of Humayun is one of the great Mughal monuments The plain around the Mausoleum of Humayun, now within the modern city of New Delhi, was covered when this building was erected with the remains of tombs, forts, mosques and palaces from the earlier dynasties of the Delhi Sultanate (1193-1527). The tomb of Humayun (reg. 1530-40, 1555-56), the second Mughal emperor, and father of Akbar, was built by his wife after his death from 1565 - 1572. It represents the first example of the Mughal garden-tomb complex, a monumental symmetrical composition set in a walled garden enclosure, meant to adumbrate Paradise as described in the Koran. The gate on the extreme left in this aquatint is the principal entrance to the mausoleum. The Daniells' Oriental Scenery is considered to be the finest illustrated works on India. Thomas Daniell and his nephew William spent nine years in India making studies, sketches and drawings of the scenery, architecture, and antiquities that graced the countryside. They then devoted a further thirteen years to publishing their remarkably accurate aquatints. In Britain, the impact was explosive. A cult of Indian architecture, landscaping and interior decoration arose, with the Royal Pavilion at Brighton as its centerpiece. The Daniells gave the English public their first accurate look at the exotic sub-continent. Their great achievement still lies in their ability to blend the picturesque with the real, resulting in images that capture the European taste for the sublime landscape, while still remaining faithful to their subjects. The Daniells brought the romance of the English landscape to the antiquities of India and provided England with an accurate vision of this wondrous country. Consisting of one hundred and forty-four views, published in six parts, the work was issued in seven stages: three sets of twenty-four plates titled Oriental Scenery with title dates of 1795, 1797, and 1801; twelve plates titled Antiquities of India dated 1799; twenty-four plates titled Hindoo Excavations dated 1803; twenty-four plates titled Views in Hindoostan dated 1807; and twelve further plates of Antiquities of India published without a title page in 1808. All plates were engraved by the Daniells and all are taken from their drawings save the twenty-four plates of Hindoo Excavations , which are after drawings by James Wales. Abbey Travel II.420 no.88; cf. Lowndes I, p.588; Martinelli/Michell India Yesterday and today ''92 Rayakottai, fort'; cf. RIBA 799-804; cf. Sutton The Daniells (1954) p.156; cf. Tooley 172.

$5000.00

Ruins at Cannouge [Kannauj]
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Ruins at Cannouge [Kannauj]

By DANIELL, Thomas (1749-1840) and William DANIELL (1769-1837)

London: published byThomas Daniell, 1802. Hand-colored aquatint on heavy wove paper. Image size: 17 5/8 x 23 5/8 inches; Sheet size: 21 x 29 1/8 inches. A highly atmospheric depiction of a once splendid capital Kannauj, the ancient city of Kanyakubja, the capital of the Emperor Harshavardhana (early 7th century) and later of the Pratihara dynasty (mid-7th to the 11th centuries), had by the early 15th century become an important Muslim city, part of the Sultanate of Jaunpur. The Jami' Masjid or Congregational Mosque in Kannauj was converted from former Hindu buildings in the period 1400-06 by Sultan Ibraham Shah of Jaunpur. The Daniell print shows the relatively unadorned front of the half ruined prayer hall with its pointed arches and polygonal columns typical of Muslim architecture in India before the arrival of the Mughals, although the richly carved corbels supporting the mostly vanished chajja or heavy eave are typically Hindu. Facing the mosque is an ancient tomb. The Daniells' Oriental Scenery is considered to be the finest illustrated works on India. Thomas Daniell and his nephew William spent nine years in India making studies, sketches and drawings of the scenery, architecture, and antiquities that graced the countryside. They then devoted a further thirteen years to publishing their remarkably accurate aquatints. In Britain, the impact was explosive. A cult of Indian architecture, landscaping and interior decoration arose, with the Royal Pavilion at Brighton as its centerpiece. The Daniells gave the English public their first accurate look at the exotic sub-continent. Their great achievement still lies in their ability to blend the picturesque with the real, resulting in images that capture the European taste for the sublime landscape, while still remaining faithful to their subjects. The Daniells brought the romance of the English landscape to the antiquities of India and provided England with an accurate vision of this wondrous country. Consisting of one hundred and forty-four views, published in six parts, the work was issued in seven stages: three sets of twenty-four plates titled Oriental Scenery with title dates of 1795, 1797, and 1801; twelve plates titled Antiquities of India dated 1799; twenty-four plates titled Hindoo Excavations dated 1803; twenty-four plates titled Views in Hindoostan dated 1807; and twelve further plates of Antiquities of India published without a title page in 1808. All plates were engraved by the Daniells and all are taken from their drawings save the twenty-four plates of Hindoo Excavations , which are after drawings by James Wales.

$3500.00

View of Mutura, on the River Jumna
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View of Mutura, on the River Jumna

By DANIELL, Thomas (1749-1840) and William DANIELL (1769-1837)

London: published by Thomas Daniell. Aquatint by and after Thomas & William Daniell, coloured by hand. Image size: 17 7/8 x 23 1/2; Sheet size: 21 1/8 x 29 1/8 inches. This view of the ancient city of Mathura, one of the seven holy cities of Hinduism, is taken from a garden pavilion on the opposite bank of the river Jumna [Yamuna River]. Mathura is particularly associated wtih the exploits of the Hindu god Krishna. The principal buildings visible are the fort built by Raja Man Singh of Amber at the beginning of the 17th century, and the Jami Masjid with its four minarets, which was erected 1660-1668 by Aurangzeb's governor 'Abd al-Nabi Khan. Mathura is in the Uttar Pradesh state, northwest of Agra, in northeastern India. The Daniells' Oriental Scenery is considered to be the finest illustrated works on India. Thomas Daniell and his nephew William spent nine years in India making studies, sketches and drawings of the scenery, architecture, and antiquities that graced the countryside. They then devoted a further thirteen years to publishing their remarkably accurate aquatints. In Britain, the impact was explosive. A cult of Indian architecture, landscaping and interior decoration arose, with the Royal Pavilion at Brighton as its centerpiece. The Daniells gave the English public their first accurate look at the exotic sub-continent. Their great achievement still lies in their ability to blend the picturesque with the real, resulting in images that capture the European taste for the sublime landscape, while still remaining faithful to their subjects. The Daniells brought the romance of the English landscape to the antiquities of India and provided England with an accurate vision of this wondrous country. Consisting of one hundred and forty-four views, published in six parts, the work was issued in seven stages: three sets of twenty-four plates titled Oriental Scenery with title dates of 1795, 1797, and 1801; twelve plates titled Antiquities of India dated 1799; twenty-four plates titled Hindoo Excavations dated 1803; twenty-four plates titled Views in Hindoostan dated 1807; and twelve further plates of Antiquities of India published without a title page in 1808. All plates were engraved by the Daniells and all are taken from their drawings save the twenty-four plates of Hindoo Excavations , which are after drawings by James Wales. Abbey Travel II.420 no.88; cf. Lowndes I, p.588; Martinelli/Michell India Yesterday and today ''92 Rayakottai, fort'; cf. RIBA 799-804; cf. Sutton The Daniells (1954) p.156; cf. Tooley 172.

$4500.00

Tereoboo, King of Owyhee, Bringing Presents to Capt. Cook
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Tereoboo, King of Owyhee, Bringing Presents to Capt. Cook

By WEBBER, John (1752-1793)

[London: G. Nicol & T. Cadell, 1784. Etched and engraved by B. T. Pouncy after a drawing by Webber. Image size: 9 1/8 x 14 3/4 inches. John Webber, R.A. was born in London of Swiss parents. He was the draughtsman on Captain Cook's third and final voyage to the South Seas. In this scene, the King of Hawaii is shown with his entourage on his way to greet Captain Cook. On one of the three large catamaran-style canoes are three large carved idols with frightening faces. Webber was the official artist on Cook's historic and final Pacific voyage. The drawings were the source for the engravings that illustrated Cook's "A Voyage to the Pacific", which was published in 1784.

$1200.00

A Man of the Sandwich Islands, Dancing
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A Man of the Sandwich Islands, Dancing

By WEBBER, John (1752-1793)

[London: G. Nicol & T. Cadell, 1784. Etched and engraved by C. Grignion after a drawing by Webber. Image size: 10 1/4 x 7 inches. Sheet size: 22 x 15 1/2 inches. John Webber, R.A. was born in London of Swiss parents. He was the draughtsman on Captain Cook's third and final voyage to the South Seas. In this attractive portrait, a young, muscular man dances what was then a sacred dance called Hula. In his right hand he holds a feather covered gourd. Virtually nude, he wears only a bark cloth "malo" or loin cloth, a coral necklace and dogtooth leggings. His body is tattooed in rhythmic patterns that flow down his arms and legs. Webber was the official artist on Cook's historic and final Pacific voyage. The drawings were the source for the engravings that illustrated Cook's "A Voyage to the Pacific", which was published in 1784.

$1200.00

Arrivée des Européens en Afrique
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Arrivée des Européens en Afrique

By FRERET, Louis

Paris, 1795. Stipple engraving, with etching and mezzotint, 17 x 20 inches. Minor mat stain, one diagonal crease, small tape remnants on verso. Very good. The Europeans arrive in idyllic West Africa An idealized image of life in West Africa produced as part of early anti-slavery literature in Republic-era France. An evocative engraved view of peaceful Africans poised to trade goods with Europeans landing on shore in a long-boat, with their ship behind them. Also includes depictions of wildlife, fruit, and African trade goods, such as tusks and bread. Colibert engraved the image after Freret. Rare.

$1750.00

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